Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Why this explicit cast does throw Specified cast is not valid. exception ?

decimal d = 10m;
object o = d;
int x = (int)o;

But this works:

int x = (int)(decimal)o;
share|improve this question
    
possible duplicate of Why can't I unbox an int as a decimal? – nawfal Nov 29 '13 at 6:38
up vote 40 down vote accepted

A boxed value can only be unboxed to a variable of the exact same type. This seemingly odd restriction is a very important speed optimization that made .NET 1.x feasible before generics were available. You can read more about it in this answer.

You don't have to jump through the multiple cast hoop, simple value types implement the IConvertible interface. Which you invoke by using the Convert class:

        object o = 12m;
        int ix = Convert.ToInt32(o);
share|improve this answer
    
Very sweet! I was wrecking my head since morning on this. – RBT Apr 10 at 22:42

When you do this, you're implicitly boxing the decimal d to a basic object:

object o = d;

You cannot cast boxed values directly without first unboxing them, which is why casting directly to an int, as in the following, fails:

int x = (int)o;

However, by doing this (intermediately casting to a decimal first):

int x = (int)(decimal)o;

You're first unboxing o, which means you're retrieving the decimal value, then casting the unboxed decimal value to an int, which works because C# supports casting decimals to ints.

share|improve this answer

decimal has an explicit cast operator to int. object does not:

decimal d = 10m;
object o = d;
int x = (int)d;  // OK, calls decimal.explicit operator int(d).
int y = (int)o;  // Invalid cast.
share|improve this answer

What you need to think of here is that boxing and unboxing is not exactly a kind of conversion. You just "wrap" the object type "around" the initial decimal-type. That is why you need to unbox the object first, before you are able to convert it to an integer.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.