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Animal

public abstract class Animal {
 String name;

 public Animal(String name) {
  this.name = name;
 }

}

Lion

public class Lion extends Animal {

 public Lion(String name) {
  super(name);
  // TODO Auto-generated constructor stub
 }

 public void roar() {
  System.out.println("Roar");
 }
}

Deer

public class Deer extends Animal {

 public Deer(String name) {
  super(name);
 }

 public void runAway() {
  System.out.println("Running...");
 }

}

TestAnimals

public class TestAnimals {
 public static void main(String[] args) {
  Animal lion = new Lion("Geo");
  Animal deer1 = new Deer("D1");
  Animal deer2 = new Deer("D2");

  List<Animal> li = new ArrayList<Animal>();
  li.add(lion);
  li.add(deer1);
  li.add(deer2);
  for (Animal a : li) {
   if (a instanceof Lion) {
    Lion l = (Lion) a;
    l.roar();
   }
   if (a instanceof Deer) {
    Deer l = (Deer) a;
    l.runAway();
   }

  }
 }
}

Is there a better way to iterate through the list without having to cast ?In the above case it seem's ok but if you have many extensions of the base class then we'll need that many if block too.Is there a design pattern or principle to address this problem ?

share|improve this question
    
Do the methods have to have different names (roar, runAway)? The idea of polymorphism is having the same methods in the subclasses, with the JVM calling the appropiate one. – dariopy Oct 14 '10 at 7:04
    
Is there a better way to do a wrong thing? – InsertNickHere Oct 14 '10 at 7:10
1  
What's the intent of the code in TestAnimals? Is it 'do the animal-specific thing to each animal'? Or 'roar all Lions, runAway all Deer' and nothing more? – AakashM Oct 14 '10 at 7:13
up vote 26 down vote accepted

An elegant way of avoiding instanceof without inventing some new artificial method in the base class (with a non-descriptive name such as performAction or doWhatYouAreSupposedToDo) is to use the visitor pattern. Here is an example:

Animal

import java.util.*;

abstract class Animal {
    String name;

    public Animal(String name) {
        this.name = name;
    }

    public abstract void accept(AnimalVisitor av);  // <-- Open up for visitors.

}

Lion and Deer

class Lion extends Animal {
    public Lion(String name) {
        super(name);
    }
    public void roar() {
        System.out.println("Roar");
    }

    public void accept(AnimalVisitor av) {
        av.visit(this);                            // <-- Accept and call visit.
    }
}


class Deer extends Animal {

    public Deer(String name) {
        super(name);
    }

    public void runAway() {
        System.out.println("Running...");
    }

    public void accept(AnimalVisitor av) {
        av.visit(this);                            // <-- Accept and call visit.
    }

}

Visitor

interface AnimalVisitor {
    void visit(Lion l);
    void visit(Deer d);
}

class ActionVisitor implements AnimalVisitor {

    public void visit(Deer d) {
        d.runAway();
    }

    public void visit(Lion l) {
        l.roar();
    }
}

TestAnimals

public class TestAnimals {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Animal lion = new Lion("Geo");
        Animal deer1 = new Deer("D1");
        Animal deer2 = new Deer("D2");

        List<Animal> li = new ArrayList<Animal>();
        li.add(lion);
        li.add(deer1);
        li.add(deer2);
        for (Animal a : li)
            a.accept(new ActionVisitor());         // <-- Accept / visit.
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, tend to agree. I can't resist voting up visitor. I love it, but I think you do more than I do. +1 – Adeel Ansari Oct 14 '10 at 7:11
    
Its regarding the description you added later, with visitor adding any new Animal will require modification of AnimalVisitor. Whereas, the other option is good to go without this kinda modification. What say you? – Adeel Ansari Oct 14 '10 at 7:17
    
@Adeel Ansari, That a good point. It depends on the situation I'd say. It depends on if you want the specific action-implementations to be collected in one class, or if you want them scattered in the different classes. Both are preferable in different situations. In this scenario however, roar and runAway are so different that I wouldn't want to invent a common name for the two. – aioobe Oct 14 '10 at 7:22
    
Wouldn't it be possible to do the implementation of the accept method in the parent class (Animal)? – Pau Oct 14 '10 at 14:53
    
No, unfortunately not. This is because the method signature is determined in compile time, while the target type is in this case determined at runtime. – aioobe Oct 14 '10 at 14:58

Animal

public abstract class Animal {
 String name;

 public Animal(String name) {
  this.name = name;
 }

 public abstract void exhibitNaturalBehaviour();

}

Lion

public class Lion extends Animal {

 public Lion(String name) {
  super(name);
 }

 public void exhibitNaturalBehaviour() {
  System.out.println("Roar");
 }
}

Deer

public class Deer extends Animal {

 public Deer(String name) {
  super(name);
 }

 public void exhibitNaturalBehaviour() {
  System.out.println("Running...");
 }

}

TestAnimals

public class TestAnimals {
 public static void main(String[] args) {

  Animal[] animalArr = {new Lion("Geo"), new Deer("D1"), new Deer("D2")};
  for (Animal a : animalArr) {
     a.exhibitNaturalBehaviour();    
  }

 }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Also, this could easily be extended to use a strategy pattern. Supplying in the action to take place (with a separate setter, or in constructor) upon doWhatYouSupposeToDo(). Although it might be better to call it act() or perform() – Steven Oct 14 '10 at 7:14
    
@Steven: I tend to agree, with both of your suggestions. I just came up with this name arbitrarily. Yes, it sounds stupid and cute ;D. – Adeel Ansari Oct 14 '10 at 7:22
3  
Proposed alternative method name: exhibitNaturalBehaviour() – mikera Oct 14 '10 at 10:15
    
@Mikera: Modified to rename the method. Thanks. – Adeel Ansari Nov 8 '10 at 17:25
    
It's just an example of the old good polymorphism. And it's cool, unless you want to have some external behaviour that is not nailed to your data-structure. – Denis Kulagin Nov 2 '15 at 12:49

Yes provide a method called action() in abstract class , implement it in both of the child class, one will roar other will runaway

share|improve this answer

If your method is not polymorphic you can't do without the cast. To make it polymorphic, declare a method in the base class and override it in the descendant classes.

share|improve this answer

Here you have a List of animals. Usually when you have a list of Objects, all these objects must be able to do the same thing without being casted.

So the best two solutions are :

  • Having a common method for the two concrete classes (so defined as abstract in Animal)
  • Separate Lion from Deer from the start, and have two different lists.
share|improve this answer

Pattern matching support in the language eliminates the need for the ugly visitor pattern.

See this Scala code for example:

abstract class Animal(name: String)

class Lion(name: String) extends Animal(name) {
  def roar() {
    println("Roar!")
  }
}

class Deer(name: String) extends Animal(name) {
  def runAway() {
    println("Running!")
  }
}

object TestAnimals {
  def main(args: Array[String]) {
    val animals = List(new Lion("Geo"), new Deer("D1"), new Deer("D2"))
    for(animal <- animals) animal match {
      case l: Lion => l.roar()
      case d: Deer => d.runAway()
      case _       => ()
    }
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I don't if it work's but it looks nice. – Emil Oct 14 '10 at 7:42
    
why is both the case's 'a' ? – Emil Oct 14 '10 at 7:43
2  
@Emil: It works. It's tested. :) – Eric Grindt Oct 14 '10 at 7:44
    
Can you explain a bit how this works.i'm not into scala. – Emil Oct 14 '10 at 7:45
2  
@Emil: It's exactly equivalent to your Java way (instanceof and then cast). Pattern matching just makes it syntactically nicer. :) – Eric Grindt Oct 14 '10 at 7:46

It turns out that instanceof is faster than the visitor pattern presented above; I think this should make us question, is the visitor pattern really more elegant than instanceof when it's doing the same thing more slowly with more lines of code?

Here's my test. I compared 3 methods: the visitor pattern above, instanceof, and an explicit type field in Animal.

OS: Windows 7 Enterprise SP1, 64-bit
Processor: Intel(R) Core(TM) i7 CPU 860 @ 2.80 GHz 2.93 GHz
RAM: 8.00 GB
JRE: 1.7.0_21-b11, 32-bit

import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.List;

public class AnimalTest1 {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Animal lion = new Lion("Geo");
        Animal deer1 = new Deer("D1");
        Animal deer2 = new Deer("D2");

        List<Animal> li = new ArrayList<Animal>();
        li.add(lion);
        li.add(deer1);
        li.add(deer2);

        int reps = 10000000;

        long start, elapsed;

        start = System.nanoTime();
        for (int i = 0; i < reps; i++) {
            for (Animal a : li)
                a.accept(new ActionVisitor()); // <-- Accept / visit.
        }
        elapsed = System.nanoTime() - start;

        System.out.println("Visitor took " + elapsed + " ns");

        start = System.nanoTime();
        for (int i = 0; i < reps; i++) {
            for (Animal a : li) {
                if (a instanceof Lion) {
                    ((Lion) a).roar();
                } else if (a instanceof Deer) {
                    ((Deer) a).runAway();
                }
            }
        }
        elapsed = System.nanoTime() - start;

        System.out.println("instanceof took " + elapsed + " ns");

        start = System.nanoTime();
        for (int i = 0; i < reps; i++) {
            for (Animal a : li) {
                switch (a.type) {
                case Animal.LION_TYPE:
                    ((Lion) a).roar();
                    break;
                case Animal.DEER_TYPE:
                    ((Deer) a).runAway();
                    break;
                }
            }
        }
        elapsed = System.nanoTime() - start;

        System.out.println("type constant took " + elapsed + " ns");
    }
}

abstract class Animal {
    public static final int LION_TYPE = 0;
    public static final int DEER_TYPE = 1;

    String name;
    public final int type;

    public Animal(String name, int type) {
        this.name = name;
        this.type = type;
    }

    public abstract void accept(AnimalVisitor av); // <-- Open up for visitors.
}

class Lion extends Animal {
    public Lion(String name) {
        super(name, LION_TYPE);
    }

    public void roar() {
        // System.out.println("Roar");
    }

    public void accept(AnimalVisitor av) {
        av.visit(this); // <-- Accept and call visit.
    }
}

class Deer extends Animal {

    public Deer(String name) {
        super(name, DEER_TYPE);
    }

    public void runAway() {
        // System.out.println("Running...");
    }

    public void accept(AnimalVisitor av) {
        av.visit(this); // <-- Accept and call visit.
    }

}

interface AnimalVisitor {
    void visit(Lion l);

    void visit(Deer d);
}

class ActionVisitor implements AnimalVisitor {

    public void visit(Deer d) {
        d.runAway();
    }

    public void visit(Lion l) {
        l.roar();
    }
}

Test results:

Visitor took 920842192 ns
instanceof took 511837398 ns
type constant took 535296640 ns

This visitor pattern introduces 2 extra method calls that are unnecessary with instanceof. This is probably why it's slower.

Not that performance is the only consideration, but notice how 2 instanceofs are faster than even a 2-case switch statement. Plenty of people have worried about the performance of instanceof, but this should put the worry to rest.

As a Java Developer, I feel frustrated when people have a dogmatic attitude about avoiding the use of instanceof, because there have been several times in my work I wanted to clean up or write new clean code by using instanceof, but coworkers/superiors didn't approve of this approach , because they have more or less blindly accepted the idea that instanceof should never be used. I feel frustrated because this point is often driven home with toy examples that don't reflect real business concerns.

Whenever you pursue modular software design, there will always be times when type-dependent decisions need to be isolated from the types in question, so that the types have as few dependencies as possible.

This visitor pattern doesn't break modularity, but it's not a superior alternative to instanceof.

share|improve this answer
    
I think it's fair to bring this up. However in the vast majority cases, ease of maintenance will far outweigh a modest performance gain. With the visitor pattern, adding a new type of animal will expose immediately any places that need to be updated, as any previously existing visitors will now fail to compile. If-else chains using instanceof will happily compile and there is a good chance that you will not discover you have effected the foreign module until the incorrect behavior is noticed. – derekv Apr 10 '14 at 21:27
    
@derekv Where do you think instanceof is more appropriate? Say that java.lang.Number had been written with a visitor pattern. Would it really be worth writing a visitor every time you want to check the type of a Number instance? Especially if you only wanted to do something if it was a Double, for instance? Also, if you're making a library, and intend for users to be able to extend a type in your library for which you've created a visitor pattern, users of your library would not be able to add a method for their new type to the visitor interface in your library, unless they want to fork. – Andy Apr 13 '14 at 18:13
    
I don't think there's one solution that will work best for every situation, what I advocate is a best effort in knowing what tools you have, and make a decision which best meets the needs of the problem being solved, and respect for those who will maintain the code later. Almost everywhere I've seen instanceof in application code it's a smell and not a performance critical loop or such. I'm aware of several problems with the visitor pattern as well. As for your library question, I'd need to see some specifics, but it's an interesting point, it might make a good separate question. – derekv Apr 14 '14 at 20:53
1  
@derekv I've definitely seen some instanceof code smells too. I didn't bring up performance because I think it's a big deal, more because there's a historical fear that instanceof is inefficient underlying some of the arguments against it, and I wanted to dispel that fear. – Andy Apr 15 '14 at 5:04

Consider adding an interface for the action (Roar, Run away, etc) which is set on the animal in the constructor. Then have an abstract method such as act() on the Animal class which gets called similar to what Adeel has.

This will let you swap in actions to act out via a field at any time.

share|improve this answer

The simplest approach is to have the super class implement a default behaviour.

public enum AnimalBehaviour { 
     Deer { public void runAway() { System.out.println("Running..."); } },
     Lion { public void roar() { System.out.println("Roar"); } }
     public void runAway() { } 
     public void roar() { }
 } 

 public class Animal {
     private final String name;
     private final AnimalBehaviour behaviour;
     public Animal(String name, AnimalBehaviour behaviour) {
         this.name = name;
         this.behaviour = behaviour;
     }
     public void runAway() { behaviour.runAway(); } 
     public void roar() { behaviour.roar(); }
  }

 public class TestAnimals { 
   public static void main(String... args) { 
     Animal[] animals = { 
       new Animal("Geo", AnimalBehaviour.Lion), 
       new Animal("Bambi", AnimalBehaviour.Deer), 
       new Animal("D2", AnimalBehaviour.Deer) 
     }; 

     for (Animal a : animals) {
       a.roar(); 
       a.runAway(); 
     } 
   }
 }
share|improve this answer
    
good approach.i like it. – Emil Oct 15 '10 at 6:41
    
The use of Enum in this case is not very flexible, as there will only exist a single Deer behaviour instance. (The Deer behaviour can thus not, for instance, have a reference to the related deer-object, as the behaviour is shared with other Deer instances.) Besides, it's not very elegant to be able to write myDeer.roar(). – aioobe Oct 15 '10 at 7:04
    
@aioobe:yes your right.I didn't think much about that. – Emil Oct 15 '10 at 7:38
    
You should only need one Deer behviour as it is intended to describe all deers. If you need a more complicated structure you can't use enum alone. But I wouldn't start assuming a problem is more complicated than it needs to be. You should always strive for the simplest solution which meets your needs. – Peter Lawrey Oct 16 '10 at 9:18

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