Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

We use the http://jedi.codehaus.org libraries for working with collections and manipulating them in a functional way. We recently came across a problem when doing something similar to the following:

public class Address {
    //constructors and stuff

    public KiloWatts electricityConsumed(Duration timePeriod) throw NoElectricitySupply {
        .... does stuff but can throw checked exception
    } 
}

given we have a collection of addresses and we wanted to perform something on the UnitsOfElectricity associated with each address, how would you handle the thrown exception e.g.:

public KiloWatts totalEnergyConsumed(Address... addresses, final Duration timePeriod) {
     List<KiloWatts> energyConsumedPerAddress = FunctionalPrimitives.collect(addresses, new Functor<Address, KiloWatts>{
         public KiloWatts execute(Address address){
              try {
                  return address.energyConsumed(timePeriod);
              } catch (NoElectricitySupply e) {

                  //What do you do here?

              }
         }
     });
}

How would you handle the exception?

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

why not return an Option<Kilowatts> from the functor so you can return None for the exceptional case? You can then flatten the List<Option<Kilowatts>> to List<Kilowatts> (there is a method on FunctionalPrimitives for that).

Alternatively, if you have control over the energyConsumed method which throws the Exception, replace the thrown Exception with are return type of Either<String, Kilowatts> (the String can contain an error message or something - I would need to see more to understand what to do there).

Using Either instead of exceptions enables composition, exceptions break composition completely.

share|improve this answer
    
By the way, the use of Either and composeable error handling ultimately leads you to doing it in grown-up languages with applicative functors: applicative-errors-scala.googlecode.com/svn/artifacts/0.6/pdf/… and soi.city.ac.uk/~ross/papers/Applicative.html –  Channing Walton Mar 26 '11 at 21:40

As far as I can tell, you have 2 options:

  1. throw a runtime exception (and ignore it); or
  2. throw a runtime exception, using it to 'marshall' the checked exception past the interface boundary.

for (2), something like:

public KiloWatts totalEnergyConsumed(Address... addresses, final Duration timePeriod) {
    try {
        List<KiloWatts> energyConsumedPerAddress = FunctionalPrimitives.collect(addresses, new Functor<Address, KiloWatts>{
            public KiloWatts execute(Address address){
                try {
                    return address.energyConsumed(timePeriod);
                } catch (NoElectricitySupply e) {
                    throw new RuntimeException("internal marshalling exception", e);
                }
           }
       });
    } catch(RuntimeException re) {
        throw e.getCause();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
This would work - it's a shame java forces you to do this. I wonder if anyone has come up with a neat clean way of doing this? –  Stuart Ervine Oct 15 '10 at 14:16
    
Yeah, Java can be noisy. Try Scala :) –  Raymond Barlow Oct 15 '10 at 14:17

If NoElectricitySupply is logically equivalent to zero KiloWatts, shouldn't you just return such object?

If they're not quite equivalent, you could create some sort of special NoKiloWatts subclass and return an instance of such in the catch block.

share|improve this answer
1  
I agree. I would liken this to the concept of "not a number" (NaN) that you can encounter when you perform certain math operations. –  John Munsch Oct 15 '10 at 14:05
    
Nope - No electricity supply could mean they're not connected, perhaps they use gas or something instead. So zero kilowatts wouldn't necessarily model the situation correctly. –  Stuart Ervine Oct 15 '10 at 14:15

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.