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I recently shifted from JAVA development environment to .net development environment. I am developing web application using .net MVC framework. Would someone help me to find the meaning of following code segment. It seams like iterating thought list, but I could not find specific definition of this code sample:

SmartTextBoxModel smartTextBoxModel = new SmartTextBoxModel();
List<string> nameList = new List<string>() { "AA", "AB", "AC", "BB", "B" };
var filteredStringList = 
  from n in nameList
  where n.IndexOf(name, 0, StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase) != -1
  select n;

The SmartTextBoxModel class has following code (it basically contains list object and getters and setters).

public class SmartTextBoxModel
{
    public SmartTextBoxModel()
    {
        this.NameList = new List<SelectListItem>();
    }

    public List<SelectListItem> NameList { get;private set; }

    public string Name { get;  set; }
}

My Question is what does this line mean:

var filteredStringList = 
  from n in nameList
  where n.IndexOf(name, 0, StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase) != -1
  select n;
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@Joel sorry I think my edit is better :) –  Earlz Oct 18 '10 at 4:09
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5 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

That line is selecting all instances n in nameList where the string n contains the string name. So your result will be any of the strings in nameList that have the string name in it.

Also, it is important to break it up into the two parts. First, this is a Linq query. You could do this to find all the items in nameList that equal name exactly: var filteredStringList = from n in nameList where n == name select n;

Your where statement "n.IndexOf(name, 0, StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase) != -1" just changes the simpler query, "n == name" to filter in a slightly different way. First, the n.IndexOf(name) method gets the first starting index where the string name occurs in n. Any value >= 0 means that name exists in the string. -1 is returned if the string doesnt exist. The other arguments are the index where to start the search, in your case 0, and the string comparison, in your case StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase. StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase tells the string comparison to treat A and a as the same and so on.

Edit: @Jason had a good point to consider also. While strictly speaking the query is not actually doing the iteration, it is actually creating a linq expression. The expression will execute only after you call something like filteredStringList.ToList() or a similar call. For all intents and purposes, the result is the same, but it is important to know when the query will actually execute. See this post for more details: http://blogs.msdn.com/b/charlie/archive/2007/12/09/deferred-execution.aspx?wa=wsignin1.0

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"So your result will be any of the strings in nameList that have the string name in it." Nope. That is not what filteredStringList is. –  Jason Oct 18 '10 at 5:44
    
How so? Please explain. –  Nathan Totten Oct 18 '10 at 13:42
    
Because of deferred execution. –  Jason Oct 18 '10 at 13:53
    
Ah, yeah. Good point. –  Nathan Totten Oct 18 '10 at 15:24
    
I'm glad you edited your answer to clarify, and your edit is mostly right but this statement is inaccurate: " For all intents and purposes, the result is the same" They are very different. –  Jason Oct 18 '10 at 15:31
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var filteredStringList = 
    from n in nameList
    where n.IndexOf(name, 0, StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase) != -1
    select n;

This is LINQ (specifically the query syntax form), and exactly what is happening is a little complicated and subtle.

The rough idea is that this block of code creates an iterator. When this iterator is iterated over, it will filter nameList by only selecting the elements of nameList that satisfy the predicate p(n) = n.IndexOf(name, 0, StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase) != -1. That is, it will only select the elements of nameList that contain name (ignoring case).

It is very important that you understand that filteredStringList is not a list (thus, it is horribly named). It does not contain the results of the filtering. It only creates an object that captures the rules for building the filtered subsequence of nameList when it is iterated over.

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"get all entries of nameList which contain name"

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It's saying if a variable called name exists in nameList then select it into filteredStringList.

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Your LINQ can be interpreted as

    for (int i = 0; i < nameList.Count; i++)
        {
          if (nameList[i].IndexOf(name, 0, StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase) != -1) 
            {
                TempList.Add(nameList[i]);
            }

        }

here TempList is List<String> TempList = new List<string>();

In LAMBDA Expression you can write this as

var filteredStringList = nameList.Where(X => X.IndexOf(name, 0, StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase) != -1);
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No. It can not be interpreted as that. The OP's block of code and your block of code have different semantics (lazy evaluation being a major component of the reasoning behind this). –  Jason Oct 18 '10 at 5:36
    
@Janson: Thank you.... Edited in. –  Thorin Oakenshield Oct 18 '10 at 5:44
    
No, it's still not right. –  Jason Oct 18 '10 at 5:49
    
@Jason: I can not understant whats the problem in my answer. can you please explain that –  Thorin Oakenshield Oct 18 '10 at 5:52
    
your code loops through the list and builds another. It runs in O(N) time and uses O(N) space. The OP's code creates an enumerator. Period. Just that. Nothing else. O(1) time, O(1) space. The linq query and the for-loop don't do the same thing. Example: var filteredStringList =...; nameList.Clear(); Console.WriteLine(filteredStringList.Count()); outputs 0. // your cycle; nameList.Clear(); Console.WriteLine(TempList.Count()); outputs the original size of nameList (5). –  R. Martinho Fernandes Nov 16 '10 at 11:39
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