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I have a linux system at my workplace with pretty old packages and no root access. I'm compiling packages that I need from source with --prefix=[somewhere in homedir]. My problem is that I just can't find out how to convince configure to look for header files in a specific directory. The source is cpp. I tried with environment variables related to g++ and looking up flags and googling but I had no success. Can someone help me solve this?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 9 down vote accepted

The normal way to do this is --with-<feature>=<header directory>.

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Thanks. It worked. –  jakab922 Oct 18 '10 at 12:12
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If it worked then don't leave us hanging here... –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Oct 18 '10 at 12:28

Usually you can pass additional compiler flags inside CXXFLAGS. For gcc you can specify more include directories with -I/some/dir, e.g.

$ ./configure CXXFLAGS="-I/some/dir/"

where /some/dir/ contains your headers.

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CXXFLAGS is for C++ compiler, so CFLAGS for C compiler. –  thor Jun 15 '11 at 7:34
CPPFLAGS = C Preprocessor Flags, these flags will be used for C and C++ compilation.

CFLAGS = C Flags, these flags will be used when compiling C.

CXXFLAGS = C++ Flags, these flags will be used when compiling C++.

The -I flag specifies an additional include directory to be used during compilation.

Generally it's a good idea to use CPPFLAGS when specifying include directories, that way you know it will be used even if the project has some source that is compiled as C.

Of course, there might also be circumstances where you only want the include directory to be used by C or C++, but not both. In which case you would obviously be better served by using CFLAGS or CXXFLAGS instead.

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It's better to use CPPFLAGS to specify include directories.

./configure CPPFLAGS="-I/your/whatever/includedir"
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While relevant, this response doesn't state why this might work where specifying the same directory in the environment before running configure will fail. –  eh9 Nov 8 '12 at 20:39

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