Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In the How Can I Expose Only a Fragment of IList<> question one of the answers had the following code snippet:

IEnumerable<object> FilteredList()
{
    foreach( object item in FullList )
    {
        if( IsItemInPartialList( item )
            yield return item;
    }
}

What does the yield keyword do there? I've seen it referenced in a couple places, and one other question, but I haven't quite figured out what it actually does. I'm used to thinking of yield in the sense of one thread yielding to another, but that doesn't seem relevant here.

share|improve this question
    
Here is a very good technical explanation: blogs.msdn.com/oldnewthing/archive/2008/08/12/8849519.aspx –  Nir Sep 2 '08 at 13:21
    
Just MSDN link about it is here msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/vstudio/9k7k7cf0.aspx –  Clark Kent Apr 24 '13 at 18:44
1  
This is not surprising. The confusion comes from the fact that we are conditioned to see "return" as a function output while preceded by a "yield" it is not. –  Larry Feb 20 at 11:37

11 Answers 11

up vote 216 down vote accepted

The yield keyword actually does quite a lot here. The function returns an object that implements the IEnumerable interface. If a calling function starts foreach-ing over this object the function is called again until it "yields". This is syntactic sugar introduced in C# 2.0. In earlier versions you had to create your own IEnumerable and IEnumerator objects to do stuff like this.

The easiest way understand code like this is to type in an example, set some breakpoints and see what happens.

Try stepping through this for example:

public void Consumer()
{
    foreach(int i in Integers())
    {
        Console.WriteLine(i.ToString());
    }
}

public IEnumerable<int> Integers()
{
    yield return 1;
    yield return 2;
    yield return 4;
    yield return 8;
    yield return 16;
    yield return 16777216;
}
share|improve this answer
6  
why not have Integers just be a list? –  leora Dec 21 '08 at 12:19
45  
In this case that would be easier, i'm just using the integer here to show how yield return works. The nice things about using yield return is that it's a very quick way of implementing the iterator pattern, so things are evaluated lazly. –  Mendelt Dec 22 '08 at 8:35
8  
This makes a lot more sense than anything else I've read on the subject. –  Spencer Ruport Mar 2 '10 at 18:19
33  
Also worth noting you can use yield break; when you don't want to return any more items. –  Rory May 17 '11 at 18:13
10  
When you step through the example you'll find the first call to Integers() returns 1. The second call returns 2 and the line "yield return 1" is not executed again. –  Brian Leeming Nov 15 '12 at 16:31

Iteration. It creates a state machine "under the covers" that remembers where you were on each additional cycle of the function and picks up from there.

share|improve this answer
4  
nice, you have cut right the meat of the question/answer –  Exitos Nov 21 '12 at 9:31
3  
+1 for a very concise and meaningful answer. –  Lynn Crumbling Jan 23 '13 at 19:36
    
This is it! The answer that actually answers the question. –  Mircea Ion Feb 13 at 16:28
1  
this combined with @Shivprasad Koirala's video (youtube.com/watch?v=4fju3xcm21M) is the perfect answer –  TruthOf42 Feb 14 at 16:11

Recently Raymond Chen also ran an interesting series of articles on the yield keyword.

While it's nominally used for easily implementing an iterator pattern, but can be generalized into a state machine. No point in quoting Raymond, the last part also links to other uses (but the example in Entin's blog is esp good, showing how to write async safe code).

share|improve this answer
    
This needs to be up voted. Sweet how he explains the purpose of the operator and internals. –  sajidnizami Jun 14 '11 at 10:45
1  
part 1 explains the syntactic sugar of "yield return". excellent explaining! –  wilenx Feb 11 '13 at 11:04

Yield has two great uses

  1. It helps to provide custom iteration with out creating temp collections.

  2. It helps to do stateful iteration.

In order to explain the above two points more demonstratively, I have created a simple video and the link for same is here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4fju3xcm21M

share|improve this answer
    
Gave my vote to this answer since i'm more of a visual guy and this video is fantastic. –  PussInBoots Dec 12 '13 at 11:24

Intuitively, the keyword returns a value from the function without leaving it, i.e. in your code example it returns the current item value and then resumes the loop. More formally, it is used by the compiler to generate code for an iterator. Iterators are functions that return IEnumerable objects. The MSDN has several articles about them.

share|improve this answer
1  
Well, to be precise it does not resume the loop, it pauses it until the parent calls "iterator.next()". –  jitbit Jul 10 '13 at 12:15
2  
@jitbit That’s why I used “intuitively” and “more formally”. –  Konrad Rudolph Jul 10 '13 at 12:16

The C# yield keyword, to put is simply, allows many calls to a body of code, referred to as an iterator, that knows how to return before it's done and, when called again, continues where it left off - i.e. it helps an iterator become transparently stateful per each item in a sequence that the iterator returns in successive calls.

share|improve this answer

"yield return" is used with enumerators. On each call of yield statement, control is returned to the caller but it ensures that the callee's state is maintained. Due to this, when the caller enumerates the next element, it continues execution in the callee method from statement immediately after the yield statement.

Let us try to understand this with an example. In this example, corresponding to each line I have mentioned the order in which execution flows.

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        foreach (int fib in Fibs(6))//1, 5
        {
            Console.WriteLine(fib + " ");//4, 10
        }            
    }

    static IEnumerable<int> Fibs(int fibCount)
    {
        for (int i = 0, prevFib = 0, currFib = 1; i < fibCount; i++)//2
        {
            yield return prevFib;//3, 9
            int newFib = prevFib + currFib;//6
            prevFib = currFib;//7
            currFib = newFib;//8
        }
    }

Also, the state is maintained for each enumeration. Suppose, I have another call to Fibs() method then the state will be reset for it.

share|improve this answer

It is a very simple and easy way to create an enumerable for your object. The compiler creates a class that wraps your method and that implements, in this case, IEnumerable<object>. Without the yield keyword, you'd have to create an object that implements IEnumerable<object>.

share|improve this answer

It's producing enumerable sequence. What it does is actually creating local IEnumerable sequence and returning it as a method result

share|improve this answer

It's trying to bring in some Ruby Goodness :)
Concept: This is some sample Ruby Code that prints out each element of the array

 rubyArray = [1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10]
    rubyArray.each{|x| 
        puts x   # do whatever with x
    }

The Array's each method implementation yields control over to the caller (the 'puts x') with each element of the array neatly presented as x. The caller can then do whatever it needs to do with x.

However .Net doesn't go all the way here.. C# seems to have coupled yield with IEnumerable, in a way forcing you to write a foreach loop in the caller as seen in Mendelt's response. Little less elegant.

//calling code
foreach(int i in obCustomClass.Each())
{
    Console.WriteLine(i.ToString());
}

// CustomClass implementation
private int[] data = {1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10};
public IEnumerable<int> Each()
{
   for(int iLooper=0; iLooper<data.Length; ++iLooper)
        yield return data[iLooper]; 
}
share|improve this answer
2  
-1 This answer does not sound right to me. Yes, C# yield is coupled with IEnumerable, and C# lacks the Ruby concept of a "block". But C# has lambdas, which could allow the implementation of a ForEach method, much alike Ruby's each. This that does not mean it would be a good idea to do so, though. –  rsenna May 15 '13 at 19:27

Once you have a good grasp of how iterator blocks work, Eric Lippert has an excellent series of blog posts on some of the seemingly odd restrictions on the generality of iterator blocks.

share|improve this answer

protected by Community May 11 at 14:49

Thank you for your interest in this question. Because it has attracted low-quality answers, posting an answer now requires 10 reputation on this site.

Would you like to answer one of these unanswered questions instead?

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.