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I have 4 .c files hello.c,here.c,bye.c and main.c. One header file mylib.h

The contents are as follows

hello.c

#include<stdio.h>

void hello()
{
    printf("Hello!\n");
}

here.c

#include<stdio.h>

void here()
{
     printf("I am here \n");
}

bye.c

#include<stdio.h>

void bye()
{
    printf("Bye,Bye");
}

main.c

#include<stdio.h>
#include "mylib.h"

int main()
{ 

  hello();
  here();
  bye();
  return 1;
}

mylib.h

#ifndef _mylib_
#define _mylib_

void hello();
void here();
void bye();

#endif

The makefile for creating a static lib is : Makefile

all:    myapp

#Macros

#Which Compiler
CC = g++

#Where to install
INSTDIR = /usr/local/bin

#Where are include files kept
INCLUDE = .

#Options for developement
CFLAGS = -g -Wall -ansi

#Options for release
#CFLAGS = -O -Wall -ansi

#Local Libraries
MYLIB = mylib.a

myapp:  main.o $(MYLIB)
    $(CC) -o myapp main.o $(MYLIB)

$(MYLIB):       $(MYLIB)(hello.o) $(MYLIB)(here.o) $(MYLIB)(bye.o)
main.o:         main.c mylib.h
hello.o:        hello.c
here.o:         here.c
bye.o:          bye.c

clean:
    -rm main.o hello.o here.o bye.o $(MYLIB)

install:        myapp
    @if [ -d $(INSTDIR) ]; \
    then \
            cp myapp $(INSTDIR);\
            chmod a+x $(INSTDIR)/myapp;\
            chmod og-w $(INSTDIR)/myapp;\
            echo "Installed in $(INSTDIR)";\
    else \
            echo "Sorry, $(INSTDIR) does not exist";\
    fi

Problem: When I execute the command

make -f Makefile all 

I get the following dependecy error:

make: Circular mylib.a <- mylib.a dependency dropped.
ar rv (hello.o) hello.o
/bin/sh: -c: line 0: syntax error near unexpected token `('
/bin/sh: -c: line 0: `ar rv (hello.o) hello.o'
make: *** [(hello.o)] Error 2

Questions : How do I resolve this? Which command is causing the cyclic dependency?

share|improve this question
    
By the way, using g++ is a compiler for a C program is an overkill. It will link your binary/library with standard C++ runtime (libstdc++), which you don't need in C. Replacing CC=g++ with CC=gcc should fix this. –  user405725 Oct 15 '10 at 20:08
    
Changed to gcc - problem persists –  Eternal Learner Oct 15 '10 at 20:26
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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted
#Local Libraries
MYLIB = mylib.a

myapp:  main.o $(MYLIB)
    $(CC) -o myapp main.o $(MYLIB)

$(MYLIB):       $(MYLIB)(hello.o) $(MYLIB)(here.o) $(MYLIB)(bye.o)

It looks like the last rule is

mylib.a: mylib.a (hello.o) mylib.a (here.o) mylib.a (bye.o)

Which is a circular dependency.

The line should be

mylib.a: hello.o here.o bye.o

Without the parentheses.

share|improve this answer
    
@nategoose:I dont think that is a problem. It is a way to let the library know what object files it should contain. –  Eternal Learner Oct 15 '10 at 20:16
    
mylib.a can never be up to older than itself. It should only be on the left of the : Plus see edit. –  nategoose Oct 15 '10 at 20:31
    
@natgoose: I made the change suggested and I get the following error gcc -o myapp main.o mylib.a gcc: mylib.a: No such file or directory make: *** [myapp] Error 1 –  Eternal Learner Oct 15 '10 at 20:54
    
@Eternal Learner: But you no longer the the make error. Follow up the line above with the action ar rcs $@ $^. This will build your library. The $@ symbol turns into the target name for the current rule and the $^ turns into the files needed to build that target ($@ is left of : and $^ is everything right of :). –  nategoose Oct 15 '10 at 21:12
    
@nategoose : Added the line and get an error: "Undefined Reference" Here is the complete message : ar rcs mylib.a hello.o here.o bye.o gcc -o myapp main.o mylib.a main.o: In function main': /home/usr/molly/main.c:7: undefined reference to hello()' /home/usr/molly/main.c:8: undefined reference to here()' /home/usr/molly/main.c:9: undefined reference to bye()' main.o:(.eh_frame+0x12): undefined reference to `__gxx_personality_v0' collect2: ld returned 1 exit status make: *** [myapp] Error 1 –  Eternal Learner Oct 15 '10 at 21:27
show 1 more comment

Not positive, but:

$(MYLIB):       $(MYLIB)(hello.o) $(MYLIB)(here.o) $(MYLIB)(bye.o)

If I remember my makefile syntax correctly, that line says $(MYLIB) depends on $(MYLIB)... Which of course evaluates to: mylib.a: mylib.a...

share|improve this answer
    
And just to clarify, I think what you want is: $(MYLIB): main.o hello.o here.o bye.o –  Bryan Oct 15 '10 at 20:03
    
@Bryan: I dont think that is a problem. It is a way to let the library know what object files it should contain. –  Eternal Learner Oct 15 '10 at 20:16
    
@Eternal Learner: The makefile syntax is target: dependencies... If your goal is to compile hello.o, here.o, and bye.o into a single .a file, that is not the correct way to do it. All that line is doing is saying which files $(MYLIB) depends on, and right now, $(MYLIB) depends on $(MYLIB) which is recursive. –  Bryan Oct 15 '10 at 20:31
    
I guess the real question comes down to, what are you trying to do on that line? If you're just trying to say "mylib.a depends on the .o files I used to compile the .a", well... The .a will change anyway when you recompile, so the file itself will be out of date. Either way, I'm pretty sure that's where your recursive error comes from. –  Bryan Oct 15 '10 at 20:37
    
@Bryan: I made the change suggested by you. and I get the file not found error:` gcc -o myapp main.o mylib.a gcc: mylib.a: No such file or directory make: *** [myapp] Error 1 ` –  Eternal Learner Oct 15 '10 at 20:43
show 1 more comment

Drop the extraneous $(MYLIB) in the dependency list. That is:

$(MYLIB):       $(MYLIB)(hello.o) $(MYLIB)(here.o) $(MYLIB)(bye.o)

should be:

$(MYLIB):       hello.o here.o bye.o
share|improve this answer
    
I dont think that is a problem. It is a way to let the library know what object files it should contain. –  Eternal Learner Oct 15 '10 at 20:15
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