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Python: Behaviour of increment and decrement operators

Hi, I've tried this.

++num

and the num doesn't change at all, always show the value when initialized

if I change ++num to num+=1 then it works.

So, my question is how that ++ operator works?

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marked as duplicate by bernie, BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft, Aamir, nmichaels, Wooble Oct 14 '10 at 19:32

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

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I don't see a need to downvote this question. It's a duplicate and the appropriate action is closing not downvoting. –  Davy8 Oct 14 '10 at 19:48
    
Doesn't work? What makes you even think it exists? What tutorial are you reading? Where did you see it? –  S.Lott Oct 14 '10 at 20:30
    
@S.Lott: You could just start stabbing away at Python and think it's there because several other languages do. If you just write some function and try to use ++x as an increment, it won't throw any errors, just be silently broken. –  Nick T Oct 14 '10 at 20:53
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@Nick T: "stabbing away at Python" and "think" don't belong in the same sentence. It makes for a very, very bad question. And it says bad things about anyone who tries to learn a language by "stabbing away". Indeed, it causes me deep grief to think that folks actually do such things. Reading has every advantage. And it's faster than stabbing away. And there's less opportunity for this kind of toweringly bad assumption. –  S.Lott Oct 14 '10 at 20:59

2 Answers 2

up vote 20 down vote accepted

There isn't a ++ operator in python. You're applying unary + twice to the variable.

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Answer: there is no ++ operator in Python. += 1 is the correct way to increment a number, but note that since integers and floats are immutable in Python,

>>> a = 2
>>> b = a
>>> a += 2
>>> b
2
>>> a
4

This behavior is different from that of a mutable object, where b would also be changed after the operation:

>>> a = [1]
>>> b = a
>>> a += [2]
>>> b
[1, 2]
>>> a
[1, 2]
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I don't see how the += behavior you showed is different from any other language with a += operator that translates x += c to x = x + c Even if the type was mutable, += always creates a new instance instead of mutating. –  Davy8 Oct 14 '10 at 19:17
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+1 for more informative than the guy with the faster trigger-finger –  BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft Oct 14 '10 at 19:20
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@Davy8: += does not make a new object if it's mutable -- only when it isn't. –  Daenyth Oct 14 '10 at 19:21
    
Interesting... so in Python x += y does not translate to x = x + y. That seems counterintuitive to me, but I haven't been bitten by it yet. –  Davy8 Oct 14 '10 at 19:25
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Actually, x += y can translate into x = x + y if x is an object with __add__ overloaded but not __iadd__. –  Mike DeSimone Oct 14 '10 at 19:34

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