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I allocate objects on the heap and under some circumstances I combine them into a new object (my Foo class mainly contains 2-3 STL containers). (An alternative would be to use copies, but I guess that would be less efficient.)

These operations may fail, thus exceptions may be thrown. Unless I release the dynamic memory whenever I throw an exception, I will have memory leaks.

Would auto_ptr/unique_ptr make sense in this case? I guess so since Combine is a "sink", but what if I wanted to use f1 and f2 after the call to Combine?

Thanks!

Here's my code:

Foo* MakeFoo( )
{
    Foo* foo = 0;

    Foo* f1 = SimpleFoo( );
    if( f1 )
    {
        Foo* f2 = SimpleFoo( );
        if( f2 )
        {
            Foo* combined = Combine( f1, f2 );
            delete f2;
            delete f1;
        }
        else
            foo = f1;
    }
    delete foo;
}

Foo* SimpleFoo( )
{
    Foo* f = 0;

    if( something )
    {
        f = new Foo;
        if( somethingElse )
            throw std::runtime_error( "Error" ); // Memory leak
    }

    return f;
}

Foo* Combine( const Foo* f1, const Foo* f2 )
{
    assert( f1 );
    assert( f2 );

    // Memory leak in MakeFoo( )
    if( something )
        throw std::runtime_error( "Error" );

    Foo* foo = new Foo;

    // Maybe one could also simply modify f1
    foo->Add( *f1 );
    foo->Add( *f2 );

    return foo;
}
share|improve this question
    
Could you tidy your code up a bit? What are something and somethingElse? Where are you catching the exceptions? – Oliver Charlesworth Oct 17 '10 at 16:49
    
something and somethingElse are just some conditions (the code is part of a very simple recursive-descent parser), the exceptions are caught in main. – Andreas Oct 17 '10 at 16:56
up vote 1 down vote accepted

This answer is going to assume that you meant return foo at the end of MakeFoo(). My first choice would be to refactor so as to not use so much dynamic allocation, along the lines of this:

Foo *MakeFoo(){
  if(!something)
    return 0;

  return Combine(SimpleFoo(), SimpleFoo());
}

Foo SimpleFoo(){
  Foo foo;
  if (something2) // hopefully related to foo. Otherwise, put this condition in MakeFoo
    throw std::runtime_error("Error");

  return foo;
}

Foo *Combine(const Foo &f1, const Foo &f2){
  if (something3)
    throw std::runtime_error("Error");

  Foo *combination = new Foo;
  combination->add(f1);
  combination->add(f2);

  return combination;
}

If that's not an option for you, I would write something like this in '03:

Foo *MakeFoo(){
  auto_ptr<Foo> f1 (SimpleFoo());
  if (!f1.get())
    return 0;

  auto_ptr<Foo> f2> (SimpleFoo());
  if (!f2.get())
    return f1.release();

  Foo *combined = Combine(f1.get(), f2.get());
  f1.release();
  f2.release();
  return combined;
}

Foo *SimpleFoo(){
  if (!something)
    return 0;

  auto_ptr<Foo> f (new Foo);
  if (somethingHopefullyRelatedToF)
    throw std::runtime_error("Error");

  return f.release();
}

unique_ptr can be used identically. shared_ptr is also a very wide hammer that would nevertheless work for this problem. I'm sure the above examples aren't exact fits for you situation, but hopefully they give you ideas that are applicable to your problem.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, this looks very good! – Andreas Oct 17 '10 at 17:57

unique_ptr could help here with memory management, but unless you have move support built into your container in Foo::Add you'll want to use a shared_ptr instead because you can't copy the contents of a unique_ptr only move ownership of it.

If your stl has unique_ptr and shared_ptr you probably shouldn't use auto_ptr.

a typedef of shared_ptr will clean up the code some as well.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, shared_ptr sounds like a good idea. – Andreas Oct 17 '10 at 17:14
    
Btw, what about the performance? – Andreas Oct 17 '10 at 17:21
    
shared_ptr sounds a lot more flexible than auto_ptr, it seems tempting to always use it... What are the disadvantages? – Andreas Oct 17 '10 at 17:22
    
@Andreas: Performance shouldn't be your primary concern. It should be a clean, working program. Most of the time this also makes performance good as well. Once your program is done, you can profile it and find out what needs to be sped up. The thing about shared_ptr versus other pointers is that one is reference counted, and the others are not. If you need reference counting, use it; otherwise don't. Sadly, in C++03 you can't use move semantics which makes resource ownership more difficult, so you'll probably use shared_ptr more than you should only because it works better than auto_ptr. – GManNickG Oct 17 '10 at 18:58
    
I would prefer to use shared_ptr instead of auto_ptr in this case. The problem with auto_ptr is that it is fragile in the sense that it requires you to call release before the combine method. So unless you discover perf is an issue (the copying of a shared_ptr is more expensive because of the interlocked ref counting, if ref-counting is the pref bottleneck, there are other ways to handle that). – Rick Oct 18 '10 at 18:34

Yes, unique_ptr makes sense here. It handles memory management for you, a la RAII. If you want to use the two objects after the call to combine it will work as both are initialized before the call and created outside the scope of the call to Combine.

share|improve this answer
    
I doubt that. The way I've understood unique_ptr, those smart pointers are unique, i.e. Combine would receive ownership of the pointers and free the memory once it returns. – Andreas Oct 17 '10 at 16:56
    
@Andreas good point. shared_ptr would be a better option but looks like I've been beaten to the punch. – wheaties Oct 17 '10 at 20:26

Would auto_ptr/unique_ptr make sense in this case?

Yes, auto_ptr can be used. It will ensure that there will be no memory leaks.

but what if I wanted to use f1 and f2 after the call to Combine?

You can pass raw pointers to combine function. Sample code can be like below.

auto_ptr<Foo> f1 = auto_ptr<Foo>(new Foo);
auto_ptr<Foo> f2 = auto_ptr<Foo>(new Foo);
Foo* combined = Combine( f1.get(), f2.get() ); 

This way, ownership of pointers will not be transferred to combine function. So, you can use f1 and f2 after combine function also.

Also, make sure you add a catch in MakeFoo function to catch the exceptions thrown by Combine function.

share|improve this answer
    
By calling get() you are not passing ownership to combine. You should change combine to take auto pointers and pass the ownership into combine. – Loki Astari Oct 17 '10 at 17:48
    
@Martin: Thats what i meant :). As OP wants to use pointers after call to combine, i am passing raw pointers by using get(). It will not transfer ownership. If auto pointer is passed, then combine function will get the ownership, so OP can't use pointers after combine call as they will be freed inside combine. – bjskishore123 Oct 18 '10 at 3:23

I've modified Combine and chosen a combination of your anwers to solve this. The code is much shorter and easier to read, too. I'm very satisfied with this, thanks everyone!

typedef std::auto_ptr<Foo> A_Foo;

A_Foo MakeFoo( )
{
    A_Foo foo = SimpleFoo( );
    if( foo.get( ) )
    {
        A_Foo f2 = SimpleFoo( );
        if( f2.get( ) )
            Combine( *foo, *f2 );
    }
    return foo;
}

A_Foo SimpleFoo( )
{
    if( something )
    {
        A_Foo f( new Foo );
        if( somethingElse )
            throw std::runtime_error( "Error" );
        return f;
    }
    else
        return A_Foo( );
}

void Combine( Foo& f1, const Foo& f2 )
{
    if( something )
        throw std::runtime_error( "Error" );

    f1.Add( f2 );
}
share|improve this answer

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