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The Problem I need to write a simple software that, giving certain constraints, appends to a list a series of files. The user could choose between two "types" of directory: one with a * wildcard meaning it should also explore subdirectories and the classic one without wildcards that just get files present in that directory.

What I'm doing

Right now I'm doing the stupidest thing:

import java.io.File;

public class Eseguibile {

    private static void displayIt(File node){

        System.out.println(node.getAbsoluteFile());

        if(node.isDirectory()){
            String[] subNote = node.list();
            for(String filename : subNote){
                displayIt(new File(node, filename));
            }
        }
    }

    public static void main(String[] args){
        System.out.println("ciao");

        displayIt( new File("/home/dierre/") );

    }

}

I do not need to build a tree because I just need the files list so I was thinking maybe there's a more efficient way to do it.

I was reading about the TreeModel but, as I understand it, it's just an interface to implement a Jtree.

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2  
Is there a reason you choose not to use recursion? in some cases its faster than doing it without. –  etbal Oct 14 '10 at 10:58
    
Because I don't know how many directories will be in a wildecarded directory so I was thinking about memory issues. –  dierre Oct 14 '10 at 11:02
    
Did you check stackoverflow.com/questions/1086907/… –  Jayan Oct 14 '10 at 11:04
2  
I think there is actually no better solution than recursion here - if you are really expecting to run into memory issues what seems to be really unlikely giving the fact that you work on directories here you could limit the recursion depth. But first I would check the maximum possible directory depth of your filesystem - chances are good that this value already renders your worries unfounded. –  hackbert Oct 14 '10 at 11:11
1  
What about using something like depth or breadth first? Is that even a solution for what I'm doing? I'm not looking for a single goal but multiple goals. I have to explore always the entire tree. –  dierre Oct 14 '10 at 11:19

6 Answers 6

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Right now I'm doing the stupidest thing ...

Recursion is neither "stupid" or necessarily inefficient. Indeed in this particular case, a recursive solution is likely to be more efficient than a non-recursive one. And of course, the recursive solution is easier to code and to understand than the alternatives.

The only potential problem with recursion is that you could overflow the stack if the directory tree is pathologically deep.

If you really want to avoid recursion, then the natural way to do it is to use a "stack of list of File" data structure. Each place where you would have recursed, you push the list containing the current directory's (remaining) File objects onto the stack, read the new directory and start working on them. Then when you are finished, pop the stack and continue with the parent directory. This will give you a depth-first traversal. If you want a breadth-first traversal, use a "queue of File" data structure instead of a stack.

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Stupid meaning the first thing I thought to do. Without deeper analisys. –  dierre Oct 14 '10 at 13:21
2  
Instinctive solutions are not necessarily stupid either :-) –  Stephen C Oct 15 '10 at 11:54

Recursion can always be transformed into a loop.
A quick and dirty possible solution (not tested) follows :

private static void displayDirectory(File node){
    ArraList directories = new ArrayList();
    if (node.isDirectory())
       directories.append (node);    
    // Iterate over the directory list
    Iterator it = directories.iterator();
    while(it.hasNext()){
       File dir  = (File)it.next();           
       // get childs
       String[] subNote = dir.list();
       for(String filename : subNote){
          subNode = new File(node, filename);
          // display current child name
          System.out.println(subNode.getAbsoluteFile());
          // if directory : add current child to the list of dir to process
          if (subnode.isDirectory()){
             directories.append(subNode);
          }
       }
    }
}

please note that the source node should be a directory for anything to be displayed.
Also, this is a breadth-first display. if you want a depth first, you should change the "append" to put the file it just after the current node in the array list.

i'm not sure about the memory consomation, however.
Regards
Guillaume

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I am a real novice, but after working for a week on this problem... I have a clean solution... thanks for all the help from PATRY and etbal.

public class Recur {
    // Process only directories under dir

File dir;
static DirectoryComponent allDirectory;

    public Recur(File dir, DirectoryComponent allDirectory) {
    // TODO Auto-generated constructor stub
        this.dir = dir;
}

    public static DirectoryComponent Recur(File dir, DirectoryComponent allDirectory) {
        String file;
        String path;

         File firstDir = new File(dir.getPath());
         file = firstDir.getName();
         path = firstDir.getPath();

        if (dir.isDirectory()) {

            file = firstDir.getName();
            path = firstDir.getPath();
            DirectoryComponent directory = new Directory(file, path);
            allDirectory.add(directory);

            String [] subNote = dir.list();
            for(String filename : subNote){
                File subNode = new File(firstDir, filename);

                // store current child name

                    file = subNode.getName();
                    path = subNode.getPath();
                    directory.add(new FileItem(file,path));         
            }

            String[] children = dir.list();
            for (int i=0; i<children.length; i++) {
                Recur(new File(dir, children[i]), allDirectory);
            }
        }

        return allDirectory;
    }
}
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If you choose to use recursion, I found an example that may be close to the one you are currently using as to eliminate any ambiguity .

// Process only directories under dir
public static void visitAllDirs(File dir) {
    if (dir.isDirectory()) {
        process(dir);

        String[] children = dir.list();
        for (int i=0; i<children.length; i++) {
            visitAllDirs(new File(dir, children[i]));
        }
    }
}

This is a very simple example, the process() can be where you do your handling or operations on the directory.

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PARTY, thank you for advice. I transformed a little bit your code, that's what I've got

private ArrayList<File> displayDirectory(File node){
ArrayList<File> FileList = new ArrayList();
ArrayList <File>directories = new <File>ArrayList();
if (node.isDirectory())
   directories.add(node);
// Iterate over the directory list
Iterator it = directories.iterator();
for (int i = 0 ; i < directories.size();i++){
   File dir  =  directories.get(i);
   // get childs
   String[] subNode = dir.list();
   for(int j = 0 ; j < subNode.length;j++){
      File F = new File( directories.get(i).getAbsolutePath(), subNode[j]);
      // display current child name
    //  System.out.println(F.getAbsoluteFile());
      // if directory : add current child to the list of dir to process
      if (F.isDirectory()) directories.add(F);           
        else   FileList.add(F);
      }
}   
return FileList;
}
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My iterative solution:

  ArrayDeque<File> stack = new ArrayDeque<File>();

    stack.push(new File("<path>"));

    int n = 0;

    while(!stack.isEmpty()){

        n++;
        File file = stack.pop();

        System.err.println(file);

        File[] files = file.listFiles();

        for(File f: files){

            if(f.isHidden()) continue;

            if(f.isDirectory()){
                stack.push(f);
                continue;
            }

            n++;
            System.out.println(f);


        }

    }

    System.out.println(n);
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