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I am wanting to generate a random array of sequences that repeat and only use each number once. For example, given a range of 0-9 with 2 different seeds you might get

Seed 1: 7 3 5 9 0 8 1 2 6 4 | 7 3 5 9 0 8 1 2 6 4 | 7 3 5 9 0 8 1 2 6 4
Seed 2: 2 5 7 1 4 9 6 8 3 0 | 2 5 7 1 4 9 6 8 3 0 | 2 5 7 1 4 9 6 8 3 0

From what I understand, a Linear Congruential Random Number Generator or LCRNG or LCG can give me this http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Linear_congruential_generator

Any idea if an implementation exists in C# or how I would get started with writing one.

How does a Mersenne Twister differ from an LCG?

Not sure all of my questions are answered, but here is what I ended up using. Because I am bounding the sample size to the range of values from max to min, I am selecting a different prime number that stays static as long as the same initial seed is given. I do this because I want the same sequence given the same seed and the same min/max bounds for repeatability of testing.

Please critique anything I do here, this is just what I came up with in a jiffy:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;

namespace FULLCYCLE
{
    public class RandomNumber
    {
        private int _value;
        private int _prime;
        private static List<int> primes = new List<int>()
        {
            11,
            23,
            47,
            97,
            797,
            1597,
            6421,
            25717,
            51437,
            102877,
            411527,
            823117,
            1646237,
            3292489,
            6584983,
            13169977,
            26339969,
            52679969,
            105359939,
            210719881,
            421439783,
            842879579,
            1685759167
        };

        public RandomNumber( int seed )
        {
            _prime = primes[seed%primes.Count];
            _value = seed;
        }

        public int Next( int min, int max )
        {
            int maxrate = (max-min+1);
            if (_value > maxrate)
            {
                _value = _value % maxrate;
            }

            _value = (_value + _prime) % maxrate;
            return _value + min;
        }
    }
}
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The page you linked give the information you need. The equation is right on the page. –  JoshD Oct 14 '10 at 16:31

2 Answers 2

Why not just use the existing Random class and a Knuth shuffle on your input sequence?

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1  
From what I understand of the Knuth shuffle, if I wanted random numbers between 0 and 1 billion, then I would need to store this whole array in memory and shuffle it in memory. With an LCG it seems I can accomplish the same with very little memory. –  esac Oct 14 '10 at 16:36
1  
The LCG will also not guarantee that the numbers do not repeat. You could get 100 five times in a row depending on your seed. Without knowing what numbers have already been yielded how do you expect to generate each number only once? –  Ron Warholic Oct 14 '10 at 16:49
1  
If you setup the input parameters of the LCG correctly then you are guaranteed that it will generate all possible numbers in the range before repeating itself. –  LukeH Oct 14 '10 at 17:12
    
@LukeH- as shown by en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Full_cycle (which ironically includes C# code to do what the OP would like). However this requires constraints on the seed and sample size (if the increment prime divides the sample size you will get repeats). –  Ron Warholic Oct 14 '10 at 17:34

Regarding your edit, there are several problems with your LCG as a random number generator...

  1. It can produce obvious patterns:

    // generates 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 0, 1, 2
    var rng = new RandomNumber(42);
    for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++) Console.WriteLine(rng.Next(0, 9));
    
  2. It can repeat itself:

    // generates 579, 579, 579, 579, 579, 579, 579, 579, 579, 579
    var rng = new RandomNumber(123);
    for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++) Console.WriteLine(rng.Next(456, 51892));
    

There are many other seed/min/max combinations that will generate problematic results.

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