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I am trying to perform a bitwise AND on a register, as a bitmask to remove the most significant bit (which happens to be bit 16 when counting from 0). However, when I try to compile my code using gcc, it gives me the following error messages:

Assembler messages: 19: Error: relocation overflow

My guess is that this has something to do with the size of the bit mask I am applying, because when I perform the AND with two registers containing small numbers I don't encounter the same error. The code itself looks like,

.global main
main:
save    %sp, -96, %sp

clr %l1
clr     %l2
set 0xffff, %l0
set 0xaaaa8c01, %l4
set 0xff001234, %l5
set 0x13579bdf, %l6
set 0xc8b4ae32, %l7
srl %l4, 31, %l1    
srl %l0, 15, %l2
xor %l1, %l2, %l1
and %l1, 0x1, %l1
sll %l0, 1, %l0
add %l0, %l1, %l0
and %l0, 0xffff, %l0


mov 1, %g1
ta  0

If anyone could offer some insight on how to solve this problem it would be very much appreciated.

Thanks,

badPanda

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The most significant bit is bit 15 (in a 16-bit integer, when bits are zero based).

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This is for a 32 bit integer. What I meant was that the bits from 17 onwards hold zeros (and should always hold zeros) in this particular problem. Perhaps MSB was not the correct terminology? –  badpanda Oct 15 '10 at 18:07
    
Do you mean 16-31 hold zeros? Which are the most significant 16 bits in a 32 bit integer. I am wondering if you are just experiencing register overflow due to one of those srl/sll instructions. –  Michael Goldshteyn Oct 15 '10 at 18:18
    
Yes, that was what I meant. Sorry for the confusion (I am just learning). All of the srl/sll instructions compile and work as intended when I run them, but the last line (add %l0, 0xffff, %l0) will not. –  badpanda Oct 15 '10 at 18:25
1  
@badpanda as I recall, the SPARC opcodes support immidiate values up to 10 or 12 bits. If you need more, use the load high instruction (can't recall the exact mnemonic). –  ruslik Oct 15 '10 at 20:19
    
Thanks ruslik, this ended up being the problem. –  badpanda Oct 18 '10 at 6:46

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