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I don't know exactly how to word a search for this.. so I haven't had any luck finding anything.. :S

I need to implement a time delay in C.

for example I want to do some stuff, then wait say 1 minute, then continue on doing stuff.

Did that make sense? Can anyone help me out?

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2  
What platform and OS? –  detly Oct 14 '10 at 5:39
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11 Answers 11

up vote 9 down vote accepted

In standard C (C99), you can use time() to do this:

#include <time.h>
:
void waitFor (unsigned int secs) {
    retTime = time(0) + secs;     // Get finishing time.
    while (time(0) < retTime);    // Loop until it arrives.
}

By the way, this assumes time() returns a 1-second resolution value. I don't think that's mandated by the standard so you may have to adjust for it.


In order to clarify, this is the only way I'm aware of to do this with ISO C99 (and the question is tagged with nothing more than "C" which usually means portable solutions are desirable although, of course, vendor-specific solutions may still be given).

By all means, if you're on a platform that provides a more efficient way, use it. As several comments have indicated, there may be specific problems with a tight loop like this, with regard to CPU usage and battery life.

Any decent time-slicing OS would be able to drop the dynamic priority of a task that continuously uses its full time slice but the battery power may be more problematic.

However C specifies nothing about the OS details in a hosted environment, and this answer is for ISO C and ISO C alone (so no use of sleep, select, Win32 API calls or anything like that).

And keep in mind that POSIX sleep can be interrupted by signals. If you are going to go down that path, you need to do something like:

int finishing = 0; // set finishing in signal handler 
                   // if you want to really stop.

void sleepWrapper (unsigned int secs) {
    unsigned int left = secs;
    while ((left > 0) && (!finishing)) // Don't continue if signal has
        left = sleep (left);           //   indicated exit needed.
}
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what abt the cpu load? –  SysAdmin Oct 14 '10 at 6:00
1  
Yes, there will be a CPU load, but any decent OS (assuming pre-emptively multi-tasking) will detect that and drop the dynamic priority accordingly. And, if it's not, the CPU load doesn't matter (if it's co-operatively multitasked, you may want to look into a yield function). The reason I posted this is because there is no ISO-C portable way to do it and the question is tagged only "C" (sleep, while useful, is not standard). –  paxdiablo Oct 14 '10 at 6:04
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@paxdiablo: No, actually it wont... The clock frequency of one of the CPUs will rise to 100% percent. And the CPU load matters, especially if you're on a laptop, when the CPU is maxed up it generates heat, and heat shortens the computers lifetime. On an old stationary that does probably not matter, this is how windows handles it (en endless loop doing nothing when there is noting to do). I guess that today OSes uses advanced power saving techinques, but I know that the Linux kernel issued a hlt instruction, same did I when I was 12. –  Frank Oct 14 '10 at 6:17
2  
sleep( sec ) is apparently a ISO/IEC 9945-1:1990 (POSIX 1) standard, it is just Microsoft that does their way while the rest of the world does one way... –  Frank Oct 14 '10 at 6:23
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@Frank, I think volatile sig_atomic_t finishing is the right declaration for a variable shared between a signal handler and the main thread. I just wanted to point out that there are often outside requirements that must be respected... –  RBerteig Oct 14 '10 at 8:35
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Here is how you can do it on most desktop systems:

#ifdef _WIN32
    #include <windows.h>
#else
    #include <unistd.h>
#endif

void wait( int seconds )
{   // Pretty crossplatform, both ALL POSIX compliant systems AND Windows
    #ifdef _WIN32
        Sleep( 1000 * seconds );
    #else
        sleep( seconds );
    #endif
}

int
main( int argc, char **argv)
{
    int running = 3;
    while( running )
    {   // do something
        --running;
        wait( 3 );
    }
    return 0; // OK
}

Here is how you can do it on a microcomputer / processor w/o timer:

int wait_loop0 = 10000;
int wait_loop1 = 6000;

// for microprocessor without timer, if it has a timer refer to vendor documentation and use it instead.
void
wait( int seconds )
{   // this function needs to be finetuned for the specific microprocessor
    int i, j, k;
    for(i = 0; i < seconds; i++)
    {
        for(j = 0; j < wait_loop0; j++)
        {
            for(k = 0; k < wait_loop1; k++)
            {   // waste function, volatile makes sure it is not being optimized out by compiler
                int volatile t = 120 * j * i + k;
                t = t + 5;
            }
        }
    }
}

int
main( int argc, char **argv)
{
    int running = 3;
    while( running )
    {   // do something
        --running;
        wait( 3 );
    }
    return 0; // OK
}

The waitloop variables must be fine tuned, those did work pretty close for my computer, but the frequency scale thing makes it very imprecise for a modern desktop system; So don't use there unless you're bare to the metal and not doing such stuff.

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+1 to offset an IMHO undeserved downvote. On the other hand, you are clearly assuming an OS with useful system calls and the actual question only mentions standard C which as Pax points out lacks any kind of delay call. A very large amount of C code is running on platforms without operating systems. Although some mechanism similar to sleep() is often a good thing to create in such platforms, it isn't required by any of the C standards. –  RBerteig Oct 14 '10 at 8:04
    
I was thinking on writing of how to do it on microprocessors to without an OS, but did not quite felt to. Not really my field. –  Frank Oct 14 '10 at 8:24
1  
@Frank, Even with no OS, you often have a counter implemented in hardware that counts cycles of some clock. So one way is to read that counter, predict a future value, and spin in a loop until the counter reaches the value. That works for short enough waits that the counter isn't wrapping more than once while waiting. In small CPUs you sometimes have to resort to hand-tuned loops where you know exactly how many cycles are consumed per iteration. There is always a way, but it may not be pretty. –  RBerteig Oct 14 '10 at 8:40
    
Precisely, it may not always be pretty. But I wounder, aren't there any microcomputers where you can set an interrupt and issue hlt to save power? –  Frank Oct 14 '10 at 8:48
1  
@Frank: some have it. For instance, PIC32MX has 2 types of timers. Type A has its own oscillator, while B doesn't. Both permit you to select the prescaler. –  jweyrich Oct 14 '10 at 9:04
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For delays as large as one minute, sleep() is a nice choice.

If someday, you want to pause on delays smaller than one second, you may want to consider poll() with a timeout.

Both are POSIX.

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Try sleep(int number_of_seconds)

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sleep(int) works as a good delay. For a minute:

//Doing some stuff...
sleep(60); //Freeze for A minute
//Continue doing stuff...
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you can simply call delay() function. So if you want to delay the process in 3 seconds, call delay(3000)...

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If you are certain you want to wait and never get interrupted then use sleep in POSIX or Sleep in Windows. In POSIX sleep takes time in seconds so if you want the time to be shorter there are varieties like usleep() which uses microseconds. Sleep in Windows takes milliseconds, it is rare you need finer granularity than that.

It may be that you wish to wait a period of time but want to allow interrupts, maybe in the case of an emergency. sleep can be interrupted by signals but there is a better way of doing it in this case.

Therefore I actually found in practice what you do is wait for an event or a condition variable with a timeout.

In Windows your call is WaitForSingleObject. In POSIX it is pthread_cond_timedwait.

In Windows you can also use WaitForSingleObjectEx and then you can actually "interrupt" your thread with any queued task by calling QueueUserAPC. WaitForSingleObject(Ex) will return a code determining why it exited, so you will know when it returns a "TIMEDOUT" status that it did indeed timeout. You set the Event it is waiting for when you want it to terminate.

With pthread_cond_timedwait you can signal broadcast the condition variable. (If several threads are waiting on the same one, you will need to broadcast to wake them all up). Each time it loops it should check the condition. Your thread can get the current time and see if it has passed or it can look to see if some condition has been met to determine what to do. If you have some kind of queue you can check it. (Your thread will automatically have a mutex locked that it used to wait on the condition variable, so when it checks the condition it has sole access to it).

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system("timeout /t 60"); // waits 60s. this is only for windows vista,7,8
system("ping -n 60 127.0.0.1 >nul"); // waits 60s. for all windows
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Although many implementations have the time function return the current time in seconds, there is no guarantee that every implementation will do so (e.g. some may return milliseconds rather than seconds). As such, a more portable solution is to use the difftime function.

difftime is guaranteed by the C standard to return the difference in time in seconds between two time_t values. As such we can write a portable time delay function to which will run all implementations of the C standard.

#include <time.h>

void delay(double dly){
    /* save start time */
    const time_t start = time(NULL);

    time_t current;
    do{
        /* get current time */
        time(&current);

        /* break loop when the requested number of seconds have elapsed */
    }while(difftime(current, start) < dly);
}

One caveat with the time and difftime functions is that the C standard never specifies a granularity. Most implementations have a granularity of one second. While this is all right for delays lasting several seconds, our delay function may wait too long for delays lasting under one second.

There is a portable standard C alternative: the clock function.

The clock function returns the implementation’s best approximation to the processor time used by the program since the beginning of an implementation-defined era related only to the program invocation. To determine the time in seconds, the value returned by the clock function should be divided by the value of the macro CLOCKS_PER_SEC.

The clock function solution is quite similar to our time function solution:

#include <time.h>

void delay(double dly){
    /* save start clock tick */
    const clock_t start = clock();

    clock_t current;
    do{
        /* get current clock tick */
        current = clock();

        /* break loop when the requested number of seconds have elapsed */
    }while((double)(current-start)/CLOCKS_PER_SEC < sec);
}

There is a caveat in this case similar to that of time and difftime: the granularity of the clock function is left to the implementation. For example, a machines with 32-bit values for clock_t with a resolution in microseconds may end up wrapping the value returned by clock after 2147 seconds (about 36 minutes).

As such, consider using the time and difftime implementation of the delay function for delays lasting at least one second, and the clock implementation for delays lasting under one second.

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