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I'm doing K&R Exercise 5-4 (p107).

Write the function strend(s,t) , which returns 1 if the string t occurs at the end of the string s, and zero otherwise.

I figured the best way to do this was to...

  • increment both pointers to the end
  • count backwards through both strings whilst each char matches
  • return 1 if we had finished counting to the beginning of the second string

So here is what I have...

int strend(const char *str1, const char *str2) {
   int i = 0; 
   while (*str1++ != '\0');

   while (*str2++ != '\0') {
      i++;
   }
   i++;

   while (*str2-- == *str1-- && i > 0) {
     i--;
   }

   return (i == 0);
}

As you can see, I used a counter to tell when I had arrived at the beginning of the second string.

Is there any other loop I can use without a counter to tell when we have arrived at the start of the string (similar to looking for \0 for the end of a string)?

Thanks.

Update

Didn't think to use pointers - I'm still learning and forgetting a few things!

I came up with this...

int strend(const char *str1, const char *str2) {
   char *start = str2; 
   while (*str1++ != '\0');

   while (*str2++ != '\0');

   while (*str2-- == *str1--) {
     if (str2 == start) {
         return 1;
     }
   }

   return 0;
}
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second set looks nice & will work as long as str2 is shorter or equal to than str1 –  slashmais Oct 16 '10 at 12:07
    
I think your second implementation might cause segmentation fault when str2 and str1 is not the same length. str1 and str2 after incrementing loop also passed the end of string. –  tia Oct 16 '10 at 12:12
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5 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Check for matching pointers?

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How does this look? Thanks for the suggestion. –  alex Oct 16 '10 at 11:50
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Compare the address of the current character to the original string pointer? If they match, then the current character must be the first one and thus the start of the string.

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Are you allowed to use standard C functions? If so, you can use strlen() to get the length of each string.

E.G,

int lenS = strlen(s);
int lenT = strlen(t);

for (int i = 0; i < lenT; ++i) {
  if (s[lenS - i] != t[lenT - i])
    return 0;
}

return 1;
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There is no indicator at the beginning of C strings that identify that is where the string begins. You have to keep some reference to the beginning of the string, like making a copy of the pointer str1.

Also, for this exercise, you do not have to do it with backward scanning. You can do it with using forward scanning and there are certain checks you can make to see if it's worthwhile to even bother seeing if str2 is in str1.

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What sort of checks would you recommend? Perhaps making sure substring's size is smaller or equal to search string? –  alex Oct 16 '10 at 11:54
    
That is certainly the check - for strend(s, t), there's no point in doing anything further if strlen(t) > strlen(s). The rest of the problem can be solved with a little pointer manipulation. ;) –  birryree Oct 16 '10 at 12:02
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if you're allowed to use string functions:

int strend(char *s, char *t)
{
    char *st = s + strlen(s) - strlen(t);
    if (st < s) return 0;
    if (!strcmp(st,t)) return 1;
    return 0;
}

Even better by tia (comments):

int strend(char *s, char *t)
{
    char *st = s + strlen(s) - strlen(t);
    if (st >= s) return !(strcmp(st,t)); else return 0

}

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1  
I don't think you'll need that last else there. Thanks for your answer. –  alex Oct 16 '10 at 12:00
    
yep, fixed, thanx –  slashmais Oct 16 '10 at 12:03
    
I think you can return it right away. Also need to check for the position of st like if (st >= s) return !(strcmp(st,t)); else return 0 (I insist to put else for readability :D); –  tia Oct 16 '10 at 12:20
    
@tia: function must return 0 or 1, strcmp returns the difference beteen the ascii-values of the first mismatch - so may be negative. Your version is nicer, more compact, though. –  slashmais Oct 16 '10 at 13:23
    
@slashmais the result or ! operator can only be either 0 or 1. –  tia Oct 16 '10 at 16:01
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