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Need help finding or having a RegEx match a MM/YY or MM/YYYY format. My RegExFu is weak and I'm not even sure where to begin writing this.

Months should be 1-12, years, well anything beyond 2009 should be valid. Sorry for not mentioning more details before. This is used as an expiration date.

I'll add a bounty for whomever goes above and beyond and validates MM/YY or MM/YYYY format that is >= today's date. No sense letting expired stuff past the first validation layer.


I feel bad since I changed my requirements and had to be more specific in what I needed mid-question so I'll award bounties to all those who answered once the no-bounty window expires.

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You will like regular-expressions.info for a tutorial and weitz.de/regex-coach for trying them out. (\d\d)/(\d\d) is a start for mm/yy. Sry, I'm currently too lazy for the rest. –  gimpf Oct 15 '10 at 17:11
    
If you are planning to allow users to input 2 digit years, I don't recommend that. Prefer 4 digits (full digits) always. –  BrunoLM Oct 15 '10 at 17:27
    
@BrunoLM, well the API I'm working with accepts MM/YY format so any little perk I can give to my users I'll take. –  jfar Oct 15 '10 at 17:30
    
So you want year >= 2010 valid? –  BrunoLM Oct 15 '10 at 17:43
    
How will you use it? Where will you validate? Have you considered a calendar control, with minimal date? –  Kobi Oct 15 '10 at 18:01

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

What about

^(1[0-2]|0[1-9]|\d)\/(20\d{2}|19\d{2}|0(?!0)\d|[1-9]\d)$

Matches months

// 10 to 12 | 01 to 09 | 1 to 9
(1[0-2]|0[1-9]|\d)

And years

// 2000 to 2099 | 1900 to 1999
// 01 to 09 | 10 to 99
(20\d{2}|19\d{2}|0(?!0)\d|[1-9]\d)

To match anything >= 2010

/^(1[0-2]|0[1-9]|\d)\/([2-9]\d[1-9]\d|[1-9]\d)$/;

Result:

12/2009 : false
1/2010  : true
12/2011 : true
12/9011 : true
12/07   : false
12/17   : true
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@Bruno, that's basically my answer. –  Brad Oct 15 '10 at 17:13
    
Is there a reason why you're excluding the year 00? It's probably not good practice to use since it's kind of confusing, but it seems like it's still perfectly valid. Or does C# not allow that for date formats? –  eldarerathis Oct 15 '10 at 17:22
    
@eldarerathis: The OP didn't say what ranges he is expecting. I decided to exclude 00 because it seems ambiguous to me. 00 is 1900 or 2000? Anyway, this is just one example. What I recommend is to use 4 digits always. –  BrunoLM Oct 15 '10 at 17:26
    
Doesn't match 1/81. –  jfar Oct 15 '10 at 17:26
2  
You're awesome BrunoLM. –  jfar Oct 15 '10 at 17:36

Try:

var re = new Regex(@"(?<month>\d{2})/(?<year>\d{2}|\d{4})");
var month = re.Match(yourString).Groups["month"];
...

An alternative is:

if(dateStr.Length == 5)
    myDateTime = DateTime.ParseExact("MM/YY", dateStr);
else
    myDateTime = DateTime.ParseExact("MM/YYYY", dateStr);
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this allows month to be 54. –  Brad Oct 15 '10 at 17:13
    
Thanks for pointing out ParseExact. That makes my validation even better. –  jfar Oct 15 '10 at 17:37
    
ParseExact can take an array of formats, which is defiantly better than a regex. –  Kobi Oct 15 '10 at 17:47

Try this:

^(0[1-9]|1[0-2])/(19|2[0-1])\d{2}$

Constrains to actual months (1-12) and years 1900-2199.

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Hhm what about 10/100 :/? –  Lasse Espeholt Oct 15 '10 at 17:09
    
this matches "MM/YYY" aswell. –  Klaus Byskov Pedersen Oct 15 '10 at 17:10
    
@klausbyskov, I've updated it to be more precise. –  Brad Oct 15 '10 at 17:12
    
@Brad, this isn't matching 11/81 –  jfar Oct 15 '10 at 17:19
    
Matches 1212/1999 –  BrunoLM Oct 15 '10 at 17:19

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