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Question says it all really. Code can be found at the following link -> http://www.mindrot.org/projects/jBCrypt/

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

First, it's not documented as thread-safe, so for all intents and purposes, it's not. And, on further investigation, it's definitely not: It turns out that, while there are some instance fields, there is no instance of BCrypt exposed; it tries to do everything through static methods. It may not be thread safe. It's small enough that, assuming you care and the author would accept, you could offer a patch to trivially convert it to provide separate, safe instances (edit to add: I have scrubbed it carefully and prepared a cleaner version, which I will send to the author...)

Second, in what manner do you want to use this in a multithreaded environment? It's not clear to me what you'd want to do in separate threads.

NOTE: There is a dissenting opinion below with more upvotes as of 7/18/2013

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When hashing the passwords for users in a web app. Each user logging in/creating a password is going to spawn a new thread –  McGin Oct 16 '10 at 16:38
    
Well, it looks like separate instances of BCrypt could be used in separate threads. As Stephen C notes, it's pretty badly designed, so it's not even clear that separate instances wouldn't interact via static accesses. I'd look for a better implementation... –  andersoj Oct 16 '10 at 17:40
    
@McGin: PM me at andersoj at NO andersoj SPAM dot org to get a cleaner, refactored version. I spent too much time on this, mostly out of curiosity about blowfish. –  andersoj Oct 16 '10 at 18:59
    
@andersoj "It may not thread safe": typo in the most critical sentence, that makes the meaning ambiguous, could you please edit it? I am interested, where is your patch? Thanks a lot! Associated issue: code.google.com/p/jbcrypt/issues/detail?id=2 –  Nicolas Raoul Dec 29 '11 at 8:03
2  
This is a poor answer, IMO. Claims like this (especially associated with a library used to implement security mechanisms) should be accompanied by example usage demonstrating the problem, or at least concrete citations of shared fields, reused instances, or other non-thread-safe constructions. Casual API critiques don't count, especially when you're not clear on what the intended usage patterns are. I have left an alternative answer, FWIW. –  cemerick Jul 18 '13 at 14:11

I strongly disagree with the existing answers, and the currently-accepted answer.

After a brief review of the source code for jBcrypt, I'm satisfied that it is thread-safe. The only instance created does not escape the scope of the key hashpw static method, and its fields are not shared with any other instances through any mechanism that I can see.

Further, I'm really confused by the complaints about the API consisting of static methods. Hashing functions are pure, and so there is no reason to not provide them via static methods. I'm actually quite glad that there is no usable userland access to instance methods, lest some fool try to do something clever (like using one instance over and over, "resetting" it to minimize allocation/GC or some such silliness).

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I've reviewed the source code, and my findings are the same. I also share your confusion about the complaints about static methods. Why wouldn't you use static methods for pure functions? –  weavejester Jul 18 '13 at 14:22
    
One reason: Static methods are death to testability - misko.hevery.com/2008/12/15/… –  Matthew Gilliard Jul 18 '13 at 14:31
2  
@MatthewGilliard There are effectively no decomposable units in this code; it is an implementation of a hashing algorithm. The 'unit' in this case is defined by the boundary of the algorithm, and nothing smaller. i.e. this is the perfect application of a static method. Also, the cited blog post contains a number of dubious claims, but that's wildly OT. :-) –  cemerick Jul 18 '13 at 14:38
2  
having the primary interface to the algorithm happen in a static method makes it hard to test other code that uses hashing. This is an unfortunate limitation of the testing frameworks, but it does mean that in practice someone would wrap this code in something they could mock –  Cosmin Stejerean Jul 18 '13 at 14:46

Resurrecting this old issue because I believe the current answers are wrong and this thread pops high in google searches.

Looked at the code and ran a couple of simple tests. jbcryt appears to be thread safe.

In the code: -although it has mostly static method, those methods create instances of the bcrypt class to do computations when needed.

Test samples: -had bcrypt not been thread safe, I would have expected either of these methods to throw some form of error, which they did not.

@Test
public void multiThreadHash() throws InterruptedException{
    List<Thread> threads = new ArrayList<Thread>();

    for(int i = 0; i<40; i++){
        threads.add(new Thread(){
            @Override
            public void run() {
                long start = System.currentTimeMillis();
                while(System.currentTimeMillis()<start+12000){
                    String password = "sample";
                    String hash = BCrypt.gensalt(4);
                    String hashed = BCrypt.hashpw(password, hash);
                }
            }

        });
    }

    for(Thread t: threads){
        t.start();
    }

    Thread.sleep(12200L);
}

@Test
public void multiThreadReproductibleHash() throws InterruptedException{

    List<Thread> threads = new ArrayList<Thread>();

    for(int i = 0; i<40; i++){
        threads.add(new Thread(){
            @Override
            public void run() {
                long start = System.currentTimeMillis();
                while(System.currentTimeMillis()<start+12000){
                    String password = "sample";
                    String hash = "$2a$04$/YkrS2ifyAloNVUk5qAO7O";
                    String expected = "$2a$04$/YkrS2ifyAloNVUk5qAO7OlqIsp2ECTMDinOij9wvn7nXPRJCo8Gy";
                    String hashed = BCrypt.hashpw(password, hash);
                    Assert.assertEquals(expected, hashed);
                }
            }

        });
    }

    for(Thread t: threads){
        t.start();
    }

    Thread.sleep(12200L);
}
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