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How best store year, month, and day in a MySQL database so that it would be easily retrieved by year, by year-month, by year-month-day combinations?

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That is a vague and subjective question but please read this article: richardlord.net/blog/dates-in-php-and-mysql It will guide you in the right direction! –  Trufa Oct 17 '10 at 2:16

7 Answers 7

Let's say you have a table tbl with a column d of type DATE.

All records in 1997:

SELECT * FROM tbl WHERE YEAR(d) = 1997
SELECT * FROM tbl WHERE d BETWEEN '1997-01-01' AND '1997-12-31'

All records in March of 1997:

SELECT * FROM tbl WHERE YEAR(d) = 1997 AND MONTH(d) = 3
SELECT * FROM tbl WHERE d BETWEEN '1997-03-01' AND '1997-03-31'

All records on March 10, 1997:

SELECT * FROM tbl WHERE d = '1997-03-10'
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1  
I'm the farthest thing of a MySQL specialist that there is, but I notice that the MySQL docs suggest explicitly casting string literals to dates when querying (WHERE d BETWEEN CAST('1997-03-01' AS DATE) AND CAST('1997-03-31')). I assume that otherwise, the date column values are converted to strings to allow wildcard comparisons, making it impossible to use an index on the column. –  Larry Lustig Oct 17 '10 at 12:52
    
Larry, I've never heard that before, but it makes a lot of sense. Thanks! –  benzado Oct 18 '10 at 6:08

Unless a time will ever be involved, use the DATE data type. You can use functions from there to select portions of the date.

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I'd recommend the obvious: use a DATE.

It stores year-month-day with no time (hour-minutes-seconds-etc) component.

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Store as date and use built in functions:day(), month() or year() to return the combination you wish.

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What's wrong with DATE? As long as you need Y, Y-M, or Y-M-D searches, they should be indexable. The problem with DATE would be if you want all December records across several years, for instance.

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This may be related to the problem that archivists have with common date datatypes. Often, you want to be able to encode just the year, or just the year and the month, depending on what information is available, but you want to be able to encode this information in just one datatype. This is a problem which doesn't apply in very many other situations. (In answer to this question in the past, I've had techie types dismiss it as a problem with the data: your data is faulty!)

e.g., in a composer catalogue you are recording the fact that the composer dated a manuscript "January 1951". What can you put in a MySQL DATE field to represent this? "1951-01"? "1951-01-00"? Neither is really valid. Normally you end up encoding years, months and days in separate fields and then having to implement the semantics at application level. This is far from ideal.

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If you're doing analytics against a fixed range of dates consider using a date dimension (fancy name for table) and use a foreign key into the date dimension. Check out this link:

http://www.ipcdesigns.com/dim_date/

If you use this date dimension consider how easily it will be to construct queries against any kind of dates you can think of.

SELECT * FROM my_table
JOIN DATE_DIM date on date.PK = my_table.date_FK
WHERE date.day = 30 AND
      date.month = 1 AND
      date.year = 2010

Or

SELECT * FROM my_table
JOIN DATE_DIM date on date.PK = my_table.date_FK
WHERE date.day_of_week = 1 AND
      date.month = 1 AND
      date.year = 2010

Or

SELECT *, date.day_of_week_name FROM my_table
JOIN DATE_DIM date on date.PK = my_table.date_FK
WHERE date.is_US_civil_holiday = 1
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