Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've got a problem , and do not know how to code in python.

I've got a list[10, 10, 10, 20, 20, 20, 30]

I want it be in a dictionary like this

{"10": 1, "20":  3, "30" : 1}

How could I achieve this?

share|improve this question
4  
If you are counting the number of items in that list, wouldn't it be {"10": 3, "20":3, "30":1}? If not, how is this dictionary compiled? What are the values in relation to their keys? –  Anthony Forloney Oct 18 '10 at 2:12
1  
possible duplicate of How to get item count from list in python? –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Oct 18 '10 at 2:12
    
defaultdict solves all problems –  nearlymonolith Oct 18 '10 at 2:24

4 Answers 4

up vote 14 down vote accepted
from collections import Counter
a = [10, 10, 10, 20, 20, 20, 30]
c = Counter(a)
# Counter({10: 3, 20: 3, 30: 1})

If you really want to convert the keys to strings, that's a separate step:

dict((str(k), v) for k, v in c.iteritems())

This class is new to Python 2.7; for earlier versions, use this implementation:

http://code.activestate.com/recipes/576611/


Edit: Dropping this here since SO won't let me paste code into comments,

from collections import defaultdict
def count(it):
    d = defaultdict(int)
    for j in it:
        d[j] += 1
    return d
share|improve this answer

Another way that does not use set or Counter:

d = {}
x = [10, 10, 10, 20, 20, 20, 30]
for j in x:
    d[j] = d.get(j,0) + 1

EDIT: For a list of size 1000000 with 100 unique items, this method runs on my laptop in 0.37 sec, while the answer using set takes 2.59 sec. For only 10 unique items, the former method takes 0.36 sec, while the latter method only takes 0.25 sec.

EDIT: The method using defaultdict takes 0.18 sec on my laptop.

share|improve this answer
    
If this is a performance race, check the defaultdict version I put in my answer (blame SO for not letting me paste it here), which is about twice as fast. –  Glenn Maynard Oct 18 '10 at 5:13
    
Thanks for the comment. You are exactly right: your method ran in 0.18 sec on my laptop. –  Steve Tjoa Oct 18 '10 at 5:22

Like this

l = [10, 10, 10, 20, 20, 20, 30]
uniqes = set(l)
answer = {}
for i in uniques:
    answer[i] = l.count(i)

answer is now the dictionary that you want

Hope this helps

share|improve this answer

in Python >= 2.7 you can use dict comprehensions, like:

>>> l = [10, 10, 10, 20, 20, 20, 30]
>>> {x: l.count(x) for x in l}
{10: 3, 20: 3, 30: 1}

not the fastest way, but pretty suitable for small lists

UPDATE

or, inspired by inspectorG4dget, this is better:

{x: l.count(x) for x in set(l)}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.