Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

How do I obtain the system include search paths of the C preprocessor? This is for a script that parses arbitrary source files and needs to know the full pathnames of the headers they #include. Let's ignore for a moment that the user can alter this sequence of search paths with compiler flags. I'd prefer a solution that uses standard tools found on POSIX systems so my script depends on next to nothing.

I tried:

cpp -v </dev/null | unusually_complex_filter

But this apparently doesn't take in account things like $C{,PLUS}_INCLUDE_PATH. To know where vector of #include <vector> is in, I suppose I must know the search paths in their precise order.

share|improve this question
    
It seems that the cpp -v </dev/null output things like "--with-gxx-include-dir=/usr/include/c++/4.4", does this help you question? – Sam Liao Oct 27 '10 at 3:24
    
This varies by language (most notably C vs C++), depending on compiler. How do you plan on dealing with projects that use a CPPFLAGS variable in a makefile? What is the purpose of your script? – Roger Pate Nov 9 '10 at 16:27

The standard headers are not required to be accessible as regular files containing standard-compliant C source. Usually, they are accessible as files but use many extensions.

Perhaps you can run the preprocessor, which is accessible in a POSIX-compliant manner as c99 -E, on the source files and use its output. POSIX does not define the exact output of the preprocessor, but it usually contains special lines that show the origin of each actual line.

share|improve this answer

with test.cpp like this:

#include <string>
#include <iostream>

int main(int, char **)
{
  return 0
}

and cpp from the gcc toolsuite you can call:

cpp test.cpp | grep '^#.*' | awk '{print $3}'

you will get

"test.cpp"
"<built-in>"
"<command-line>"
"test.cpp"
"/usr/include/c++/4.4/string"
"/usr/include/c++/4.4/string"
"/usr/include/c++/4.4/string"
"/usr/include/c++/4.4/x86_64-linux-gnu/bits/c++config.h"    
"/usr/include/c++/4.4/x86_64-linux-gnu/bits/c++config.h"
"/usr/include/c++/4.4/x86_64-linux-gnu/bits/os_defines.h"

and many more lines.

You will obviously get a lot of "duplicates", as many include files are included by other include files as well.

share|improve this answer

After some chat to get context, I think this question is just a misunderstanding of cpp for parsing different languages.

I don't know how portable -x is (or how portable -v's output format is, for that matter), though other compilers could have something very similar (I believe Intel's compiler behaves identically here, for example), but it seems you just need to tell cpp what language you're using for it to include it's language-dependent, internally-configured paths:

$ cpp --version  # my cpp is from gcc
cpp (Ubuntu 4.4.3-4ubuntu5) 4.4.3
...
$ cpp -v </dev/null 2>&1 1>/dev/null | sed -nr 's/^ ([^ ]+)$/\1/p'
/usr/local/include
/usr/lib/gcc/i486-linux-gnu/4.4.3/include
/usr/lib/gcc/i486-linux-gnu/4.4.3/include-fixed
/usr/include/i486-linux-gnu
/usr/include
$ cpp -v -x c++ </dev/null 2>&1 1>/dev/null | sed -nr 's/^ ([^ ]+)$/\1/p'
/usr/include/c++/4.4
/usr/include/c++/4.4/i486-linux-gnu
/usr/include/c++/4.4/backward
/usr/local/include
/usr/lib/gcc/i486-linux-gnu/4.4.3/include
/usr/lib/gcc/i486-linux-gnu/4.4.3/include-fixed
/usr/include/i486-linux-gnu
/usr/include

This dovetails nicely when your script takes project-specific include paths:

$ mkdir my-include  # or else cpp ignores it
$ cpp -Imy-include -v -x c++ </dev/null 2>&1 1>/dev/null | sed -nr 's/^ ([^ ]+)$/\1/p'
my-include
/usr/include/c++/4.4
/usr/include/c++/4.4/i486-linux-gnu
/usr/include/c++/4.4/backward
/usr/local/include
/usr/lib/gcc/i486-linux-gnu/4.4.3/include
/usr/lib/gcc/i486-linux-gnu/4.4.3/include-fixed
/usr/include/i486-linux-gnu
/usr/include

The returned order is the order to search, however <> includes skip the paths for "" includes (but "" includes do search <> paths). Here, cpp's output does distinguish the two sets of paths, if you need that.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.