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I tried the search function but only found questions regarding reading in comma/space delimited files.

My question is however, how do you usually approach this. Say I have a list/array/... of values, like {1, 2, 3, 4} and want to print them with a delimiter.

The simplest version would be something like:

#include <stdio.h>

int main(void)
{
     char list[] = {1, 2, 3, 4};
     unsigned int i;

     for (i = 0; i < 4; ++i)
     printf("%d, ", list[i]);

     return 0;
}

which will obviously print "1, 2, 3, 4, ". The problem I have with that is the comma and space character at the end.

Now I could do:

#include <stdio.h>

int main(void)
{
    char list[] = {1, 2, 3, 4};
    unsigned int i;

    for (i = 0; i < 4; ++i)
    {
        printf("%d", list[i]);
        if (i < 3)
            printf(", ");
    }

    return 0;
}

Bút that doesn't seem like the best way to do it. Can somebody point me into the right direction? Thanks

PS: No, I don't usually hardcode values
PPS: No, I am not trying to write .csv files ;)

share|improve this question
    
possible duplicate of Printing lists with commas C++ –  Jonathan Leffler Oct 17 '13 at 3:54

7 Answers 7

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I use this idiom:

assert(n > 0);
printf("%d", list[0]);
for (i = 1; i < n; ++i)
     printf(", %d", list[i]);

Its one disadvantage is that it doesn't scale nicely for n == 0, like a simple loop. Alternatively, you can add protection against n == 0:

if (n > 0)
    printf("%d", list[0]);
for (i = 1; i < n; ++i)
     printf(", %d", list[i]);
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, this looks very nice and tidy. –  melzer Oct 14 '10 at 19:23
    
Another disadvantage is that you have to duplicate the body of the loop. –  jamesdlin Oct 14 '10 at 19:58
    
The assert(n > 0); does not look right, that's not a necessary condition to print contents of an array. –  Arun Oct 14 '10 at 20:20
    
For this code it is. Underneath is the other version. –  Michał Trybus Oct 14 '10 at 20:34
    
You could quite reasonably replace the assert() by if (n > 0) { followed by the other code and }. –  Jonathan Leffler Oct 15 '10 at 3:35

My standard technique for this is:

const char *pad = "";
for (int i = 0; i < n; i++)
{
    printf("%s%d", pad, list[i]);
    pad = ", ";
}

Sometimes, the initial value of pad is a blank, or a colon blank, or whatever else works in context.

share|improve this answer
    
Pretty unusual, I like it. +1 –  Michał Trybus Oct 14 '10 at 18:51
    
Unusual indeed, but a very nice idea. But I think I will stick with Michal Trybus version. –  melzer Oct 14 '10 at 19:24

I picked up this format with the conditional operator from K&R2:

for (i = 0; i < n; i++)
    printf("%d%s", list[i], i+1 < n ? ", " : "\n");
share|improve this answer
    
K&R2? Referring to the second edition? –  melzer Oct 15 '10 at 9:22
    
@melzer: Yes, the second edition of "The C Programming Language" with the "ANSI C" stamp on the front. I just looked it up: it is used in section 5.10. –  schot Oct 15 '10 at 9:28

Well even thought there is already an accepted answer, nobody has come with the obvious one to my taste:

#include <stdio.h>
int main(void) {
    unsigned list[] = {1, 2, 3, 4};
    unsigned const n = 4;
    if (n) for (unsigned i = 0; ; ++i) {
        printf("%d", list[i]);
        if (i >= n) break;
        printf(", ");
    }
    printf("\n");
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
That's pretty much the same as what the OP mentioned. –  jamesdlin Oct 14 '10 at 23:28
    
@jamesdlin: I don't know how you measure "pretty much", but the idea is to do just the number of comparisons that are needed, without redundancy. On the other hand it avoids the duplication of the number printing code as in Michał Trybus' solution. –  Jens Gustedt Oct 15 '10 at 6:02
    
Oh, good point. I missed that aspect. You do have to add an extra check if the list might be empty, though. –  jamesdlin Oct 15 '10 at 8:27
    
@jamesdlin: yes, good point, too. I'll add that. –  Jens Gustedt Oct 15 '10 at 8:52

Use Michal Trybus's version or the reverse

for (i = 0; i < (n - 1); ++i) 
{
     printf("%d, ", list[i]);
}
printf("%d", list[n - 1]);
share|improve this answer
    
@Michal, Nice catch. thank you very much. –  Himanshu Oct 14 '10 at 18:27
    
No problem. I've removed this comment already;) –  Michał Trybus Oct 14 '10 at 18:50
for ( printf("%d",list[i=0]) ; i < n ; printf(", %d", list[++i]) ) ;
share|improve this answer
    
I wanted to upvote, because this reminds me of my C lecturer. She loved code nobody can understand. Unfortunately, off-by-one;( –  Michał Trybus Oct 14 '10 at 19:22

Why not just another version while we're at it. Here's what I normally do

for (i=0;i<n;++i)
{
  if (i) printf(", ");
  printf("%d",list[i]);
}
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