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I am currently trying to pass a matrix file that is 32 by 48 to a multi-dimensional array in Perl. I am able to access all of the values but am having issues accessing a specific value. Any help would be greatly appreciated. I have put a link to the data set as well as the code I have below.

Here is a link to the data set: http://paste-it.net/public/x1d5301/

Here is what I have for code right now.

#!/usr/bin/perl

open FILE, "testset.txt" or die $!;
my @lines = <FILE>;

my $size = scalar @lines;

my @matrix = (1 .. 32);
my $i = 0;
my $j = 0;
my @micro;

foreach ($matrix)
{

foreach ($lines)
{
    push @{ $micro[$matrix]}, $lines;
}
}
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1  
lol for use English; –  Zaid Oct 14 '10 at 13:29
    
just ask the question and cut all else. –  Hermann Ingjaldsson Oct 14 '10 at 13:37
    
@Zaid I removed use English –  Alos Jan 5 '11 at 13:27

5 Answers 5

up vote 7 down vote accepted

It doesn't seem you understand that $matrix only indicates @matrix when it is immediately followed by an array indexer: [ $slot ]. Otherwise, $matrix is a completely different variable from @matrix (and both different from %matrix as well). See perldata.

#!/usr/bin/perl
use English;

Don't! use English--that way!

This brings in $MATCH, $PREMATCH, and $POSTMATCH and incurrs the dreaded $&, $`, $' penalty. You should wait until you're using an English variable and then just import that.

open FILE, "testset.txt" or die $!;

Two things: 1) use lexical file handles, and 2) use the three-arg open.

my @lines = <FILE>;

As long as I'm picking: Don't slurp big files. (Not the case here, but it's a good warning.)

my $size = scalar @lines;

my @matrix = (1 .. 32);
my $i = 0;
my $j = 0;
my @micro;

I see we're at the "PROFIT!!" stage here...

foreach ($matrix) {

You don't have a variable $matrix you have a variable @matrix.

    foreach ($lines) {

Same thing is true with $lines.

        push @{ $micro[$matrix]}, $lines;
    }
}

Rewrite:

use strict;
use warnings;
use English qw<$OS_ERROR>; # $!
open( my $input, '<', 'testset.txt' ) or die $OS_ERROR;

# I'm going to assume space-delimited, since you don't show
my @matrix;
# while ( defined( $_ = <$input> ))...
while ( <$input> ) {
    chomp; # strip off the record separator
    # load each slot of @matrix with a reference to an array filled with
    # the line split by spaces.
    push @matrix, [ split ]; # split = split( ' ', $_ )
}
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@Axeman FYI: split with no arguments is split ' ' not split /\s+/ –  Sinan Ünür Oct 14 '10 at 14:17
    
@Sinan: Not on redhat Perl 5.8.7 or Strawberry Perl 5.12.1:perl -MSmart::Comments $_ = '1 2 3 4 5'; my @a = split; ### @a ### @a: [ ### '1', ### '2', ### '3', ### '4', ### '5' ### ] –  Axeman Oct 14 '10 at 14:31
1  
@Sinan, well HTML compressed the spaces, but there are all sorts of spaces and tabs in there. :/ –  Axeman Oct 14 '10 at 14:34
    
@Axeman: can you explain what you mean? split with no arguments is definitely split ' ', not split /\s+/. The two differ in how leading spaces are treated. –  ysth Oct 14 '10 at 14:50
    
@Axeman See the CW answer I added to illustrate the difference. –  Sinan Ünür Oct 14 '10 at 15:01

If you are going to be doing quite a bit of math, you might consider PDL (the Perl Data Language). You can easily set up your matrix and before operations on it:

use 5.010;

use PDL;
use PDL::Matrix;

my @rows;
while( <DATA> ) {
    chomp;
    my @row = split /\s+/;
    push @rows, \@row;
    }

my $a = PDL::Matrix->pdl( \@rows );
say "Start ", $a;

$a->index2d( 1, 2 ) .= 999;
say "(1,2) to 999 ", $a;

$a++;
say "Increment all ", $a;

__DATA__
1 2 3
4 5 6
7 8 9
2 3 4

The output shows the matrix evolution:

Start 
[
 [1 2 3]
 [4 5 6]
 [7 8 9]
 [2 3 4]
]

(1,2) to 999 
[
 [  1   2   3]
 [  4   5 999]
 [  7   8   9]
 [  2   3   4]
]

Increment all 
[
 [   2    3    4]
 [   5    6 1000]
 [   8    9   10]
 [   3    4    5]
]

There's quite a bit of power to run arbitrary and complex operations on every member of the matrix just like I added 1 to every member. You completely skip the looping acrobatics.

Not only that, PDL does a lot of special stuff to make math really fast and to have a low memory footprint. Some of the stuff you want to do may already be implemented.

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You probably need to chomp the values:

chomp( my @lines = <FILE> );
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I am making this CW because its sole purpose is to clarify a tangential point I made in my comment to @Axeman's answer. See perldoc -f split:

A split on /\s+/ is like a split(' ') except that any leading whitespace produces a null first field. A split with no arguments really does a split(' ', $_) internally.

#!/usr/bin/perl

use YAML;

$_ = "\t1 2\n3\f4\r5\n";

print Dump { 'split'       => [ split       ] },
           { "split ' '"   => [ split ' '   ] },
           { 'split /\s+/' => [ split /\s+/ ] }
           ;

Output:

---
split:
  - 1
  - 2
  - 3
  - 4
  - 5
---
split ' ':
  - 1
  - 2
  - 3
  - 4
  - 5
---
split /\s+/:
  - ''
  - 1
  - 2
  - 3
  - 4
  - 5
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I see the question is pretty old, but as the author has just edited the question, perhaps this is still of interest. Also the link to the data is dead, but since other answers use space as the separator, I will too.

This answer demonstrates Tie::Array::CSV which allows random access to a CSV (or other file parsable with Text::CSV).

#!/usr/bin/env perl

use strict;
use warnings;

use Tie::Array::CSV;

## put DATA into temporary file
## if not using DATA, put file name in $file
use File::Temp ();
my $file = File::Temp->new();
print $file <DATA>;
##


tie my @data, 'Tie::Array::CSV', $file, { 
  text_csv => {
    sep_char => " ",
  },
};

print $data[1][2];

__DATA__
1 2 3 4 5
6 7 8 9 1
2 3 4 5 6
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