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I'm getting exactly what I want when I do this console.dir(this) in Chrome.
Is there a way to get that into an array some how?

So I've tried to do something like this to get started:

for(var o in console.dir(this)) {
     console.log(o);
}

All I get is "undefined" and it prints the list into the console again.

I really just need a name list of all Native Javascript Objects and their respective methods and attributes without the hassle of manually creating and maintaining a monstrous list. Ideally the solution would be a dynamically created array of everything; either flat or multidimensional array so I can iterate through it.

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up vote 5 down vote accepted

You're making it too hard: it's already in a dictionary, because everything in Javascript is already a dictionary.

Just open the javascript console and type this, and you get an object that expands to

> this
DOMWindow
Infinity: Infinity
Array: function Array() { [native code] }
Attr: function Attr() { [native code] }
Audio: [object Function]
BeforeLoadEvent: function BeforeLoadEvent() { [native code] }
Blob: function Blob() { [native code] }
BlobBuilder: function BlobBuilder() { [native code] }
Boolean: function Boolean() { [native code] }
CDATASection: function CDATASection() { [native code] }
CSSCharsetRule: function CSSCharsetRule() { [native code] }

(truncated because you can see it yourself.) If you want a particular element of it, just address it: it's a DOMWindow object, it has an element Array, which has an element prototype, which contains all the method functions.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks, i guess im just being lazy – user478860 Oct 18 '10 at 1:08
    
Nah, just the opposite -- as I say, you're making it too hard. The thing you're presented with is already an array. – Charlie Martin Oct 18 '10 at 1:12

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