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The following is pseudocode:

myGoto:
try
{
   // do some db updating
   myDB.doOptimisticConcurrency();

} catch (MyConcExeption ex) {

   if (tried < fiveTimes) {
       myDB.Refresh();
       tried++;
       goto myGoto;
   }

}

I have several try-catch blocks in one method, and I don't want to reinvoke my method from the beginning for every thrown exception. Is using goto acceptable in this situation?

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1  
Aw. It hurts trying to understand that. –  xtofl Oct 17 '10 at 20:08
    
On Error Resume Next –  Filip Ekberg Oct 17 '10 at 20:39
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6 Answers 6

up vote 16 down vote accepted

You can change it to:

while (tried < fiveTimes)
try
{
   // do some db updating
   myDB.doOptimisticConcurrency();
   break;
}
catch (MyConcExeption ex)
{
   tried++;
   myDB.Refresh();
}
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1  
Note that at the end of this loop, you would have to then test tried again to know whether or not it succeeded. I'd generally prefer an exception after the retries had all failed. –  Jon Skeet Oct 17 '10 at 20:24
1  
@Jon - That's true for the code in the question too, I just showed how to write it without goto. –  Giorgi Oct 17 '10 at 20:28
    
Granted, but I think it's worth pointing it out as a flaw in the original code to. I suspect it's very rare that you actually want to continue as if nothing's gone wrong after several retries. –  Jon Skeet Oct 17 '10 at 20:41
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I wouldn't use "goto" - but you might want to write a little helper method. For example:

public static void TryMultiple<E>(Action action, int times) where E : Exception
{
    E lastException = null;
    for (int i = 0; i < times; i++)
    {
        try
        {
            action();
            return; // Yay, success!
        }
        catch (E exception)
        {
            // Possibly log?
            lastException = exception;
        }
    }
    throw new RetryFailedException("Retry failed " + times + " times",
                                   lastException);
}

That's just a sketch of the solution - you'll want to adapt it accordingly. Anyway, this basically lets you perform retries in the face of a semi-accepted exception in a reusable manner. You'll probably use a lambda expression to express the action, or sometimes just a method group for a single method call:

TryMultiple<MyConcurrencyException>(myDB.doOptimisticConcurrency, 5);
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You could just use a loop.

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Using goto is almost never acceptable, it leads to spaghetti code and get your code less readable.

In your case a simple loop would make your code more readable.

alt text

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5  
Wrong. GOTO's can improve your code if used wisely. For example, in C it can be useful for wrapping error handling code in on e place if many calls in a function may fail. That said, I have never found the need to use it in C#, and I don't like the OP's example. Absolutes are rarely correct though. –  Ed S. Oct 17 '10 at 20:04
    
@Ed Swangren, I tempered my statement ;) –  Colin Hebert Oct 17 '10 at 20:06
1  
Ok, now I agree. Removed my downvote :) –  Ed S. Oct 17 '10 at 20:07
    
+1 for the answer and referencing xkcd :-) –  WestDiscGolf Oct 17 '10 at 20:09
1  
I hope you don't miss that the point of the xkcd comic is that it is not the end of the world to use goto ... –  SoftMemes Oct 17 '10 at 20:10
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You shouldn't be throwing an exception if the situation is not, well, exceptional. Why don't you add a retry argument to that method and throw the exception internally only if the retry count is exceeded?

EDIT: Like others have suggested, a loop is a better alternative as well. However, that looks like your method, not a method wrapped in some library that you can't modify. If I am correct, I would still go with the retry parameter and only throw an exception if all retries fail. If you expect that this method will sometimes fail on the first attempt that should not be an exception.

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This is much better:

private void MyMethod()
{
   MyMethod(5);
}    

private void MyMethod(int triesLeft)
{
   if(triesLeft == 0)
      return;  // or throw

   try
   {
      // do some db updating
      myDB.doOptimisticConcurrency();
   }       
   catch (MyConcExeption ex) 
   {
       myDB.Refresh(); 
       MyMethod(triesLeft - 1);
   }
}
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4  
It's a loop! Why bring recursion into it? –  SoftMemes Oct 17 '10 at 20:08
    
Loops and recursion are equivalent. –  Ani Oct 17 '10 at 20:10
    
yeah... let's not write Lisp in C# if we can avoid it by using a simple loop please. –  Ed S. Oct 17 '10 at 20:11
1  
@Ed Swangren: Don't you think it's a little dogmatic to equate recursion with Lisp and loops with C#? It's about the task at hand, and in this case, I find both methods to be acceptable. –  Ani Oct 17 '10 at 20:19
1  
@Ani - loops are definitely not always easier to read than recursion, traversing a binary tree is one example that looks much better with recursion than without in any language. In this case however, all you need to do is to do something n times, which is very well expressed using a loop, and not so well using recursion (in C#). –  SoftMemes Oct 17 '10 at 20:20
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