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I've responded to threads here (or at least commented) with answers containing code like this, but I'm wondering if it's good or bad form to write a series of if branches with one (or more) of the branches doing nothing in them, generally to eliminate checking for null in every branch.

An example (C# code):

if (str == null) { /* Do nothing */ }
else if (str == "SomeSpecialValue")
{
    // ...
}
else if (str.Length > 1)
{
    // ...
}

instead of:

if (str != null && str == "SomeSpecialValue")
{
    // ...
}
else if (str != null && str.Length > 1)
{
    // ...
}

And, of course, this is just an example, as I tend to use these with larger and more complex classes. And in most of these cases, a null value would indicate to do nothing.

For me, this reduces the complication of my code and makes sense when I see it. So, is this good or bad form (a code smell, even)?

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1  
I think it's fine if it makes your code more readable and avoids convoluted conditions. Voting to close though, "is this good or bad" is way too subjective. –  casablanca Oct 15 '10 at 21:15
3  
The fact that all these checks are needed "just in case" the value is null is a smell in itself, IMHO. By doing this you are hiding bugs. –  SimonJ Oct 15 '10 at 21:27
1  
@SimonJ: Good point. At least in this case, he ought to throw an exception if a null value wasn't expected. –  casablanca Oct 15 '10 at 21:30
3  
I'd put '{ /* do nothing--dodge 'else-ifs' */ }' on its own line rather than on the line with the first 'if'. –  supercat Oct 15 '10 at 21:30
    
This is bad form. One of the best rules of thumb when coding is "do something once and never again." This applies both on the large scale (by refactoring common functionality into a single package or class) and on the small scale (by checking a conditional value only once). The ONLY time you can get away with this is in the XOR scenario (i.e., "if (x == null && y == null) {...} else if (x != null && y != null) {...}") where the logic forces you to do similar checks multiple times. –  Kevin Sitze Nov 14 '12 at 0:06
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8 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

It is indeed good to avoid the following, because it needlessly re-checks one of the conditions (the fact that the compiler will optimize this away is beside the point--it potentially makes more work for folks trying to read your code):

if (str != null && str == "SomeSpecialValue")
{
    // ...
}
else if (str != null && str.Length > 1)
{
    // ...
}

But it's also rather bizarre to do what you suggested, below:

if (str == null) { /* Do nothing */ }
else if (str == "SomeSpecialValue")
{
    // ...
}
else if (str.Length > 1)
{
    // ...
}

I say this is bizarre because it obfuscates your intent and defies the reader's expectations. If you check for a condition, people expect you to do something if it is satisfied--but you're not. This is because your intent is not to actually process the null condition, but rather to avoid a null pointer when you check the two conditions you're actually interested in. In effect, rather than having two conceptual states to handle, with a sanity provision (non-null input), it reads instead like you have three conceptual states to handle. The fact that, computationally, you could say there are three such states is beside the point--it's less clear.

The usual case approach in this sort of situation is as Oren A suggested--check for the null, and then check the other conditions within the result block:

if (str != null) 
{
 if (str == "SomeSpecialValue")
 {
    // ...
 }
 else if (str.Length > 1)
 {
    // ...
 }
}

This is little more than a matter of readability-enhancing style, as opposed to an issue of code smell.

EDIT: However, if you're set on the do-nothing condition, I do very much like that you included a "do nothing" comment. Otherwise, folks might think you simply forgot to complete the code.

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See edit - I took that (the "[NULL]" string) out because people were getting hung up on that. –  palswim Oct 15 '10 at 21:45
    
@palswim Okay. But note that wasn't really the main point of my answer. (But at the same time, that code came from somewhere--if it's production code, it's almost certainly a bad thing). –  user359996 Oct 15 '10 at 22:05
    
@user359996: Nope; I didn't want to copy and paste my production code. I was trying to think of an example on the spot. –  palswim Oct 15 '10 at 22:07
1  
I think it would be fair to say that my brain does have a code smell. Any time I try to provide an example on this site, someone points out a bad practice in the sample, usually about the example data I've chosen. –  palswim Oct 15 '10 at 22:37
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I prefer doing it like this-

if (str != null) 
{
 if (str == "[NULL]")
 {
    // ...
 }
 else if (str.Length > 1)
 {
    // ...
 }
}  

I think you can always "reword" an if with an empty body into it's negation with a body, and that it looks better and makes more sense.

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1  
I think I have an aversion to too much indentation. It also saves me a bit of vertical space, and in C#, at least, I'm sure the compiler will handle it well. –  palswim Oct 15 '10 at 21:25
1  
The compiler will handle it well, but IMHO what you're saying has an awkward logic. Why say "if... then do nothing", when you can say "if not.. than do.." About the identation, you can reduce the number of spaces a tab takes, which may help at least a bit. –  Oren A Oct 15 '10 at 21:29
2  
Not wanting to properly format code is not a good argument against writing code properly. –  nearlymonolith Oct 15 '10 at 21:46
1  
this is a lot more readable - –  pm100 Oct 15 '10 at 22:27
2  
+1 Doing things the obvious, logical and idiomatic has the best chance of resulting in obvious, logical and idiomatic code. –  Jon Hanna Oct 15 '10 at 23:39
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I would normally put a return or something like that in the first if:

void Foo()
{
  if (str == null) { return; }
  if (str == "SomeSpecialValue")
  {
      // ...
  }
  else if (str.Length > 1)
  {
      // ...
  }
}

If you can't do this, because the function does something else after the if/else, I'd say it's time to refactor, and split the if/else part out into a separate function, from which you can return early.

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I don't like your indentation style, but this piece of code is the best way, IMHO, to solve the OP's problem. +1 –  rmeador Oct 15 '10 at 22:04
    
@rmeador: Interesting; which indentation style do you like? –  palswim Oct 15 '10 at 22:19
    
it's not really "my" indentation style, I just tried to stick with the OP's. :) –  jalf Oct 16 '10 at 12:56
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In this particular case I will return early and it makes code easier to read

if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(str)) { return; }  

I like to put an explicit return statement.

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1  
That only works if the function does nothing else but the if...else block. –  palswim Oct 15 '10 at 21:22
    
This really depends on the semantics of the problem. Very rarely does a null argument mean "do nothing". All too often it means someone has made a mistake, and by silently returning, you're just aggravating the problem. If it's not life-support or the military, fail-fast is often a good idea. –  user359996 Oct 15 '10 at 21:46
    
I completely agree with you and I always do fail fast. I am only replying to this particular question where the use for whatever reason want's to return. This often happens in batch processing where instead of failing you just skip and possibly log what entity was skipped. –  Pratik Oct 15 '10 at 22:24
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It all depends on context. If putting an empty if statement makes the code more readable, then go for that.

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Yes, but always document it when you do that. Or, if you're like me and try to make code that doesn't need comments and you're not working in a language that forces everything to be in a class, call a method named Nothing(). –  Loren Pechtel Oct 15 '10 at 22:51
    
I'm used to working with Python, which has 'pass' included in it (a statement to do nothing). –  muad_dib Oct 18 '10 at 16:08
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Yes it is a code smell.

One indication is that you thought to ask this question.

Another indication is that the code looks incomplete- as if something should belong there. It may be readable sure, but it feels off.

When reading that code, an outsider has to stop for a second and use brainpower to determine if the code is valid/complete/correct/as intended/adjective.

user359996 hit the nail on the head:

I say this is bizarre because it obfuscates your intent and defies the reader's expectations.

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I don't think that "thinking to ask the question" is necessarily a bad indicator. Almost none of the code I see, even classic examples of 'good code', looks good to me. Almost every design pattern looks like a code smell to me, for example. Almost every example of procedural code makes me "stop for a second and use brainpower" to figure out what was intended. –  Ken Oct 19 '10 at 0:14
1  
@Ken In general "thinking to ask" may not be a sign of a code smell, but in this situation Id say it was. If no code looks good to you, you either are reading the wrong source, or for some reason just don't like the look of code. (Many) Design patterns are not code smells... exposures of weakness in a language maybe. For the above example- there are better things to get 'stopped on' and expend brain power for than simple code that looks incomplete. I am sorry procedural code causes you trouble. –  Tom Neyland Oct 19 '10 at 16:41
    
instanceofTom: I am sorry a pair of braces with no statements causes you trouble. –  Ken Oct 19 '10 at 18:15
1  
@Ken, insert witty response here –  Tom Neyland Oct 19 '10 at 19:58
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Your first example is perfectly readable to me -- doesn't smell at all.

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It's readable, whether it is good or bad depends upon what you are trying to achieve - generally long nested "goes-on-forever" type if statements are bad. Don't forget about static string methods baked into the framework: string.IsNullOrEmpty() and string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace().

Your if (str == null) { /* Do nothing */ } line is unusual, but does have one positive point: it is letting other developers know up front that you are deliberately doing nothing for that case, with your long if/else if structure your intentions could become unclear if you changed it to

if (str != null) 
{ 
    /* carry on with the rest of the tests */
}
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