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Is there a way to do something like this

int a = (b == 5) ? c : d;

using Bash?

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10 Answers 10

up vote 169 down vote accepted

ternary operator ? : is just short form of if/else

case "$b" in
 5) a=$c ;;
 *) a=$d ;;
esac

Or

 [[ $b = 5 ]] && a="$c" || a="$d"
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1  
Yes, I was looking for something like this. Thanks. – En_t8 Oct 17 '10 at 15:10
41  
Note that the = operator tests for string equality, not numeric equality (i.e. [[ 05 = 5 ]] is false). If you want numeric comparison, use -eq instead. – Gordon Davisson Oct 17 '10 at 19:54
6  
It's more of a short form for if/then/else – vol7ron Apr 4 '13 at 20:10
4  
It's a genius way to utilize the short-circuit behavior to get a ternary operator effect :) :) :) – mtk May 10 '13 at 6:16
16  
The cond && op1 || op2 construct has an inherent bug: if op1 has nonzero exit status for whatever reason, the result will silently become op2. if cond; then op1; else op2; fi is one line too and doesn't have that defect. – ivan_pozdeev Aug 4 '14 at 11:56

Code:

a=$([ "$b" == 5 ] && echo "$c" || echo "$d")
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18  
this is better than the others... the point about the tertiary operator is that it's an operator, hence it's proper context is in an expression, hence it must return a value. – nic ferrier Mar 16 '12 at 7:56
    
This is the most concise way. Be aware that if the part with echo "$c" is an aliased, multi-lined command (like echo 1; echo 2), you should enclose it in parentheses. – Matt Sep 30 '13 at 18:04
1  
The order of the last 2 of the 3 ternary operands is reversed for the short-circuit trick (compared to the "True-first" convention in a = b ? c : d order). To give the OP the correct result your code should be a=$([ "$b" == 5 ] && echo "$d" || echo "$c"). – hobs Jul 3 '14 at 21:11
5  
@hobs: No that's not right. The code is correct as written. – ShreevatsaR Aug 4 '14 at 8:53

If the condition is merely checking if a variable is set, there's even a shorter form:

a=${VAR:-20}

will assign to a the value of VAR if VAR is set, otherwise it will assign it the default value 20 -- this can also be a result of an expression.

As alex notes in the comment, this approach is technically called "Parameter Expansion".

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1  
This is called "Parameter Expansion" and can/should be googled or read about, here. – alex gray Feb 14 '15 at 23:48
    
In the case of passing a string parameter with hyphens in it, I had to use quote marks: a=${1:-'my-hyphenated-text'} – saranicole Apr 26 at 16:06
(( a = b==5 ? c : d )) # string + numeric
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8  
This is good for numeric comparisons and assignments, but it will give unpredictable results if you use it for string comparisons and assignments.... (( )) treats any/all strings as 0 – Peter.O May 12 '11 at 22:51
[ $b == 5 ] && { a=$c; true; } || a=$d

This will avoid executing the part after || by accident when the code between && and || fails.

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A ; is needed following commands in {}. (Added that) – devnull Aug 1 '13 at 11:49
1  
How typical of SO. The buggy answer -- >100 votes. The nonbuggy one -- 7 now that I've upvoted it. – PSkocik Nov 26 '15 at 16:18
    
This will still not catch the error in -e mode: (set -o errexit; [ 5 == 5 ] && { false; true; echo "success"; } || echo "failure"; echo $?; echo "further on";) -> success 0 further on – ivan_pozdeev Apr 1 at 14:14
if [ "$b" -eq 5 ]; then a="$c"; else a="$d"; fi

The cond && op1 || op2 expression suggested in other answers has an inherent bug: if op1 has a nonzero exit status, op2 silently becomes the result; the error will also not be catched in -e mode.

Note the quotes. The first pair will prevent a syntax error if $b is blank or has whitespace. Others will prevent translation of all whitespace into single spaces.

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The let command supports most of the basic operators one would need:

let a=b==5?c:d;

Naturally, this works only for assigning variables; it cannot execute other commands.

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7  
it is exactly equivalent to (( ... )), so it is only valid for arithmetic expressions – drAlberT Jan 30 '13 at 12:07

Here is another option where you only have to specify the variable you're assigning once, and it doesn't matter whether what your assigning is a string or a number:

VARIABLE=`[ test ] && echo VALUE_A || echo VALUE_B`

Just a thought. :)

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(ping -c1 localhost&>/dev/null) && { echo "true"; } || {  echo "false"; }
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The following seems to work for my use cases:

Examples

$ tern 1 YES NO                                                                             
YES

$ tern 0 YES NO                                                                             
NO

$ tern 52 YES NO                                                                            
YES

$ tern 52 YES NO 52                                                                         
NO

and can be used in a script like so:

RESULT=$(tern 1 YES NO)
echo "The result is $RESULT"

tern.sh

function show_help()
{
  echo ""
  echo "usage: BOOLEAN VALUE_IF_TRUE VALUE_IF_FALSE"
  echo ""
  echo "e.g. "
  echo ""
  echo "tern 1 YES NO                            => YES"
  echo "tern 0 YES NO                            => NO"
  echo "tern "" YES NO                           => NO"
  echo "tern "ANY STRING THAT ISNT 1" YES NO     => NO"
  echo "ME=$(tern 0 YES NO)                      => ME contains NO"
  echo ""

  exit
}

if [ "$1" == "help" ]
then
  show_help
  exit
fi
if [ -z "$3" ]
then
  show_help
  exit
fi

# Set a default value for what is "false" -> 0
FALSE_VALUE=${4:-0}

function main
{
  if [ "$1" == "$FALSE_VALUE" ]; then
    echo $3
    exit;
  fi;

  echo $2
}

main "$1" "$2" "$3"
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1  
Very explanatory. Very complete. Very verbose. Three things I like. ;-) – Jesse Chisholm Mar 2 at 0:30

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