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This stored procedure doesn't work. I've checked the SQL and it returns the correct value when parsed directly to the DB. It's really strange! It just returns 0 rows.

What could be wrong?

ALTER PROCEDURE dbo.GetSaltOfUser

 (
 @eMail nvarchar

 )

AS
DECLARE @result nvarchar
 /* SET NOCOUNT ON */
BEGIN
   SELECT @result = salt
   FROM UserSet
   WHERE eMail = @eMail
   RETURN @result
END
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How are you calling it –  rerun Oct 15 '10 at 23:01
    
From where I write it in Visual studio. I right click and choose Execute. –  Phil Oct 15 '10 at 23:03
    
How are you determining the return value? –  Martin Smith Oct 15 '10 at 23:07
    
wth, what's with the oops tag? I should have that on all of my questions.. "oops, I didn't know enough" :) –  Phil Oct 16 '10 at 3:14

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted
 @eMail nvarchar

Will truncate the passed in email to one character. You need to put in a length. e.g.

  @eMail nvarchar(50)

This should match the datatype of the relevant column in UserSet

Also do you really want to be using the return code for this or do you want to use an output parameter perhaps - or just a scalar select?

ALTER PROCEDURE dbo.GetSaltOfUser

    (
    @eMail nvarchar (50),      /*Should match datatype of UserSet.eMail*/
    @salt nvarchar (50) OUTPUT /*Should match datatype of UserSet.salt*/
  )

AS
BEGIN
    SET NOCOUNT ON

    SELECT @result = salt
    FROM UserSet
    WHERE eMail = @eMail
END

And to call it

DECLARE @salt nvarchar(50)
EXECUTE dbo.GetSaltOfUser N'abc@example.com', @salt OUTPUT
SELECT @salt
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Oh that simple? Thanks, I'm lucky I bumped in to that this early on in the project. –  Phil Oct 15 '10 at 23:13
    
And to answer your question; it is correct that I was looking for the output parameter. Is it better practice to always have an output paramter even though the command is fairly simple? –  Phil Oct 15 '10 at 23:17
    
@Phil - Yes. I believe an OUTPUT parameter is more light weight than a scalar select. –  Martin Smith Oct 15 '10 at 23:18

You do not need to assign the salt to a variable.

CREATE PROCEDURE dbo.GetSaltOfUser
(
    @eMail nvarchar    
)
AS
BEGIN
    SELECT salt
    FROM UserSet
    WHERE eMail = @eMail
END
share|improve this answer
    
As it seems, I CAN'T return a var since it has to be an integer? Does this only apply to the "RETURN" command? –  Phil Oct 15 '10 at 23:14
    
It will return salt in whatever datatype it is. You could cast that as anything that you want, with in scope obviously. CAST(salt AS nvarchar(50)) AS salt –  Dustin Laine Oct 15 '10 at 23:16

Two Cents from my end

  • Good you are using SET NOCOUNT ON
  • Always use RETURN to return status code, Example 0- success, 1 - failure
  • Use SELECT to return the ROWS
  • Use Try Catch to handle Error Conditions
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