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What is overhead? Are there multiple types of overhead, or only one? What are some examples?

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closed as not a real question by Goz, 0xA3, Paul R, Oded, starblue Oct 17 '10 at 19:57

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3  
Google Define Overhead: google.com/… –  André Pena Oct 17 '10 at 19:40
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4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The business meaning of overhead cost explains it best. From Wikipedia:

The term overhead is usually used to group expenses that are necessary to the continued functioning of the business, but cannot be immediately associated with the products/services being offered1 (e.g. do not directly generate profits).

Overhead is a "cost" you will incur to be able to perform an operation; you need to "invest" some resource to perform the operation in question.

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Overhead is any usage of a particular resource that's a side-effect of what you're actually trying to achieve. e.g. Struct padding is a form of memory overhead. Pushing and popping arguments on the stack is a form of processing overhead. Packet headers are a form of bandwidth overhead. Think of a resource, it can have an overhead associated with it.

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i wouldn't say "undesired" but more like "side-effect". –  tenfour Oct 17 '10 at 19:40
    
@tenfour: Yes, that's much better. I've worked that into my answer. –  Oli Charlesworth Oct 17 '10 at 19:44
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Here's an example of size overhead for structs and classes:

struct first {
    char letter1;
    int number;
    char letter2;
};

struct second {
    int number;
    char letter1;
    char letter2;
};

int main ()
{
    cout << "Size of first: " << sizeof(first) << endl;
    cout << "Size of second: " << sizeof(second) << endl;
    return 0;
}

The result is:

Size of first: 12
Size of second: 8

The compiler must build a struct to be word-aligned. In the first struct, the surrounding char's (one byte each) cause the compiler to "push" the int down so that it can be accessed as a full word (four bytes). The second struct doesn't require nearly as much pushing.

Moral of the story: place similar-size data members next to each other.

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Here's an example of time overhead, related to better use of locality to exploit the cache:

#include <stdio.h>

#define SIZE 1024

double A[SIZE][SIZE], B[SIZE][SIZE], C[SIZE][SIZE];

int main ()
{
    int i, j, k;

    for (i = 0; i < SIZE; i++) {
        for (j = 0; j < SIZE; j++) {
            for (k = 0; k < SIZE; k++) {
                C[i][j] += A[i][k] * B[k][j];
            }
        }
    }

    return 0;
}

Running this on my machine takes this much time:

real    0m35.137s
user    0m34.996s
sys     0m0.067s

Now I'll swap the j and k loop iterations:

#include <stdio.h>

#define SIZE 1024

double A[SIZE][SIZE], B[SIZE][SIZE], C[SIZE][SIZE];

int main ()
{
    int i, j, k;

    for (i = 0; i < SIZE; i++) {
        for (k = 0; k < SIZE; k++) {            // this is the only change
            for (j = 0; j < SIZE; j++) {
                C[i][j] += A[i][k] * B[k][j];
            }
        }
   }

   return 0;
}

The runtime for this is:

real    0m5.489s
user    0m5.436s
sys     0m0.040s

It's much faster because the loop iterations are more in-line with the order of the array indices. Thus, the data is more likely to be accessed consecutively, and thus more likely to be available in cache.

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