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Does Objective-C evaluate every statement on an if... else if... block or does it evaluate each as it comes to them and then skip the remaining evaluations if a true condition has been found?

This is more of a pragmatic question related to performance than anything else.

And yes I do know that the content of the if block itself isn't executed, but I am referring to the actual statements that get evaluated.

Example

if ([condition A] == test) {
  // Do something
} else if ([condition B] == test) {
  // Do something    
} else if ([condition C] == test) {
  // Do something    
} else {
  // Do something because all other tests failed
}    

So... if condition A is true, do conditions B and C get evaluated anyway?

If they do, then does using a switch statement perform the same way or does a switch only test each condition as it comes to it and then exits the evaluation because of the break?

My understanding is that on an if... else if... block, every condition is evaluated and therefore using a switch or nested if's (ugh - don't relish the thought there) might be faster on big evaluation operations on a lot of data (hundreds of thousands of items being checked against potentially a hundred statements).

Just curious :-)

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The better question is, "Does C ...?" as the basic flow control is inherited from C. Objective-C is a superset of C. –  Joshua Nozzi Oct 15 '10 at 19:02

3 Answers 3

up vote 11 down vote accepted

No, if condition A is met, B and C are not evaluated. Indeed, they are part of the else-clauses that won't get executed then anyway.

Just a side note: if (condA || condB) or if (condA && condB) also evaluates lazily, i.e. in the first case condB is only evaluated if condA is false, in the second case when condA is true.

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Eiko - the side note could actually come in handy and was for me the next natural extension to the question... Great to know. Thanks. –  Hooligancat Oct 15 '10 at 19:12
    
The computer sciency term is 'short-circuit evaluation'. See en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Short_circuit_evaluation –  Andrew Oct 15 '10 at 20:00
    
@Eiko, your Side Note is important for me. Do you have an apple developer link to show me where you get this info from apple ? I mean I have a long if statement and for speed reasons I want to be sure it will only check second if first is true and only third if first and second are true, and so on. And I would like to read more on how IF is treated in objective-C. Thx –  HpTerm Oct 25 '12 at 6:05
    
@HpTerm This is not specific to ObjC - it's a standard feature of C. Maybe start with the wikipedia link from Andrew. –  Eiko Oct 25 '12 at 9:54
    
@Eiko Ok thank you –  HpTerm Oct 25 '12 at 11:39

It only evaluates them as it comes to them. An if ... else if block is equivalent to if.. else {if...}. It behaves the same way as nested ifs, it's just formatted nicely and omits some braces.

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Thanks Josh. Good to know I had it wrong! :-) –  Hooligancat Oct 15 '10 at 19:11

Outside of the []'s objective-c behaves in exactly the same way that C does.

For if() ... else if() ... else ... chains that means each expression is evaluated until one evaluates to true and the block is entered. Basically

if (a) {
    ...
} else if (b) {
    ...
} else {
    ...
}

is interpreted as

if (a) {
    ...
} else {
    if (b) {
        ...
    } else {
        ...
    }
}
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Olliej - thanks for the feedback. This is all good news for my code :-) –  Hooligancat Oct 15 '10 at 19:12

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