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Any suggestions on how I might go about plotting the RGB color space as a 2-D matrix? I need a theoretical description of what's going on; a code sample or pseudocode would be helpful but is not required. Thanks!

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I'm having trouble thinking it through. I feel like I need three dimensions, one for each color channel. How do I pack it into two dimensions? Almost certainly a silly question but I'd be very thankful if someone could put me on the right track! –  Joseph Weissman Oct 17 '10 at 3:52

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you want to represent every color in RGB space in a 2D grid, it may be impossible to avoid discontinuities / sharp borders in the result. But some mapping techniques will look better than others.

Examples from Possiblywrong.wordpress.com post allRGB: Hilbert curves and random spanning trees:

  • Traverse the pixels of the image via a 2-dimensional (order 12) Hilbert curve, while at the same time traversing the RGB color cube via a 3-dimensional (order 8) Hilbert curve, assigning each pixel in turn the corresponding color hilbert RGB 3D->2D

  • "Breadth-first traversal of random spanning tree of pixels, assigning colors in Hilbert curve order." Breadth-first traversal of random spanning tree of pixels, assigning colors in Hilbert curve order.

Also check out allrgb.com, "The objective of allRGB is simple: To create images with one pixel for every RGB color (16777216); not one color missing, and not one color twice."

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Also check out the 40 unique submissions (w/ source code!) at the "Images with All Colors" challenge on Stack Exchange's very own Programming Puzzles & Code Golf –  Mac Cowell Sep 10 at 4:40

If you don't want to lose any information, you will need to use three dimension. If you can lose some dimensional information, then it's easy. Just do this:

// or HSV
int [256*256][256] colorMatrix;
for (int r = 0; r < 256; r++) {
    for (int r = 0; r < 256; r++) {
        for (int r = 0; r < 256; r++) {
            colorMatrix[256*r+g][b] = color(r, g, b);
        }
    }
}
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So it IS too much information to pack into two dimensions. Any reason we chose blue to represent 'more fully'? Does the human visual system process blue any differently? Just curious, +1 and accepted –  Joseph Weissman Oct 17 '10 at 4:18
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@Joe: no reason whatsoever. Multi-dimensional arrays is actually just syntax sugar for a 1-dimensional array accessed like such: arr[r*(256*256)+g*256+b] or arr[(r*256+g)*256+b] –  Lie Ryan Oct 17 '10 at 4:21

There isn't really a good answer for 2D, because you really need 3 dimensions. Of course, you can project a 3D space onto 2D, but to retain a meaningful amount of information you nearly need to provide the normal 3D manipulation, so you can see the projection viewed from various different angles and such.

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Probably a stupid question, but how could you see 'into' the 3-d projection? Wouldn't it be filled with solid (or muddled) colors? –  Joseph Weissman Oct 17 '10 at 4:21
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@Joe: MS Paint's color chooser is one example. You see a 2D matrix at a time (Hue and Saturation, in MS Paint), and have a scroller that selects the third dimension (the Brightness/Value, in the case of MS Paint). To see all colors at the same time though, would require a screen capable of displaying 16 777 216 pixels (for reference: 1024*768 screen displays 786 432 pixels at a time). Or you would have a semi transparent cube, which results in, as you guessed, a muddled colors. –  Lie Ryan Oct 17 '10 at 4:25
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@Joe: you don't attempt to make the 3D projection transparent to any degree. Rather, you display a 2D "slice" of the volume. –  Jerry Coffin Oct 17 '10 at 4:35
    
Yes, I get that; what would be a good strategy for taking slices of a 3-d RGB space? I'm used to the three sliders for HSV -- I guess I'm trying to understand how these slices are generated; I suppose they somehow 'rotate' the plane through the cube? OK. That actually totally makes sense -- RGB sliders would correspond to translations of the slice. But how would we make HSV sliders work, mathematically speaking? (If you're still around! Thanks for all your help.) –  Joseph Weissman Oct 17 '10 at 4:59
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HSV and HSL both define basically cone-shaped volumes. The most common display is circles along the axis of the cone. This sort of all right for selecting individual colors, but not very good for visualizing the color space as a whole. One page worth looking at: gamutvision.com/docs/gamutvision_equations.html –  Jerry Coffin Oct 17 '10 at 5:04

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