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I wish to print a Stack<Integer> object as nicely as the Eclipse debugger does, i.e., [1,2,3] etc, but printing it with out = "output:" + stack doesn't return this nice result.

Just to clarify, I'm talking about Java's built-in collection so I can't override its toString.

How can I get a nice printable version of the stack?

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9 Answers 9

up vote 134 down vote accepted

You could convert it to an array and then print that out with Arrays.toString(Object[]):

System.out.println(Arrays.toString(stack.toArray()));
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3  
I like it. Simple, clean. To be honest Collections needs a toString method too, but this works also. –  Tovi7 Aug 3 '11 at 13:43
    
@Tovi7 It probably doesn't because most OOTB Collections already provide readable toString()s, whereas arrays don't. –  Max Nanasy Jan 16 '13 at 17:56

Implement toString() on the class.

I recommend the Apache Commons ToStringBuilder to make this easier. With it, you just have to write this sort of method:

public String toString() {
     return new ToStringBuilder(this).
       append("name", name).
       append("age", age).
       toString(); 
}

In order to get this sort of output:

Person@7f54[name=Stephen,age=29]

There is also a reflective implementation.

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ToStringBuilder is usually more applicable for beans and objects that carry information, less so for complex data structures. If the stack object doesn't print all stored items, this won't help. –  Uri Dec 27 '08 at 21:30
1  
usage of reflection ToStringBuilder, HashCodeBuilder and EqualsBuilder is highly inefective. Though the output is ok, these classes are hardly the performance peak of the week... –  Jan Hruby Nov 30 '12 at 8:34
    
Also, be careful. ToStringBuilder uses threadlocal!?!? –  critium May 17 '13 at 7:20
1  
The question explicitly says the class is a built-in collection, so toString() can't be modified. –  Rasmus Kaj Oct 23 '13 at 9:30

The MapUtils class offered by the Apache Commons project offers a MapUtils.debugPrint method which will pretty print your map.

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1  
Anything similar in Guava? –  Elazar Leibovich Nov 17 '11 at 8:42
    
Not that I know of. I'm not terribly familiar with the Guava library but I wouldn't be surprised if there was. –  tlavarea Jan 18 '12 at 21:15

I agree with the above comments about overriding toString() on your own classes (and about automating that process as much as possible).

For classes you didn't define, you could write a ToStringHelper class with an overloaded method for each library class you want to have handled to your own tastes:

public class ToStringHelper {
    //... instance configuration here (e.g. punctuation, etc.)
    public toString(List m) {
        // presentation of List content to your liking
    }
    public toString(Map m) {
        // presentation of Map content to your liking
    }
    public toString(Set m) {
        // presentation of Set content to your liking
    }
    //... etc.
}

EDIT: Responding to the comment by xukxpvfzflbbld, here's a possible implementation for the cases mentioned previously.

package com.so.demos;

import java.util.List;
import java.util.Map;
import java.util.Set;

public class ToStringHelper {

    private String separator;
    private String arrow;

    public ToStringHelper(String separator, String arrow) {
        this.separator = separator;
        this.arrow = arrow;
    }

   public String toString(List<?> l) {
        StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder("(");
        String sep = "";
        for (Object object : l) {
            sb.append(sep).append(object.toString());
            sep = separator;
        }
        return sb.append(")").toString();
    }

    public String toString(Map<?,?> m) {
        StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder("[");
        String sep = "";
        for (Object object : m.keySet()) {
            sb.append(sep)
              .append(object.toString())
              .append(arrow)
              .append(m.get(object).toString());
            sep = separator;
        }
        return sb.append("]").toString();
    }

    public String toString(Set<?> s) {
        StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder("{");
        String sep = "";
        for (Object object : s) {
            sb.append(sep).append(object.toString());
            sep = separator;
        }
        return sb.append("}").toString();
    }

}

This isn't a full-blown implementation, but just a starter.

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I know that DP. But how can I easily print them in a readable format? –  Elazar Leibovich Dec 27 '08 at 21:51

System.out.println(Collection c) already print any type of collection in readable format. Only if collection contains user defined objects , then you need to implement toString() in user defined class to display content.

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Just Modified the previous example to print even collection containing user defined objects.

public class ToStringHelper {

    private  static String separator = "\n";

    public ToStringHelper(String seperator) {
        super();
        ToStringHelper.separator = seperator;

    }

    public  static String toString(List<?> l) {
        StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
        String sep = "";
        for (Object object : l) {
            String v = ToStringBuilder.reflectionToString(object);
            int start = v.indexOf("[");
            int end = v.indexOf("]");
            String st =  v.substring(start,end+1);
            sb.append(sep).append(st);
            sep = separator;
        }
        return sb.toString();
    }

    public static String toString(Map<?,?> m) {
        StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
        String sep = "";
        for (Object object : m.keySet()) {
            String v = ToStringBuilder.reflectionToString(m.get(object));
            int start = v.indexOf("[");
            int end = v.indexOf("]");
            String st =  v.substring(start,end+1);
            sb.append(sep).append(st);
            sep = separator;
        }
        return sb.toString();
    }

    public static String toString(Set<?> s) {
        StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
        String sep = "";
        for (Object object : s) {
            String v = ToStringBuilder.reflectionToString(object);
            int start = v.indexOf("[");
            int end = v.indexOf("]");
            String st =  v.substring(start,end+1);
            sb.append(sep).append(st);
            sep = separator;
        }
        return sb.toString();
    }

    public static void print(List<?> l) {
        System.out.println(toString(l));    
    }
    public static void print(Map<?,?> m) {
        System.out.println(toString(m));    
    }
    public static void print(Set<?> s) {
        System.out.println(toString(s));    
    }

}
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line 21: ToStringBuilder cannot be resolved –  Tony Aug 29 '13 at 19:19

If this is your own collection class rather than a built in one, you need to override its toString method. Eclipse calls that function for any objects for which it does not have a hard-wired formatting.

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And how does eclipse format those classes w/ hard-wired formatting? That's what I'm looking for. –  Elazar Leibovich Dec 27 '08 at 21:52

Be careful when calling Sop on Collection, it can throw ConcurrentModification Exception. Because internally toString method of each Collection internally calls Iterator over the Collection.

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Should work for any collection except Map, but it's easy to support, too. Modify code to pass these 3 chars as arguments if needed.

static <T> String seqToString(Iterable<T> items) {
    StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
    sb.append('[');
    boolean needSeparator = false;
    for (T x : items) {
        if (needSeparator)
            sb.append(' ');
        sb.append(x.toString());
        needSeparator = true;
    }
    sb.append(']');
    return sb.toString();
}
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