Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am calling a method that returns a List variable that contains a c# Anonymous Type objects. For example:

List<object> list = new List<object>();
foreach ( Contact c in allContacts ) {
    list.Add( new {
        ContactID = c.ContactID,
        FullName = c.FullName
    });
}
return list;

How do I reference this type properties in the code I am working on like for example

foreach ( object o in list ) {
    Console.WriteLine( o.ContactID );
}

I know that my sample is not possible, I have only wrote that way to say that I need to identify each property of the anonymous type exactly.

Thanks!

Solution:

Not just one of the answer is correct and/or suggest a working solution. I have ended up to using Option 3 of Greg answer. And I learned something very interesting regarding the dynamic in .NET 4.0!

share|improve this question
    
possible duplicate of Accessing C# Anonymous Type Objects –  nawfal Jun 28 at 7:52

7 Answers 7

up vote 26 down vote accepted

You can't return a list of an anonymous type, it will have to be a list of object. Thus you will lose the type information.

Option 1
Don't use an anonymous type. If you are trying to use an anonymous type in more than one method, then create a real class.

Option 2
Don't downcast your anonymous type to object. (must be in one method)

var list = allContacts
             .Select(c => new { c.ContactID, c.FullName })
             .ToList();

foreach (var o in list) {
    Console.WriteLine(o.ContactID);
}

Option 3
Use the dynamic keyword. (.NET 4 required)

foreach (dynamic o in list) {
    Console.WriteLine(o.ContactID);
}

Option 4
Use some dirty reflection.

share|improve this answer
1  
Option 5. Return a List of two-item Tuples (ex: List<Tuple<int, string>>). (but go for option 1.) –  Anthony Pegram Oct 14 '10 at 17:29
    
Option 3 say that I miss Dinamic runtime binder. What is that? Should I import something? –  Lorenzo Oct 14 '10 at 17:32
3  
+1 Option 1 is really the best to reuse the type in different methods. –  Jordão Oct 14 '10 at 17:43
    
Option 3 is unnecessary, really, when you can just use a custom class that is non-anonymous (nonymous?). It adds unnecessary overhead and doesn't buy you anything except fewer keystrokes. –  siride Oct 16 '10 at 22:41
    
@Greg: does Option 3 works even if the returned List<object> is inside a satellite DLL? –  Lorenzo Oct 18 '10 at 15:44
foreach ( var o in list ) {
    Console.WriteLine( o.ContactID );
}

this will work only if list is IEnumerable<anonymous type>, like this:

var list = allContacts.Select(c => new {
        ContactID = c.ContactID,
        FullName = c.FullName
    });
}

but you can't return anonymous types, because you must define return type (you can't return var) and anonymous types can't have names. you should create non-anonymous type if you with to pass it. Actually anonymous types should not be used too much, except for inside of queries.

share|improve this answer
1  
You can't return IEnumerable<anonymous type> –  Greg Oct 14 '10 at 17:23
    
The return give me a warning that cannot do an implicit conversione between IEnumerable<Anonymous Type #1> and List<object>. How do I have to change my method signature? –  Lorenzo Oct 14 '10 at 17:24
1  
@Lorenzo as it was mentioned, you can't return anonymous types, because you must define return type and anonymous types can't have names. you should create non-anonymous type if you with to pass it. Actually anonymous types should not be used too much, except for inside of queries. –  Andrey Oct 14 '10 at 17:41
    
@Greg i fixed answer –  Andrey Oct 14 '10 at 17:44
    
thnaks for helping. Sorry for ignorance but was my first time using Anonymous types. These answers have been very useful to me! –  Lorenzo Oct 14 '10 at 17:56

If you have a method like this:

  List<object> GetContactInfo() {
    List<object> list = new List<object>();
    foreach ( Contact c in allContacts ) { 
        list.Add( new { 
            ContactID = c.ContactID, 
            FullName = c.FullName 
        }); 
    } 
    return list;
  }

You shouldn't really do this, but there's a very ugly and not future-proof technique that you can use:

  static T CastByExample<T>(object target, T example) {
    return (T)target;
  } 

  // .....

  var example = new { ContactID = 0, FullName = "" };
  foreach (var o in GetContactInfo()) {
    var c = CastByExample(o, example);
    Console.WriteLine(c.ContactID);
  }

It relies on the fact (which can change!) that the compiler reuses anonymous types for types that have the same "shape" (properties names and types). Since your "example" matches the "shape" of the type in the method, the same type is reused.

Dynamic variables in C# 4 are the best way to solve this though.

share|improve this answer
7  
This is grotesque, yet fascinating. –  Greg Oct 14 '10 at 17:42

You cannot do this with anonymous types. Just create a Contact class/struct and use that.

List<object> list = new List<object>();
foreach ( Contact c in allContacts ) {
    list.Add( c );
}

Then you can do this:

foreach ( var o in list ) {
    Console.WriteLine( o.ContactID );
}

...or this:

foreach ( object o in list ) {
    Console.WriteLine( ((Contact)o).ContactID ); //Gives intellisense
}

Of course you should in that case just do create a Contact list instead of an object list:

List<Contact> list = new List<Contact>();
foreach ( Contact c in allContacts ) {
    list.Add( c );
}

EDIT: Missed essential part of the question. Now fixed.
EDIT: Changed answer yet again. See above.

share|improve this answer
    
o is not of type Contact, it's an anonymous type. –  Paul Ruane Oct 14 '10 at 17:19
    
this is wrong. o is not instance of Contact, but instance of anonymous type –  Andrey Oct 14 '10 at 17:19
    
Oh, missed that part. Read it too fast. The others are correct. Use 'var'. –  Mike Webb Oct 14 '10 at 17:21
2  
Won't work. list's type is List<object>. Thus var o is equivalent to Object o. Object does not have a property ContactID, therefore it would fail to compile. –  Greg Oct 14 '10 at 17:40
    
I guess I need to look more into anonymous types. Fixed yet again. –  Mike Webb Oct 15 '10 at 18:03

replacing object with var in for each construct may work

share|improve this answer
4  
List<var> is what you suggest? –  Andrey Oct 14 '10 at 17:20

I know I'm late to the party but I researching somthing else and found this article which answers your question.

It is possible to cast the list of objects back into the anonymous type.

    public static void Main()
    {
        foreach (object item in GetList())
        {
            var x = Cast(item, new { ContactID = 0, FullName = "" });
            Console.WriteLine(x.ContactID + " " + x.FullName);
        }

    }

    public static IEnumerable<object> GetList()
    {
        yield return new { ContactID = 4, FullName = "Jack Smith" };
        yield return new { ContactID = 5, FullName = "John Doe" };
    }

    public static T Cast<T>(object obj, T type)
    {
        return (T)obj;
    }
share|improve this answer

i would use

allContacts
 .Select(c => new { c.ContactID, c.FullName })
 .ToList()
 .ForEach(c => {
   ...do stuff;
 });

then you dont need to declare at all. i believe that less declaration, less semi-colon leads to less bug

share|improve this answer
1  
I think you've missed the real question. Please read it again carefully –  Lorenzo Oct 16 '10 at 20:41

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.