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How to remove duplicate white spaces (including tabs, newlines, spaces, etc...) in a string using Java?

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6 Answers

up vote 174 down vote accepted

Like this:

yourString = yourString.replaceAll("\\s+", " ");

For example

System.out.println("lorem  ipsum   dolor \n sit.".replaceAll("\\s+", " "));

outputs

lorem ipsum dolor sit.

What does that \s+ mean?

\s+ is a regular expression. \s matches a space, tab, new line, carriage return, form feed or vertical tab, and + says "one or more of those". Thus the above code will collapse all "whitespace substrings" longer than one character, with a single space character.

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why there is no replaceAll method ?? Does latest JDK support this method??? –  Suhrob Samiev Dec 20 '11 at 5:25
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@SuhrobSamiev -- String.replaceAll() has been in Java since JDK 1.4. docs.oracle.com/javase/1.4.2/docs/api/java/lang/…, java.lang.String) –  David Moles Dec 22 '11 at 19:25
2  
I wish I could add more than +1 for the awesome explanation of \s+. –  Cyntech Jun 1 '12 at 12:56
    
I understood \s+ but what does 2 backslash \\ mean ? –  saplingPro Aug 23 '12 at 11:28
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The string literal "\\" represents the string consisting of a single backslash. So to represent \s+ you write "\\s+". –  aioobe Aug 23 '12 at 11:51
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You can use the regex

(\s)\1

and

replace it with $1.

Java code:

str = str.replaceAll("(\\s)\\1","$1");

If the input is "foo\t\tbar " you'll get "foo\tbar " as output
But if the input is "foo\t bar" it will remain unchanged because it does not have any consecutive whitespace characters.

If you treat all the whitespace characters(space, vertical tab, horizontal tab, carriage return, form feed, new line) as space then you can use the following regex to replace any number of consecutive white space with a single space:

str = str.replaceAll("\\s+"," ");

But if you want to replace two consecutive white space with a single space you should do:

str = str.replaceAll("\\s{2}"," ");
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awesome explanation !! –  rammayur Feb 6 at 13:36
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Try this - You have to import java.util.regex.*;

    Pattern pattern = Pattern.compile("\\s+");
    Matcher matcher = pattern.matcher(string);
    boolean check = matcher.find();
    String str = matcher.replaceAll(" ");

Where string is your string on which you need to remove duplicate white spaces

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If you want to get rid of all leading and trailing extraneous whitespace then you want to do something like this:

// \\A = Start of input boundary
// \\z = End of input boundary 
string = string.replaceAll("\\A\\s+(.*?)\\s+\\z", "$1");

Then you can remove the duplicates using the other strategies listed here:

string = string.replaceAll("\\s+"," ");
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hi the fastest (but not prettiest way) i found is

while (cleantext.indexOf("  ") != -1)
  cleantext = StringUtils.replace(cleantext, "  ", " ");

this is running pretty fast on android in opposite to an regex

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Works only for spaces but not other whitespaces such as tabs and newlines. –  Pang Aug 31 '13 at 6:41
    
i know, you have to add more of these while loops for other entities. But this code run much faster on android as these regex, i had to process complete ebooks. –  wutzebaer Sep 2 '13 at 9:22
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This can be possible in three steps:

  1. Convert the string in to character array (ToCharArray)
  2. Apply for loop on charater array
  3. Then apply string replace function (Replace ("sting you want to replace"," original string"));
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That's not a good solution, dropping to a char array doesn't solve anything. You're not actually explaining how to do the replace, which is the core of the problem. Also please do not post completely unrelated links. You'll get flagged as a spammer if you do so. –  Mat Aug 21 '11 at 14:13
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protected by Mat Aug 21 '11 at 14:10

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