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Here is what my code look like

CCSprite *sp = [CCSprite spriteWithFile:@"textureWithOneColorbackground.jpg"];

[self addChild:sp];

// Change the blending factors
[sp setBlendFunc:(ccBlendFunc){GL_ONE, GL_ONE}];
[sp setColor:ccBLACK];

The original texture color is (246,149,32) The outcome now is (0, 0, 0)

According to OpenGL, the calculation should be like this: ((246 * 1 + 0 * 1), (149 * 1 + 0 * 1), (32 * 1 + 0 * 1)) So it should be the same.

Don't know why I am doing wrong here, can someone help me out?

Regards,

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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted
[sp setBlendFunc:(ccBlendFunc){GL_ONE, GL_ONE}];

setBlendFunc sets glBlendFunc. source blending factor and destination blending factor.

[sp setColor:ccBLACK];

setColor doesn't mean it is for destination blending color. It means to set color for vertex color.

You set black (R=0,G=0,B=0,A=1) for vertex color and if background color is black,

(([texture color]246 * [vertex color](0 / 255) * [GL_ONE]1 + [background color]0 * [GL_ONE]1), (149 * (0 / 255) * 1 + 0 * 1), (32 * (0 / 255) * 1 + 0 * 1)) = (0, 0, 0)

iPhone 3D Programming is a nice book for understanding OpenGL ES on iPhone.

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@peter Great, finally I understood how the algorithm works –  Leo Mar 2 '11 at 6:01
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According to the docs:

http://www.cocos2d-iphone.org/api-ref/0.99.0/interface_c_c_sprite.html#af0c786f0f5b4081a4524e78eda9c8734

The Blending function property belongs to CCSpriteSheet, so you can't individually set the blending function property.

You seem to be applying it to the sprite and not the sheet. Try applying the blend to the sheet.

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The sprite image is loading from file, as you can see from my code, so it means it is not using spritesheet. If you look further down, the doc says "If the parent is an standard CCNode, then CCSprite behaves like any other CCNode: It supports blending functions It supports aliasing / antialiasing But the rendering will be slower" Also, spritesheet blending means one blending will affect the whole sheet, because it has only one texture. The blending will still work, just to the whole sheet, instead of individual sprites. –  Leo Oct 15 '10 at 8:05
    
(I should learn to read.) There's a method -(void)useSelfRender. After creating the sprite you might need to call this first on it. –  No one in particular Oct 15 '10 at 9:51
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