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Just wonder how is it implemented actually across different compilers and debug/release configurations. Does standard somehow provides recommendations on its implementation? Does it differ anywhere?

I tried to run a simple program where i have been returning non-const references and pointers to local variables from functions but it worked out the same way. So is it true that reference internally is just a pointer?

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Totally implementation-defined. The standard says whether a reference uses storage or not is unspecified. Likely, a pointer is easiest, but many times references can be removed altogether. –  GManNickG Oct 17 '10 at 19:04

4 Answers 4

up vote 9 down vote accepted

The natural implementation of a reference is indeed a pointer. However, do not depend on this in your code.

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Of course, no way for this to happen. –  Keynslug Oct 17 '10 at 19:10
    
@Martin York, one could depend on sizeof(T*)==sizeof(T&) –  Peter G. Oct 17 '10 at 22:45
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@Peter G: That will not work as you expect. As references are aliases the RHS is actually getting the size of T (as a T& is an alias to a T). Thus it only holds when sizeof(T) == sizeof(void*). Try printing the sizeof(char&) it will return 1. Aliases do not introduce a new variable they introduce a new name for a variable (so they may not even need pointers to be implemented (if the variable and the reference are in the same scope). –  Loki Astari Oct 18 '10 at 0:04
    
Missed a not from original comment: -> As you can't do anything with a reference knowing its implementation will not hurt. You can NOT get the address of a reference you can NOT modify the reference itself (only what it refers to). There is no way to interact with a reference. –  Loki Astari Oct 18 '10 at 0:08
3  
There is no standard-conforming way to directly depend on it. That is clear also to me. What I meant so say in my above comment was that the size of the storage of references is observable and has an effect. When you have a struct containing a reference member a and another struct that has a pointer member a instead and no padding or alignment issues the size of the struct will change if references had a different size. ... –  Peter G. Oct 18 '10 at 6:41

Just to repeat some of the stuff everyone's been saying, lets look at some compiler output:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int byref(int & foo)
{
  printf("%d\n", foo);
}
int byptr(int * foo)
{
  printf("%d\n", *foo);
}

int main(int argc, char **argv) {
  int aFoo = 5; 
  byref(aFoo);
  byptr(&aFoo);
}

We can compile this with LLVM (with optimizations turned off) and we get the following:

define i32 @_Z5byrefRi(i32* %foo) {
entry:
  %foo_addr = alloca i32*                         ; <i32**> [#uses=2]
  %retval = alloca i32                            ; <i32*> [#uses=1]
  %"alloca point" = bitcast i32 0 to i32          ; <i32> [#uses=0]
  store i32* %foo, i32** %foo_addr
  %0 = load i32** %foo_addr, align 8              ; <i32*> [#uses=1]
  %1 = load i32* %0, align 4                      ; <i32> [#uses=1]
  %2 = call i32 (i8*, ...)* @printf(i8* noalias getelementptr inbounds ([4 x i8]* @.str, i64 0, i64 0), i32 %1) ; <i32> [#uses=0]
  br label %return

return:                                           ; preds = %entry
  %retval1 = load i32* %retval                    ; <i32> [#uses=1]
  ret i32 %retval1
}

define i32 @_Z5byptrPi(i32* %foo) {
entry:
  %foo_addr = alloca i32*                         ; <i32**> [#uses=2]
  %retval = alloca i32                            ; <i32*> [#uses=1]
  %"alloca point" = bitcast i32 0 to i32          ; <i32> [#uses=0]
  store i32* %foo, i32** %foo_addr
  %0 = load i32** %foo_addr, align 8              ; <i32*> [#uses=1]
  %1 = load i32* %0, align 4                      ; <i32> [#uses=1]
  %2 = call i32 (i8*, ...)* @printf(i8* noalias getelementptr inbounds ([4 x i8]* @.str, i64 0, i64 0), i32 %1) ; <i32> [#uses=0]
  br label %return

return:                                           ; preds = %entry
  %retval1 = load i32* %retval                    ; <i32> [#uses=1]
  ret i32 %retval1
}

The bodies of both functions are identical

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Nice job TokenMacGuy! –  Viktor Sehr Sep 16 '13 at 15:08

I can't say this is right for sure, but I did some Googling and found this statement:

The language standard does not require any particular mechanism. Each implementation is free to do it in any way, as long as the behavior is compliant.

Source: Bytes.com

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Reference is not pointer. This is fact. Pointer can bind to another object, has its own operations like dereferencing and incrementing / decrementing.

Although internally, reference may be implemented as a pointer. But this is an implementation detail which does not change the fact that references cannot be interchanged with pointers. And one cannot write code assuming references are implemented as pointers.

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