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Given this code which prints all the bits in an integer out:

private string getBitLiteral(bool bitVal)
{
    if (bitVal)
    {
        return ("1");
    }
    else
    {
        return ("0");
    }
}

 

    Int64 intThisHand = 127;

    for (int i = 64; i > 0; i--)
    {
        HttpContext.Current.Response.Write(
            getBitLiteral((intThisHand & (1 << i)) != 0)
        );
    }

Why does it print out:

1000000000000000000000000011111110000000000000000000000000111111

Firstly am I looper correctly as I expect the last 7 digits to be 1's

Secondly, why are there some 1's in the middle? I would expect them all to be 0 except the trailing 7 1's.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 18 down vote accepted

1 << i is a 32 bit integer an thus overflows.
I think 1l << i would fix it.
((long)1)<<i might be more readable.

Additionally you have an off-by-one error. You want to go for 63 to 0 not from 64 to 1. Since 1<<1 is 2 and not 1.

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Ah, how would I modify this so that it will work correctly on 64 bit integers? It's pretty crucial for my project to handle 64 bit integers. –  Tom Gullen Oct 15 '10 at 22:22
    
I think either adding the l suffix or casting it to long would fix that. –  CodesInChaos Oct 15 '10 at 22:23
    
Another way to handle the 64-bit issue is to use ((intThisHand >> i) & 1) != 0. Because intThisHand is already a 64-bit integer, the shifting will be done correctly. –  Michael Madsen Oct 15 '10 at 22:23
    
Super, that was easy! My loop should be for (int i = 63; i >= 0; i--) to fix the leading bit right? –  Tom Gullen Oct 15 '10 at 22:24
    
Yes, you'd want to loop for (int i = 63; i >= 0; i--). The output is exactly what happens when the shifts are being taken mod 32 (so the first bit printed is 127 & 1, the second is 127 & 2^31, etc, and the last is 127 & 2. –  Yuliy Oct 15 '10 at 22:25

Are you curious about why your code is broken, or are you just trying to display the number as binary?

If the latter then you can just do this rather than re-inventing the wheel:

string asBinary = Convert.ToString(intThisHand, 2);

Or, if you want to pad out all 64 digits:

string asBinary = Convert.ToString(intThisHand, 2).PadLeft(64, '0');
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Good solution thank you! –  Tom Gullen Oct 15 '10 at 22:56

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