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Again, I really hope this isn't a matter of opinion; I'm trying to know which is the best way to determine the type of an object that belongs to a certain hierarchy in C#. I have two ways to design my application:

1 - Use a property on the base class:

public abstract class Parent 
{
    public abstract TypeOfObject TypeOfObject { get; }
}

public class Child1 : Parent
{
    public override TypeOfObject TypeOfObject { get { return TypeOfObject.Child1 } }

    // ...
}

public class Child2 : Parent
{
    public override TypeOfObject TypeOfObject { get { return TypeOfObject.Child2 } }

    // ...
}

public enum TypeOfObject 
{
    Child1,
    Child2
}

public static void Main()
{
    Parent p = new Child1();

    switch (p.TypeOfObject)
    {
        case TypeOfObject.Child1: _doSomethingWithChild1(p);break;
        case TypeOfObject.Child2: _doSomethingWithChild2(p);break;
    }
}

2 - Use the is operator

public abstract class Parent 
{
    // ...
}

public class Child1 
{
    // ...
}


public class Child2 : Parent
{    
    // ...
}

public enum TypeOfObject 
{
    Child1,
    Child2
}

public static void Main()
{
    Parent p = new Child1();

    if (p is Child1) _doSomethingWithChild1(p);
    if (p is Child2) _doSomethingWithChild2(p);
}

What are the implications of each alternative? I think 2 has a greater performance hit since it relies on metadata, but 1 seems way less elegant. Besides, I learned to do this the 1 way in C++... I'm not sure it's necessary to do so with C#.

EDIT 1:

I've added the override keyword to the code above.

EDIT 2:

I'm sorry, I've probably not made myself clear. I will illustrate it better:

For example, I have a WPF Panel object that has a Children property, which returns me UIElements. I need to know what type a certain element is to act upon it... in my particular case, the user is drawing a graph on the screen, so I need to know how many nodes and how many connections are drawn in order to store then at the database. I can't, unfortunately, use polymorphism for that, right? How will I know if I should add a line to my nodes table or to my connections table?

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10  
This is a common OO design mistake. You don't need this. Please read up on "polymorphism" and then close the question. –  S.Lott Oct 14 '10 at 19:51
    
There are many examples of the first way in the .NET Framework, e.g., XmlDocument/XmlElement/..., XDocument/XElement/..., LambdaExpression/UnaryExpression/... –  dtb Oct 14 '10 at 20:02
    
@S.Lott: +1 :) (blah) –  leppie Oct 15 '10 at 13:37
    
@S.Lott: I'm sorry about the example I made. I'm pretty sure the edit is clearer. –  Bruno Brant Oct 16 '10 at 14:16
    
"I can't, unfortunately, use polymorphism for that, right?" Wrong. "How will I know if I should add a line to my nodes table or to my connections table?" A simple "addToTable" method is all it takes. Nodes implement one add, connections implement another. –  S.Lott Oct 18 '10 at 11:07

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Your use examples are wrong (as other have said - use polymorphism) but it can be reasonable to ask what type an object is.

I asked a similar question for c++ http://stackoverflow.com/questions/3336859/testing-a-c-class-for-features

Regarding the difference between #1 and #2. Both require metadata. In case 1 you are making it, in case 2 you are using metadata made by the CLR anyway. The CLR is probably better at it than you , and its paying that overhead anyway

As always - if you want to know which is faster the answers is simple - measure it and see. I doubt there is a measurable difference

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"it can be reasonable to ask what type an object is." Please provide an example of when it's actually "reasonable" that doesn't involve Pretty Poor Polymorphism. Sadly, all the examples of run-time type identification I've ever seen are all bad polymorphism mistakes. Please clarify with an example. –  S.Lott Oct 15 '10 at 11:14
    
    
@pm100: How is that not yet another example of bad polymorphism? It looks like something that should have been simple polymorphism. What did I miss? –  S.Lott Oct 15 '10 at 18:38
    
how do i tell the user that the currently selected object does not support a given method if I cant ask it what interfaces it supports. I am not doing polymorhpism - i am doing mixins –  pm100 Oct 15 '10 at 21:22
    
@S.Lott: although it's not my intention to turn this into a discussion, I'd ask you to look at my example. I have UI objects which are to be added to the database. They shouldn't know about the database itself. Is there a better way to convert then to database objects than having the component that does communicates to the DB ask them their type? –  Bruno Brant Oct 17 '10 at 3:56

You are doing it wrong™. Ever heard of polymorphism (late/dynamic binding to be more precise)? The parent should should have an abstract method like doSomething() to be implemented by the children, whatever was in _doSomethingWithChild1 should be in Child1.doSomething, etc. This is what OO is all - well, not all, but to a large part - about! The C++ FAQ is right claiming that C++ wouldn't be object oriented without virtual. Not only it's easier/less error-prone to add another child (you just define a new subclass and the method, no need to fiddle with switches or ifs) and very likely the fastest way possible (every JIT worth its salt uses polymorphic inline caching), it's also idiomatic and less likely to get you that "WTF" stare ;)

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This is effectively the same thing as a switch statement. If you're "switching" on the runtime type, I agree, You're Doing It Wrong(TM). Look around for refactoring switch statements to polymorphism. –  FMM Oct 14 '10 at 21:26
    
I've edited the question in order to produce a clearer example. The objects may be polymorphic, but there will be times when I need to know the exact type of them. –  Bruno Brant Oct 16 '10 at 14:20
    
@Bruno: How exactly does the example not work with polymorphism? If you would otherwise insert things into a database depending on the type, just make the objects (polymorphically) put this information into the db? –  delnan Oct 16 '10 at 15:49
    
Simply because then I would hurt another principle of my application design, separation of concerns. UI objects should know nothing about my database. –  Bruno Brant Oct 17 '10 at 3:48
    
@Bruno: "All problems in computer science can be solved by another level of indirection (except for the problem of too many layers of indirection)" ^^ E.g. you could add yet another layer where each object goes with one of those UI objects, and their concern is to fill the database etc. Although this gets ridiculous after a few times, i.e. in your case I would propably re-label the "Use polymorphism!" advice as "really consider this" (where it usually is "you must do this in 95% of the cases"). –  delnan Oct 17 '10 at 9:26

the first alternative is not neccessary. if you look at Object (the base for ALL objects in C#) you will find a GetType() member.

In our production code, we frequently use method 2, mainly for "down-casting" that is, casting my a base class to a class that is derived from said base class...

if ( myObject is Type1 ) dosomething();
if ( myObject is Type2 ) dosomethingelse();

we also use the as operator....

Type1 object1 = someotherobject as type1;
if ( object1 != null ) dosomething();

the nice thing about this, is that you won't get exceptions like you would if you tried something like this:

((TypeFoo)object1).bar(); // if object 1 is NOT of TypeFoo you get an exception
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Did you mean GetType instead of TypeOf? –  Gabe Oct 14 '10 at 19:55
1  
Polymorphism should make something different occur based on whether myObject is of type Type1 versus Type2 without having to explicitly check. If you're operating on myObject and needing to distinguish its concrete type, that means you're inappropriately coupled to it and need to refactor. –  FMM Oct 14 '10 at 21:16
    
by all means, you should use polymorphism if you can, however, sometime you don't have that option. for example, LINQ gives me an IEnumerable, but if that is really a List of something, how can i know that if i don't test it? –  Muad'Dib Oct 14 '10 at 21:40

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