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Consider the following code:

try:
    raise Exception("a")
except:
    try:
        raise Exception("b")
    finally:
        raise

This will raise Exception: a. I expected it to raise Exception: b (need I explain why?). Why does the final raise raise the original exception rather than (what I thought) was the last exception raised?

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7  
Python 3.1 raises both. –  KennyTM Oct 14 '10 at 17:04
1  
Ah. I should have mentioned I'm on Python 2.6. –  wilhelmtell Oct 14 '10 at 17:06
1  
Just out of curiosity: C# compiler on same combination says "Error: A throw statement with no arguments is not allowed in a finally clause that is nested inside the nearest enclosing catch clause" (throw == raise, catch == except). No ambiguity! –  Andrey Oct 14 '10 at 17:10
    
@Andrey but, I wouldn't expect the code to pose ambiguity. I expected the second exception to shadow the first. I used to think raise refers to the last exception thrown. I just learnt I was wrong. –  wilhelmtell Oct 14 '10 at 17:13
    
@Andrey What was your question? –  aaronasterling Oct 14 '10 at 20:50

2 Answers 2

up vote 13 down vote accepted

On python2.6

I guess, you are expecting the finally block to be tied with the "try" block where you raise the exception "B". The finally block is attached to the first "try" block.

If you added an except block in the inner try block, then the finally block will raise exception B.

try:
  raise Exception("a")
except:
  try:
    raise Exception("b")
  except:
    pass
  finally:
    raise

Output:

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "test.py", line 5, in <module>
    raise Exception("b")
Exception: b

Another variation that explains whats happening here

try:
  raise Exception("a")
except:
  try:
    raise Exception("b")
  except:
    raise

Output:

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "test.py", line 7, in <module>
    raise Exception("b")
Exception: b

If you see here, replacing the finally block with except does raise the exception B.

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I have come to the same conclusion. –  Klaus Byskov Pedersen Oct 14 '10 at 17:08
    
Indeed, this works! I'd have never guessed. Is this documented somewhere? Is this a feature or is it a necessity that comes from issues in the grammar? –  wilhelmtell Oct 14 '10 at 17:10
    
Why doesn't the second exception merely shadow the first? I wish Python would err for syntax, or at least warn me about this. –  wilhelmtell Oct 14 '10 at 17:17
10  
wilhelmtell: raise is re-raising the last exception you caught, not the last exception you raised. If you try raise by itself after throwing an exception and you haven't previously caught any exceptions, you'll get a TypeError since there's nothing to re-raise. –  Wooble Oct 14 '10 at 17:24
    
@wilhelmtell: I guess the doc may provide some answer to this. This does seem to have been corrected in Python 3. The behavior is different. Link : docs.python.org/reference/compound_stmts.html#the-try-statement –  pyfunc Oct 14 '10 at 17:26

Raise is re-raising the last exception you caught, not the last exception you raised

(reposted from comments for clarity)

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