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list.loadRequestParms(request, 'a', 20);

This method takes three parameters

  1. a request object.
  2. a char
  3. an integer

Now how to define these as constants somewhere and use it in this method.

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It really looks like a homework, and I didn't understand what your want to do. –  Colin Hebert Oct 17 '10 at 19:11
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possible duplicate of What is the best way to implement constants in Java ? –  Colin Hebert Oct 17 '10 at 19:21
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3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I think I understand what you mean, but more detail would have been useful.

static final Request MY_REQUEST_CONST = someRequest;
static final char MY_A_CONST = 'a';
static final int MY_INT_CONST = 20;

list.loadRequestParms(MY_REQUEST_CONST, MY_A_CONST, MY_INT_CONST);

Some things to note. A constant in Java is created by the final static keywords. Convention suggests that constant variable names are uppercase.

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why did u declare as static and final... –  John Oct 17 '10 at 19:17
    
static and final is what makes a constant in Java. Static means that it is shared by all instances of the Object, rather than creating a new copy for each instance (which is pointless if it is constant), and final means it cannot change (which is required for a constant). –  Codemwnci Oct 17 '10 at 19:19
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How to define constants in Java - tutorial.

Passing parameters in Java - an article.

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Constants? You mean variables that don't change and are final? Same copy of which lasts all throughout, i.e. are static? And they can also be publicly accessible.

http://www.devx.com/tips/Tip/12829

public class MaxUnits {
   public static final int MAX_UNITS = 25;
}
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