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I have a field (column in Oracle) called X that has values like "a1b2c3", "abc", "1ab", "123", "156"

how do I write an sql query that returns me only the X that hold pure numerical values = no letters? from the example above would be „123“ and „156“

select X from myTable where ...??

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6 Answers 6

The complete list of the regexp_like and other regexp functions in Oracle 11.1:

http://66.221.222.85/reference/regexp.html

In your example:

SELECT X FROM test WHERE REGEXP_LIKE(X, '^[[:digit:]]$');

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This will not work, it'll report rows that have a digit anywhere. You need to use anchors. –  codaddict Oct 14 '10 at 10:44
    
I've fixed it :) –  Siggi Oct 14 '10 at 10:54
1  
This page 404s. –  Dan Atkinson May 2 '13 at 10:28
    
docs.oracle.com/cd/B19306_01/appdev.102/b14251/adfns_regexp.htm has some useful info –  Chris Jul 17 '13 at 21:14

You can use the REGEXP_LIKE function as:

SELECT X 
FROM myTable 
WHERE REGEXP_LIKE(X, '^[[:digit:]]+$');

Sample run:

SQL> SELECT X FROM SO;

X
--------------------
12c
123
abc
a12

SQL> SELECT X  FROM SO WHERE REGEXP_LIKE(X, '^[[:digit:]]+$');

X
--------------------
123

SQL> 
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You can use regexp in Oracle 10i as well –  andr Oct 14 '10 at 12:47
    
@andr: Thanks :) I tried it on a 11g box, so was not sure when did Oracle introduce regex. –  codaddict Oct 14 '10 at 12:48
    
This test have the advantage of stripping the null values compared to LENGTH(TRIM(TRANSLATE(string1, ' +-.0123456789', ' '))). –  Jean-Philippe Martin Nov 1 '12 at 14:31

You can use following command -

LENGTH(TRIM(TRANSLATE(string1, '+-.0123456789', '')))

This will return NULL if your string1 is Numeric

your query would be -

select * from tablename 
where LENGTH(TRIM(TRANSLATE(X, '+-.0123456789', ''))) is null
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1  
Cite from official SQL Reference documentation: "You cannot use an empty string for to_string to remove all characters in from_ string from the return value". So you can't use empty string as the third argument in TRANSLATE(string1, '+-.0123456789', '') –  andr Oct 14 '10 at 12:49

If the only characters to consider are letters then you can do:

select X from myTable where upper(X) = lower(X)

But of course that won't filter out other characters, just letters.

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+1, this is nice. –  codaddict Oct 14 '10 at 11:45

If you use Oracle 10 or higher you can use regexp functions as codaddict suggested. In earlier versions translate function will help you:

select * from tablename  where translate(x, '.1234567890', '.') is null;

More info about Oracle translate function can be found here or in official documentation "SQL Reference"

UPD: If you have signs or spaces in your numbers you can add "+-" characters to the second parameter of translate function.

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What about 1.1E10, +1, -0, etc? Parsing all possible numbers is trickier than many people think. If you want to include as many numbers are possible you should use the to_number function in a PL/SQL function. From http://www.oracle-developer.net/content/utilities/is_number.sql:

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION is_number (str_in IN VARCHAR2) RETURN NUMBER IS
   n NUMBER;
BEGIN
   n := TO_NUMBER(str_in);
   RETURN 1;
EXCEPTION
   WHEN VALUE_ERROR THEN
      RETURN 0;
END;
/
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+1 best answer. –  Jeffrey Kemp Oct 16 '10 at 3:22
    
This addresses a different question. He didn't say numbers, he said digits. –  EvilTeach Feb 17 '12 at 16:51
    
I interpreted "numeric values" to mean "number". I was thinking of the context of converting strings to numbers; a situation where you really need to use PL/SQL to prevent out-of-order execution causing "invalid number" errors. If he really just want to check digits, then you're right, this won't work. –  Jon Heller Feb 18 '12 at 2:37

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