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I currently have the following

        if (!RunCommand(LogonAsAServiceCommand))
            return;

        if (!ServicesRunningOrStart())
            return;

        if (!ServicesStoppedOrHalt())
            return;

        if (!BashCommand(CreateRuntimeBashCommand))
            return;

        if (!ServicesStoppedOrHalt())
            return;

        if (!BashCommand(BootstrapDataBashCommand))
            return;

        if (!ServicesRunningOrStart())
            return;

would it be cleaner to do this? is it safe?

        if (
           (RunCommand(LogonAsAServiceCommand))
        && (ServicesRunningOrStart())
        && (ServicesStoppedOrHalt())
        && (BashCommand(CreateRuntimeBashCommand))
        && (ServicesStoppedOrHalt())
        && (BashCommand(BootstrapDataBashCommand))
        && (ServicesRunningOrStart())
        )
        {
               // code after "return statements" here
        }
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5  
Totally the same and a matter of style except that the first one is easier to debug (and set breakpoints). –  Kirk Woll Oct 15 '10 at 13:25
    
I agree with @Kirk Woll, when optimized they should be the same thing if the compiler/jitter is clever enough. –  leppie Oct 15 '10 at 13:27

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You should stick to whatever is more readable, and understandable.

Unless it is real inefficient.

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+1 This joins the "keep it simple" expression! =) –  Will Marcouiller Oct 15 '10 at 13:57

When I look at the first approach, my first thought is that the reason the code has been written in that way is that the operations involved probably have side-effects. From the names of the methods, I assume they do? If so, I would definitely go with the first approach and not the second; I think readers of your code would find it very confusing to see a short-circuiting && expression being used to conditionally execute side-effects.

If there are no side-effects, either will do; they are both perfectly readable. If you find that there are several more conditions or the conditions themselves vary in different scenarios, you could try something like:

Func<bool>[] conditions = ...
if(conditions.Any(condn => condn()))
{
   ...
}

I wouldn't really go with such an approach in your case, however.

share|improve this answer
    
what do you mean by "side-effects"? –  Nico Oct 15 '10 at 13:48
    
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Side_effect_(computer_science). Effectively, what I mean in this case is that the choice of short-circuiting vs. not short-circuiting introduces an observable, functional difference in the state of the program. –  Ani Oct 15 '10 at 13:49
2  
+1 For providing a good rule for deciding between which statement will be more readable. Eric Lippert has a post on SO somewhere discussing this rule in the context of the ternary operator, but I can't seem to find it. –  Brian Oct 15 '10 at 13:59
    
Eric Lippert's discussion, which is actually only peripherally relevant: stackoverflow.com/questions/3909849/… –  Brian Oct 15 '10 at 15:40

Is the first code a set of OR statements?

if ( 
       (!RunCommand(LogonAsAServiceCommand)) 
    || (!ServicesRunningOrStart()) 
    || (!ServicesStoppedOrHalt()) 
    || (!BashCommand(CreateRuntimeBashCommand)) 
    || (!ServicesStoppedOrHalt()) 
    || (!BashCommand(BootstrapDataBashCommand)) 
    || (!ServicesRunningOrStart()) 
share|improve this answer
1  
If you do it as OR statements, you get the efficiency of returning as soon as any of the conditions are true, rather than waiting to see if they all are. –  Mark Dickinson Oct 15 '10 at 13:27
6  
Both && and || are short-circuiting, so there's no real advantage to doing this. –  Ani Oct 15 '10 at 13:30
    
+1 for performance and for correcting the OP's second solution. –  BrunoLM Oct 15 '10 at 13:37
3  
@BrunoLM: This is the same as the OP's second solution. The only difference is that the contents of the if and else blocks are reversed (think De Morgan's law). –  Brian Oct 15 '10 at 13:38
1  
@BrunoLM - It is the same. The OP is using &&, but not inverting the output. Mark has simply flipped that using || and inverting the output of each function. See Brian's comment above. –  SwDevMan81 Oct 15 '10 at 13:47

Either is fine. However from a style perspective I'd suggest that since this is a series of comands you could use a List<Action> to hold these and make the function data driven.

(new Action[] {  func1, func2, .... }).ToList().ForEach(a => a());

Of course since the functions have differing signatures you may have to do multiple ones...

again it's a style matter....

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1  
This is a nice approach, but still not very debug friendly. Especially when you are filling the list with lambda's all over the place. Normal methods should be ok though. –  leppie Oct 15 '10 at 13:34
    
agreed on the debug comment. I'm very data driven in my code but it makes it more unit test friendly. Also I tend to use logging more that debugging for analysis these days –  Preet Sangha Oct 15 '10 at 13:37
    
This sort of stuff debugs much better in vs2010 :) –  Mark Dickinson Oct 15 '10 at 14:08

If you're using this code multiple times I would suggest you put it in a separate method such as:

public static class HelperClass
{
  public static bool ServicesRunning()
  {
    // Your code here... 
  }
}

and calling it when needed

public class SomeClass
{
  // Constructors etc...
  public void SomeMethod()
  {
     if(HelperClass.ServicesRunning())
     {
        // Your code here...
     }
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
huh, I'm clearly already doing that? –  Nico Oct 15 '10 at 15:35
    
Well it wasn't exactly crystal clear that it was your design. But if that's what you're already doing I can only say I agree with that design. Using long && / || if-statements easily gets messy (in my opinion). –  Mantisen Oct 17 '10 at 14:44

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