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I have an array, and am looking for duplicates.

duplicates=false;
for (j=0;j<zipcodeList.length;j++)
  for (k=0;k<zipcodeList.length;k++)
    if (zipcodeList[k]==zipcodeList[j]){
      duplicates=true;
     }

However, this code doesnt work when there are no duplicates. Whys that?

share|improve this question
    
What is "doesn't work" exactly? As in, what is happening vs. what do you expect to happen? –  eldarerathis Oct 17 '10 at 1:18
    
duplicates has the wrong value –  moby Oct 17 '10 at 1:19
    
possible duplicate of Java: Detect duplicates in ArrayList? -- It's not entirely the same but... note the use of a Set/intermediate "store" vs. a nested loop. In your case, zipcodeList[k] == zipcodeList[j] for every k == j. –  user166390 Oct 17 '10 at 1:19
    
duplicate=false –  moby Oct 17 '10 at 1:19
1  
He's expecting duplicates to be false, but every time there are more than 0 elements in the array, the loop will set duplicates to true. –  Jonathon Faust Oct 17 '10 at 1:20
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8 Answers

up vote 43 down vote accepted

On the nose answer..

duplicates=false;
for (j=0;j<zipcodeList.length;j++)
  for (k=j+1;k<zipcodeList.length;k++)
    if (k!=j && zipcodeList[k] == zipcodeList[j])
      duplicates=true;

Edited to switch .equals() back to == since I read somewhere you're using int, which wasn't clear in the initial question. Also to set k=j+1, to halve execution time, but it's still O(n2).

A faster (in the limit) way

Here's a hash based approach. You gotta pay for the autoboxing, but it's O(n) instead of O(n2). An enterprising soul would go find a primitive int-based hash set (Apache or Google Collections has such a thing, methinks.)

boolean duplicates(final int[] zipcodelist)
{
  Set<Integer> lump = new HashSet<Integer>();
  for (int i : zipcodelist)
  {
    if (lump.contains(i)) return true;
    lump.add(i);
  }
  return false;
}

Bow to HuyLe

See HuyLe's answer for a more or less O(n) solution, which I think needs a couple of add'l steps:

static boolean duplicates(final int[] zipcodelist)
{
   final int MAXZIP = 99999;
   boolean[] bitmap = new boolean[MAXZIP+1];
   java.util.Arrays.fill(bitmap, false);
   for (int item : zipcodeList)
     if (!bitmap[item]) bitmap[item] = true;
     else return true;
   }
   return false;
}

Or Just to be Compact

static boolean duplicates(final int[] zipcodelist)
{
   final int MAXZIP = 99999;
   boolean[] bitmap = new boolean[MAXZIP+1];  // Java guarantees init to false
   for (int item : zipcodeList)
     if (!(bitmap[item] ^= true)) return true;
   return false;
}

Does it Matter?

Well, so I ran a little benchmark, which is iffy all over the place, but here's the code:

import java.util.BitSet;

class Yuk
{
  static boolean duplicatesZero(final int[] zipcodelist)
  {
    boolean duplicates=false;
    for (int j=0;j<zipcodelist.length;j++)
      for (int k=j+1;k<zipcodelist.length;k++)
        if (k!=j && zipcodelist[k] == zipcodelist[j])
          duplicates=true;

    return duplicates;
  }


  static boolean duplicatesOne(final int[] zipcodelist)
  {
    final int MAXZIP = 99999;
    boolean[] bitmap = new boolean[MAXZIP + 1];
    java.util.Arrays.fill(bitmap, false);
    for (int item : zipcodelist) {
      if (!(bitmap[item] ^= true))
        return true;
    }
    return false;
  }

  static boolean duplicatesTwo(final int[] zipcodelist)
  {
    final int MAXZIP = 99999;

    BitSet b = new BitSet(MAXZIP + 1);
    b.set(0, MAXZIP, false);
    for (int item : zipcodelist) {
      if (!b.get(item)) {
        b.set(item, true);
      } else
        return true;
    }
    return false;
  }

  enum ApproachT { NSQUARED, HASHSET, BITSET};

  /**
   * @param args
   */
  public static void main(String[] args)
  {
    ApproachT approach = ApproachT.BITSET;

    final int REPS = 100;
    final int MAXZIP = 99999;

    int[] sizes = new int[] { 10, 1000, 10000, 100000, 1000000 };
    long[][] times = new long[sizes.length][REPS];

    boolean tossme = false;

    for (int sizei = 0; sizei < sizes.length; sizei++) {
      System.err.println("Trial for zipcodelist size= "+sizes[sizei]);
      for (int rep = 0; rep < REPS; rep++) {
        int[] zipcodelist = new int[sizes[sizei]];
        for (int i = 0; i < zipcodelist.length; i++) {
          zipcodelist[i] = (int) (Math.random() * (MAXZIP + 1));
        }
        long begin = System.currentTimeMillis();
        switch (approach) {
        case NSQUARED :
          tossme ^= (duplicatesZero(zipcodelist));
          break;
        case HASHSET :
          tossme ^= (duplicatesOne(zipcodelist));
          break;
        case BITSET :
          tossme ^= (duplicatesTwo(zipcodelist));
          break;

        }
        long end = System.currentTimeMillis();
        times[sizei][rep] = end - begin;


      }
      long avg = 0;
      for (int rep = 0; rep < REPS; rep++) {
        avg += times[sizei][rep];
      }
      System.err.println("Size=" + sizes[sizei] + ", avg time = "
            + avg / (double)REPS + "ms");
    }
  }

}

With NSQUARED:

Trial for size= 10
Size=10, avg time = 0.0ms
Trial for size= 1000
Size=1000, avg time = 0.0ms
Trial for size= 10000
Size=10000, avg time = 100.0ms
Trial for size= 100000
Size=100000, avg time = 9923.3ms

With HashSet

Trial for zipcodelist size= 10
Size=10, avg time = 0.16ms
Trial for zipcodelist size= 1000
Size=1000, avg time = 0.15ms
Trial for zipcodelist size= 10000
Size=10000, avg time = 0.0ms
Trial for zipcodelist size= 100000
Size=100000, avg time = 0.16ms
Trial for zipcodelist size= 1000000
Size=1000000, avg time = 0.0ms

With BitSet

Trial for zipcodelist size= 10
Size=10, avg time = 0.0ms
Trial for zipcodelist size= 1000
Size=1000, avg time = 0.0ms
Trial for zipcodelist size= 10000
Size=10000, avg time = 0.0ms
Trial for zipcodelist size= 100000
Size=100000, avg time = 0.0ms
Trial for zipcodelist size= 1000000
Size=1000000, avg time = 0.0ms

BITSET Wins!

But only by a hair... .15ms is within the error for currentTimeMillis(), and there are some gaping holes in my benchmark. Note that for any list longer than 100000, you can simply return true because there will be a duplicate. In fact, if the list is anything like random, you can return true WHP for a much shorter list. What's the moral? In the limit, the most efficient implementation is:

 return true;

And you won't be wrong very often.

share|improve this answer
2  
It feels... inelegant. Probably using a hash-based approach is better, especially if zipcodelist gets big. This is a O(n^2), which is a pretty good definition of "doesn't scale well." Nested deathmarches through arrays generally reeks like a long lost BigMac on a difficult-to-reach bookshelf. Better to maintain a Set<ZipCode> and test one by one if the set .contains() the next ZipCode. –  andersoj Oct 17 '10 at 1:30
2  
probably slightly better using BitSet: download.oracle.com/javase/1.4.2/docs/api/java/util/BitSet.html –  Lie Ryan Oct 17 '10 at 2:26
1  
Note the performance, even for a moderately short list (only 100k zipcodes before you hit macroscopic times -- I imagine the USPS processes that many before their crumpets get cold in the AM.) –  andersoj Oct 17 '10 at 3:00
2  
Another alternative: if you're tight on space for whatever reason, you can sort your original list in place, then search for duplicate neighbors, for O(nlogn) time and O(1) space. –  Jander Oct 17 '10 at 5:57
2  
I think for the "A faster (in the limit) way" part and "Bow to HuyLe" part, the time complexity is the same, i.e O(n). Please look this ..>>stackoverflow.com/questions/11166247/… –  WowBow Jun 23 '12 at 3:01
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Let's see how your algorithm works:

an array of unique values:

[1, 2, 3]

check 1 == 1. yes, there is duplicate, assigning duplicate to true.
check 1 == 2. no, doing nothing.
check 1 == 3. no, doing nothing.
check 2 == 1. no, doing nothing.
check 2 == 2. yes, there is duplicate, assigning duplicate to true.
check 2 == 3. no, doing nothing.
check 3 == 1. no, doing nothing.
check 3 == 2. no, doing nothing.
check 3 == 3. yes, there is duplicate, assigning duplicate to true.

a better algorithm:

for (j=0;j<zipcodeList.length;j++) {
    for (k=j+1;k<zipcodeList.length;k++) {
        if (zipcodeList[k]==zipcodeList[j]){ // or use .equals()
            return true;
        }
    }
}
return false;
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You can use bitmap for better performance with large array.

java.util.Arrays.fill(bitmap, false);
for (int item : zipcodeList)
   if (!bitmap[item]) bitmap[item] = true;
   else {
      duplicate = true;
      break;
   }
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+1 given the size of the space (assuming 5-digit zipcodes), great! –  andersoj Oct 17 '10 at 1:55
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To check for duplicates you need to compare distinct pairs.

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Cause you are comparing the first element of the array against itself so It finds that there are duplicates even where there aren't.

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Initialize k = j+1. You won't compare elements to themselves and you'll also not duplicate comparisons. For example, j = 0, k = 1 and k = 0, j = 1 compare the same set of elements. This would remove the k = 0, j = 1 comparison.

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Don't use == use .equals.

try this instead (IIRC, ZipCode needs to implement Comparable for this to work.

boolean unique;
Set<ZipCode> s = new TreeSet<ZipCode>();
for( ZipCode zc : zipcodelist )
    unique||=s.add(zc);
duplicates = !unique;
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public class FindDuplicate {

public static void main(String[] args) {

    // assume the array is sorted, otherwise first we have to sort it.
    // time efficiency is o(n)
    int elementData[] = new int[] { 1, 2, 3, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 8 };
    int count = 1;
    int element1;
    int element2;

    for (int i = 0; i < elementData.length - 1; i++) {
        element1 = elementData[i];
        element2 = elementData[count];
        count++;
        if (element1 == element2) {
            System.out.println(element2);
        }
    }

}

}

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Please explain your code - at least a little bit. –  dirkk Apr 21 at 17:32
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