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I want to find the average rainfall of any three states say CA, TX and AX for a particular month from Jan to Dec . Given input file delimited by TAB SPACES and has the format city name, the state , and then average rainfall amounts from January through December, and then an annual average for all months. EG may look like

AVOCA   PA  30  2.10    2.15    2.55    2.97    3.65    3.98    3.79    3.32     3.31   2.79    3.06    2.51    36.18
BAKERSFIELD CA  30  0.86    1.06    1.04    0.57    0.20    0.10    0.01    0.09    0.17    0.29    0.70    0.63    5.72

What I want to do is "To get the sum of average rainfall for say a particular month feb , over say n years and then find its average for the states CA, TX and AX.

I have written the below script in awk to do the same , but it doesn't give me the expected output

/^CA$/ {CA++; CA_SUM+= $5} # ^CA$ - Regular Expression to match the word CA only 
/^TX$/ {TX++; TX_SUM+= $5} # ^TX$ - Regular Expression to match the word TX only  
/^AX$/ {AX++; AX_SUM+= $5} # ^AX$ - Regular Expression to match the word AX only 
END {
     CA_avg = CA_SUM/CA;
     TX_avg = TX_SUM/TX;
     AX_avg = AX_SUM/AX; 
     printf("CA Rainfall: %5.2f",CA_avg);
     printf("CA Rainfall: %5.2f",TX_avg);
     printf("CA Rainfall: %5.2f",AX_avg);
    }

I invoke the program with the command awk 'FS="\t"'-f awk1.awk rainfall.txt and see no output.

Question: Where am I slipping? Any suggestions and a changed code will be appreciated

share|improve this question
    
You have not yet accurately described your data; the content of column 3 does not appear to be a rainfall amount. It is not clear how you deal with a city with two words in its name (Mountain View, Atlantic City). – Jonathan Leffler Oct 16 '10 at 21:49
up vote 2 down vote accepted

your regexp should be

/ CA / {CA++; cA_SUM+= $5} # ^CA$ - Regular Expression to match the word CA only 
/ TX / {TX++; TX_SUM+= $5} # ^TX$ - Regular Expression to match the word TX only  
/ AX / {AX++; AX_SUM+= $5} # ^AX$ - Regular Expression to match the word AX only 

/^AX$/ match only if it is the only word in the line

HTH!

EDIT

/ CA / {CA++; CA_SUM+= $5} # ^CA$ - Regular Expression to match the word CA only 
/ TX / {TX++; TX_SUM+= $5} # ^TX$ - Regular Expression to match the word TX only  
/ AX / {AX++; AX_SUM+= $5} # ^AX$ - Regular Expression to match the word AX only 
END {

 if(CA!=0){CA_avg = CA_SUM/CA;     printf("CA Rainfall: %5.2f",CA_avg);}
 if(TX!=0){TX_avg = TX_SUM/TX;     printf("TX Rainfall: %5.2f",TX_avg);}
 if(AX!=0){TX_avg = AX_SUM/CA;     printf("AX Rainfall: %5.2f",AX_avg);}
}
share|improve this answer
    
@belisarius - does not work - I see no output again . – Eternal Learner Oct 16 '10 at 21:19
    
@Eternal try remuving your FS from the comand line – Dr. belisarius Oct 16 '10 at 21:32
    
@belisarius: Gives me a division by zero error – Eternal Learner Oct 16 '10 at 21:32
    
@eternal wait ... testing – Dr. belisarius Oct 16 '10 at 21:33
    
@belisarius: I tried something like this and I got a division by zero error BEGIN { FS = "\t" } ; /\\tCA\\t/ {CA++; cA_SUM+= $5} # ^CA$ - Regular Expression to match the word CA only /\\tTX\\t/ {TX++; TX_SUM+= $5} # ^TX$ - Regular Expression to match the word TX only /\\tAX\\t/ {AX++; AX_SUM+= $5} # ^AX$ - Regular Expression to match the word AX only END { CA_avg = CA_SUM/CA; TX_avg = TX_SUM/TX; AX_avg = AX_SUM/AX; printf("CA Rainfall: %5.2f",CA_avg); printf("CA Rainfall: %5.2f",TX_avg); printf("CA Rainfall: %5.2f",AX_avg); } – Eternal Learner Oct 16 '10 at 21:42

The pattern /^CA$/ means the characters "C" and "A" are the only characters on the line. You want:

$2 == "CA" {CA++; CA_SUM+= $5}
# etc.

However, this is DRYer:

{ count[$2]++; sum[$2] += $5 }
END {
    for (state in count) {
        printf("%s Rainfall: %5.2f\n", state, sum[state]/count[state])
    }
}

Also, this looks wrong: awk 'FS="\t"'-f awk1.awk rainfall.txt
try: awk -F '\t' -f awk1.awk rainfall.txt


Response to comments:

awk -F '\t' -v month=2 -v states="CA,AZ,TX" '
    BEGIN {
        month_col = month + 3  # assume January is month 1
        split(states, wanted_states, /,/)
    }
    { count[$2]++; sum[$2] += $month_col }
    END {
        for (state in wanted_states) {
            if (state in count) {
                printf("%s Rainfall: %5.2f\n", state, sum[state]/count[state])
            else
                print state " Rainfall: no data"
        }
    }
' rainfall.txt
share|improve this answer
1  
+1 for a more general solution and mentioning DRY in the context of rain. – schot Oct 18 '10 at 6:42
    
+1 Much better than mine. I was thinking only in correcting the OP errors, which begets always a shortsighted answer. You may improve it a bit more by allowing a parameter in the command line for the month number. Just my 2 cents. – Dr. belisarius Oct 20 '10 at 22:00
    
You could change your DRY version to select particular states: awk -v statelist="AK CA TX" 'match(statelist,$2){ count[$2]++; sum[$2] += $5 } .... Or use a shell variable instead of the literal states="AK CA TX"; awk -v statelist=$states '...' – Dennis Williamson Oct 26 '10 at 2:35

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