Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am wanting my TCP server and client to "talk" to each other depending on what the other says. But when I run, it seems to go through one iteration, but then both the server and client seem to just "hang" there. Once I kill it on the client side, I end up getting a broken pipe error.

Can anyone interpret what I am doing wrong here?

SERVER code snippet:

while(feof(file_ptr) == 0)
{
    fscanf(file_ptr, "%s", supplies);
    printf("%s\n", supplies);

    //SEND supplies to all clients (currently just one client)

    n = write(newsockfd, supplies, strlen(supplies));

    if (n < 0)
    {
        error("ERROR writing to socket");
    }


    //Receive a request from client that they can use supply

    bzero(buffer,2);
    n = read(newsockfd,buffer,2);

    if (n < 0)
    {
        error("ERROR reading from socket");
    }

    printf("Who is using supply? %s\n", buffer);


    if(strcmp(buffer, "A"))
    {
        aRounds++;  
    }


    while(done != 1)
    {
        //WAIT loop until message CO is received from client
        bzero(buffer,2);
        n = read(newsockfd,buffer,2);

        if (n < 0)
        {
            error("ERROR reading from socket");
        }

        printf("Done? %s\n", buffer);



        if(strcmp(buffer, "CO"))
        {
            done = 1;
        }
    }

    done = 0;
}

fclose(file_ptr);
n = write(newsockfd, "DN", 2);

CLIENT code snippet:

while(noSupplies != 1)
{
    //RECEIVE MSG from server about supplies
    bzero(buffer,2); 
    n = read(sockfd,buffer,2);

    if (n < 0) 
    {
        error("ERROR reading from socket");
    }

    printf("%s\n",buffer);

    if(strcmp(buffer, "BC") == 0 || strcmp(buffer, "CB") == 0)
    {
        //SEND server msg that you are using supply

        n = write(sockfd,"A", 1);
        if (n < 0)
        {
            error("ERROR writing to socket"); 
        }


        printf("Client A has received components %s during round %d.\n", buffer, round);


        n = write(sockfd,"CO", 2);
        if (n < 0)
        {
            error("ERROR writing to socket"); 
        }

    }
    else if(strcmp(buffer, "DN"))
    {
        noSupplies = 1;
    }

    round++;
}

I get the following from the server (before killing):

BC
Who is smoking? A
Done smoking? CO

And the following from the client (before killing):

BC
Client A has received components BC during round 1.

Then after killing from the client.. I get the following from the server:

BC
Who is using supply? A
Done? CO
Done? 
CB
Who is using supply? 
Done? 
CB
Who is using supply? 
Done? 
BC
Broken pipe

Does anyone understand what I am doing wrong? (looking for code fix!)

Just an FYI.. I will be changing the server code eventually to handle listening to mulitple clients (TCP) but one hurdle at a time right? :S

Thanks!

share|improve this question
add comment

2 Answers

Not sure if this is all of your problem, but

bzero(buffer, 2);
n = read(socket, buffer, 2);

...

printf("%s", buffer);

is not correct, since if the read actually did get 2 bytes and neither of them were 0 then buffer may not be a null terminated string (unless there is something earlier that made that so).

Several calls to strcmp should also always fail for the same reason -- the read in string is not 0 terminated so strcmp thinks that it keeps on going and therefore is not the same as the compared to string, even if the first letters are the same.

edit

 n = read(socket, buffer, 2);
 if (n<0) {
     die_horrible_death();
 }
 buffer[n] = 0; // since arrays are 0 indexed this should be after last read character
 printf("I just read: \"%s\"\n", buffer);
share|improve this answer
    
so you are saying that buffer needs to be a null terminating string? –  developer Oct 14 '10 at 20:38
    
If you want to treat it like a C string, the way that printf and strcmp do then yes, you need to make sure that the character after the last character that you have read in is set to 0. I am not sure if this will fix your problem because I don't really have much of an idea what it is supposed to do. –  nategoose Oct 14 '10 at 20:47
    
Ok so I changed all cases where I was writing to have \n at the end and increased the size sent by one. and increased all the read sizes by 1. e.g. n = write(sockfd,"CO\n", 3); and bzero(buffer, 3); n = read(socket, buffer, 3); Changing this seemed to fix my problem!! :) Were all the changes necessary or just on the reads? –  developer Oct 14 '10 at 20:49
    
'\n' is a newline, not a 0. See example in edit. –  nategoose Oct 14 '10 at 21:00
    
hmm.. adding buffer[n] = 0; does not help at all, but once I changed everything to send a new line after the string it stopped "hanging" and completed the program as expected... –  developer Oct 14 '10 at 21:18
show 1 more comment

Your server code writes only once something to the client, at the beginning. Later, in the loop - it just reads.

OTOH your client reads and writes in the loop.

Since you're working with sockets in a blocking mode - this means that your client eventually will become blocked in a call to recv.

P.S. No offenses - but you have a lot to learn.

  1. TCP is a tunnel. When your server sends 2 bytes of data in a single call to send/write - there's no guarantee your client will read this within a single call to recv.
  2. Hence - reading and parsing always must be done in a sort of a loop.
  3. You can't write a really robust client/server with ability to timeout/interrupt on demand using only blocking I/O.
  4. Learn, learn, learn
share|improve this answer
    
thanks for your comments! I am learning! hence why this is a practice program! I actually fixed it by putting /n characters whenever I write something :D –  developer Oct 14 '10 at 21:24
    
oh and yes, it is only supposed to write once at the beginning and just listen for two responses in order to continue :) –  developer Oct 14 '10 at 21:25
    
Well, I meant that when you're using blocking I/O - you actually loose the control over the program flow. You become dependent on the peer. Unless it sends anything to you - you're blocked. Hence - it's better to use sockets asynchronously –  valdo Oct 14 '10 at 21:28
    
I see.. well it will always send something because of the contents in the textfile. And once I add new clients and a different textfile, there will always be someone who will reply.. so for my next example I will take your advice and try it asynchronously :) –  developer Oct 14 '10 at 21:42
    
Yes, it is possible to write a robust client/server with ability to interrupt and timeout, using blocking I/O. Just use select(). –  Alek Oct 14 '10 at 22:22
show 1 more comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.