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Looking for a really fast implementation of factorial function in JavaScript. Any suggests?

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4  
What's the possible range of arguments? –  Nikita Rybak Oct 18 '10 at 12:42
4  
Have you considered pre-calculating factorials and storing the values in a lookup table? –  Waleed Amjad Oct 18 '10 at 12:43
2  
What's the application of such a function? In other words, what are you going to use it for? –  Pointy Oct 18 '10 at 12:45
    
@Nikita Rybak, only 1 agrument (n). If (n > 170) e = Infinity –  Ken Oct 18 '10 at 13:21
    
@Sbm007, good idea. –  Ken Oct 18 '10 at 13:22
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21 Answers

up vote 38 down vote accepted

You can search for (1...100)! on WolframAlpha to pre-calculate the factorial sequence.

The first 100 numbers are:

1, 2, 6, 24, 120, 720, 5040, 40320, 362880, 3628800, 39916800, 479001600, 6227020800, 87178291200, 1307674368000, 20922789888000, 355687428096000, 6402373705728000, 121645100408832000, 2432902008176640000, 51090942171709440000, 1124000727777607680000, 25852016738884976640000, 620448401733239439360000, 15511210043330985984000000, 403291461126605635584000000, 10888869450418352160768000000, 304888344611713860501504000000, 8841761993739701954543616000000, 265252859812191058636308480000000, 8222838654177922817725562880000000, 263130836933693530167218012160000000, 8683317618811886495518194401280000000, 295232799039604140847618609643520000000, 10333147966386144929666651337523200000000, 371993326789901217467999448150835200000000, 13763753091226345046315979581580902400000000, 523022617466601111760007224100074291200000000, 20397882081197443358640281739902897356800000000, 815915283247897734345611269596115894272000000000, 33452526613163807108170062053440751665152000000000, 1405006117752879898543142606244511569936384000000000, 60415263063373835637355132068513997507264512000000000, 2658271574788448768043625811014615890319638528000000000, 119622220865480194561963161495657715064383733760000000000, 5502622159812088949850305428800254892961651752960000000000, 258623241511168180642964355153611979969197632389120000000000, 12413915592536072670862289047373375038521486354677760000000000, 608281864034267560872252163321295376887552831379210240000000000, 30414093201713378043612608166064768844377641568960512000000000000, 1551118753287382280224243016469303211063259720016986112000000000000, 80658175170943878571660636856403766975289505440883277824000000000000, 4274883284060025564298013753389399649690343788366813724672000000000000, 230843697339241380472092742683027581083278564571807941132288000000000000, 12696403353658275925965100847566516959580321051449436762275840000000000000, 710998587804863451854045647463724949736497978881168458687447040000000000000, 40526919504877216755680601905432322134980384796226602145184481280000000000000, 2350561331282878571829474910515074683828862318181142924420699914240000000000000, 138683118545689835737939019720389406345902876772687432540821294940160000000000000, 8320987112741390144276341183223364380754172606361245952449277696409600000000000000, 507580213877224798800856812176625227226004528988036003099405939480985600000000000000, 31469973260387937525653122354950764088012280797258232192163168247821107200000000000000, 1982608315404440064116146708361898137544773690227268628106279599612729753600000000000000, 126886932185884164103433389335161480802865516174545192198801894375214704230400000000000000, 8247650592082470666723170306785496252186258551345437492922123134388955774976000000000000000, 544344939077443064003729240247842752644293064388798874532860126869671081148416000000000000000, 36471110918188685288249859096605464427167635314049524593701628500267962436943872000000000000000, 2480035542436830599600990418569171581047399201355367672371710738018221445712183296000000000000000, 171122452428141311372468338881272839092270544893520369393648040923257279754140647424000000000000000, 11978571669969891796072783721689098736458938142546425857555362864628009582789845319680000000000000000, 850478588567862317521167644239926010288584608120796235886430763388588680378079017697280000000000000000, 61234458376886086861524070385274672740778091784697328983823014963978384987221689274204160000000000000000, 4470115461512684340891257138125051110076800700282905015819080092370422104067183317016903680000000000000000, 330788544151938641225953028221253782145683251820934971170611926835411235700971565459250872320000000000000000, 24809140811395398091946477116594033660926243886570122837795894512655842677572867409443815424000000000000000000, 1885494701666050254987932260861146558230394535379329335672487982961844043495537923117729972224000000000000000000, 145183092028285869634070784086308284983740379224208358846781574688061991349156420080065207861248000000000000000000, 11324281178206297831457521158732046228731749579488251990048962825668835325234200766245086213177344000000000000000000, 894618213078297528685144171539831652069808216779571907213868063227837990693501860533361810841010176000000000000000000, 71569457046263802294811533723186532165584657342365752577109445058227039255480148842668944867280814080000000000000000000, 5797126020747367985879734231578109105412357244731625958745865049716390179693892056256184534249745940480000000000000000000, 475364333701284174842138206989404946643813294067993328617160934076743994734899148613007131808479167119360000000000000000000, 39455239697206586511897471180120610571436503407643446275224357528369751562996629334879591940103770870906880000000000000000000, 3314240134565353266999387579130131288000666286242049487118846032383059131291716864129885722968716753156177920000000000000000000, 281710411438055027694947944226061159480056634330574206405101912752560026159795933451040286452340924018275123200000000000000000000, 24227095383672732381765523203441259715284870552429381750838764496720162249742450276789464634901319465571660595200000000000000000000, 2107757298379527717213600518699389595229783738061356212322972511214654115727593174080683423236414793504734471782400000000000000000000, 185482642257398439114796845645546284380220968949399346684421580986889562184028199319100141244804501828416633516851200000000000000000000, 16507955160908461081216919262453619309839666236496541854913520707833171034378509739399912570787600662729080382999756800000000000000000000, 1485715964481761497309522733620825737885569961284688766942216863704985393094065876545992131370884059645617234469978112000000000000000000000, 135200152767840296255166568759495142147586866476906677791741734597153670771559994765685283954750449427751168336768008192000000000000000000000, 12438414054641307255475324325873553077577991715875414356840239582938137710983519518443046123837041347353107486982656753664000000000000000000000, 1156772507081641574759205162306240436214753229576413535186142281213246807121467315215203289516844845303838996289387078090752000000000000000000000, 108736615665674308027365285256786601004186803580182872307497374434045199869417927630229109214583415458560865651202385340530688000000000000000000000, 10329978488239059262599702099394727095397746340117372869212250571234293987594703124871765375385424468563282236864226607350415360000000000000000000000, 991677934870949689209571401541893801158183648651267795444376054838492222809091499987689476037000748982075094738965754305639874560000000000000000000000, 96192759682482119853328425949563698712343813919172976158104477319333745612481875498805879175589072651261284189679678167647067832320000000000000000000000, 9426890448883247745626185743057242473809693764078951663494238777294707070023223798882976159207729119823605850588608460429412647567360000000000000000000000, 933262154439441526816992388562667004907159682643816214685929638952175999932299156089414639761565182862536979208272237582511852109168640000000000000000000000, 93326215443944152681699238856266700490715968264381621468592963895217599993229915608941463976156518286253697920827223758251185210916864000000000000000000000000

If you still want to calculate the values yourself, you can use memoization:

var f = [];
function factorial (n) {
  if (n == 0 || n == 1)
    return 1;
  if (f[n] > 0)
    return f[n];
  return f[n] = factorial(n-1) * n;
} ​
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15  
[] instead of new Array() –  Šime Vidas Oct 18 '10 at 13:05
4  
Drive-by downvotes are really awful. –  Pointy Oct 18 '10 at 13:35
3  
@Tim Well, it would make most sense if commenting the downvote would be an obligation. I'm not sure, why it's optional. –  Šime Vidas Oct 18 '10 at 13:37
2  
@Tadeck: Perfection is an illusion - live with it. –  Margus Mar 26 '12 at 19:41
1  
@Margus: This answer is on the opposite side, indeed ;) –  Tadeck Mar 27 '12 at 4:46
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You should use a loop.

Here are two versions benchmarked by calculating the factorial of 100 for 10.000 times.

Recursive

function rFact(num)
{
    if (num === 0)
      { return 1; }
    else
      { return num * rFact( num - 1 ); }
}

Iterative

function sFact(num)
{
    var rval=1;
    for (var i = 2; i <= num; i++)
        rval = rval * i;
    return rval;
}

Live at : http://jsfiddle.net/xMpTv/

My results show:
- Recursive ~ 150 milliseconds
- Iterative ~ 5 milliseconds..

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+1 Great answer! Although memoization may be reasonable when there are multiple calls to calculate factorials for bigger numbers. –  Tadeck Mar 19 '12 at 17:50
    
@Tadeck, thanks. Indeed memoization is very useful in this case and that is why Margus answer is picked as the correct one :) –  Gaby aka G. Petrioli Mar 19 '12 at 18:02
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I still think Margus's answer is the best one. However if you want to calculate the factorials of numbers within the range 0 to 1 (ie the gamma function) as well, then you cannot use that approach because the lookup table will have to contain infinite values.

However, you can approximate the values of the factorials, and it's pretty fast, faster than recursively calling itself or looping it at least (especially when values start to get bigger).

A good approximation method is Lanczos's one

Here is an implementation in JavaScript (ported from a calculator I wrote months ago):

function factorial(op) {
 // Lanczos Approximation of the Gamma Function
 // As described in Numerical Recipes in C (2nd ed. Cambridge University Press, 1992)
 var z = op + 1;
 var p = [1.000000000190015, 76.18009172947146, -86.50532032941677, 24.01409824083091, -1.231739572450155, 1.208650973866179E-3, -5.395239384953E-6];

 var d1 = Math.sqrt(2 * Math.PI) / z;
 var d2 = p[0];

 for (var i = 1; i <= 6; ++i)
  d2 += p[i] / (z + i);

 var d3 = Math.pow((z + 5.5), (z + 0.5));
 var d4 = Math.exp(-(z + 5.5));

 d = d1 * d2 * d3 * d4;

 return d;
}

You can now do cool stuff like factorial(0.41), etc however accuracy might be a little off, after all, it is an approximation of the result.

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quite interesting approach, thanks. –  Ken Oct 18 '10 at 20:34
    
Just saved me a ton of time, thanks very much :) –  nicolaskruchten May 26 '11 at 21:37
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Lookup table is the obvious way to go, if you're working with natural numbers. To calculate any factorial in real-time, you can speed it with a cache, saving the numbers you've calculated before. Something like:

factorial = (function() {
    var cache = {},
        fn = function(n) {
            if (n === 0) {
                return 1;
            } else if (cache[n]) {
                return cache[n];
            }
            return cache[n] = n * fn(n -1);
        };
    return fn;
}();

You can precalculate some values in order to speed it even more.

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+1 for coding style. –  Ken Oct 18 '10 at 15:19
2  
I've created an auto-memoizer for any given function based on this answer (also slightly faster :)), also including a limit on the cache size. stackoverflow.com/a/10031674/36537 –  Phil H Apr 5 '12 at 15:41
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Behold, the memoizer, which takes any single-argument function and memoizes it. Turns out to be marginally faster than @xPheRe's solution, including the limit on the size of the cache and associated checking, because I use shortcircuiting and so on.

function memoize(func, max) {
    max = max || 5000;
    return (function() {
        var cache = {};
        var remaining = max;
        function fn(n) {
            return (cache[n] || (remaining-- >0 ? (cache[n]=func(n)) : func(n)));
        }
        return fn;
    }());
}

function fact(n) {
    return n<2 ? 1: n*fact(n-1);
}

// construct memoized version
var memfact = memoize(fact,170);

// xPheRe's solution
var factorial = (function() {
    var cache = {},
        fn = function(n) {
            if (n === 0) {
                return 1;
            } else if (cache[n]) {
                return cache[n];
            }
            return cache[n] = n * fn(n -1);
        };
    return fn;
}());

Approximately 25x faster on my machine in Chrome than the recursive version, and 10% faster than xPheRe's.

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Here is my solution:

function fac(n){
    return(n<2)?1:fac(n-1)*n;
}

It's the simplest way (less characters / lines) I've found, only a function with one code line.

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The code to calculate factorial depends on your requirements.

  1. Are you concerned about overflow?
  2. What range of inputs will you have?
  3. Is it more important for you to minimize size or time?
  4. What are you going to do with the factorial?

Regarding points 1 and 4, it is often more useful to have a function to evaluate the log of the factorial directly rather than to have a function to evaluate factorial itself.

Here's a blog post that discusses these issues. Here is some C# code for computing log factorial that would be trivial to port to JavaScript. But it may not be best for your needs depending on your answers to the questions above.

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I came across this post. Inspired by all contributions here I came up with my own version, which has two features that I haven't seen discussed before: 1) A check to ensure the argument is a non-negative integer 2) Making a unit out of the cache and the function to make it one self contained bit of code. For fun, I tried to make it as compact as possible. Some may find that elegant, others may think it terribly obscure. Anyway, here it is:

var fact;
(fact = function(n){
    if ((n = parseInt(n)) < 0 || isNaN(n)) throw "Must be non-negative number";
    var cache = fact.cache, i = cache.length - 1;
    while (i < n) cache.push(cache[i++] * i);
    return cache[n];
}).cache = [1];

You can either pre fill the cache, or allow it to be filled as the calls go by. But the initial element (for fact(0) must be present or it will break.

Enjoy :)

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short and easy recursive function (you could do it with a loop, too, but i don't think that would make any difference in performance):

function factorial (n){
  if (n==0 || n==1){
    return 1;
  }
  return factorial(n-1)*n;
} 

for a very large n, you could use the stirlings approximation - but that will only give you an approximate value.

EDIT: a comment on why i'm getting a downvote for this would have been nice...

EDIT2: this would be the soulution using a loop (wich would be the better choice):

function factorial (n){
  j = 1;
  for(i=1;i<=n;i++){
    j = j*i;
  }
  return j;
}

i think the best solution would be to use the cached values, as Margus mentioned and use the stirlings approximation for larger values (assumed you have to be realy fast and don't have to be that exact on such big numbers).

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1  
In languages without tail call optimisation (i.e. most widely-used languages) it is better to use a non-recursive implementation where it is easy to do so, though there are ways around it: paulbarry.com/articles/2009/08/30/tail-call-optimization –  Daniel Earwicker Oct 18 '10 at 12:57
    
that's indeed definitely not that fastest, as it wouldn't even use TCO, if it were implemented. But it is simple and I wouldn't downvote it. It's not the fastest for sure. –  haylem Oct 18 '10 at 13:02
    
Tail call optimization isn't even possible for this function, as the recursive call is not in tail position. –  larsmans Oct 18 '10 at 13:03
1  
@Josh, (not the downvoter) fastest is the loop by quite a margin .. –  Gaby aka G. Petrioli Oct 18 '10 at 13:04
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Just for completeness, here is a recursive version that would allow tail call optimization. I'm not sure if tail call optimizations are performed in JavaScript though..

function rFact(n, acc)
{
    if (n == 0 || n == 1) return acc; 
    else return rFact(n-1, acc*n); 
}

To call it:

rFact(x, 1);
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This is an iterative solution that uses less stack space and save previously computed values in a self-memoizing way:

Math.factorial = function(n){
    if(this.factorials[n]){ // memoized
        return this.factorials[n];
    }
    var total=1;
    for(var i=n; i>0; i--){
        total*=i;
    }
    this.factorials[n] = total; // save
    return total;
};
Math.factorials={}; // store

Also note that I am adding this to the Math object which is an object literal so there is no prototype. Rather just binding these to the function directly.

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I believe the following is the most sustainable and efficient piece of code from the comments above. You can use this in your global application js architecture... and, not worry about writing it in multiple namespaces (since its a task which probably doesn't need much augmenting). I've included 2 method names (based on preference) but both can be used as they're just references.

Math.factorial = Math.fact = function(n) {
    if (isNaN(n)||n<0) return undefined;
    var f = 1; while (n > 1) {
        f *= n--;
    } return f;
};
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// if you don't want to update the Math object, use `var factorial = ...`
Math.factorial = (function() {
    var f = function(n) {
        if (n < 1) {return 1;}  // no real error checking, could add type-check
        return (f[n] > 0) ? f[n] : f[n] = n * f(n -1);
    }
    for (i = 0; i < 101; i++) {f(i);} // precalculate some values
    return f;
}());

factorial(6); // 720, initially cached
factorial[6]; // 720, same thing, slightly faster access, 
              // but fails above current cache limit of 100
factorial(100); // 9.33262154439441e+157, called, but pulled from cache
factorial(142); // 2.6953641378881614e+245, called
factorial[141]; // 1.89814375907617e+243, now cached

This does the caching of the first 100 values on the fly, and does not introduce an external variable into scope for the cache, storing the values as properties of the function object itself, which means that if you know factorial(n) has already been calculated, you can simply refer to it as factorial[n], which is slightly more efficient. Running these first 100 values will take sub-millisecond time in modern browsers.

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I figured out that after 21! the numbers are not reliable. –  AutoSponge Mar 24 '12 at 19:39
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Here is an implementation which calculates both positive and negative factorials. It's fast and simple.

var factorial = function(n) {
  return n > 1
    ? n * factorial(n - 1)
    : n < 0
        ? n * factorial(n + 1)
        : 1;
}
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Here is my code

function factorial(num){
    var result = num;
    for(i=num;i>=2;i--){
        result = result * (i-1);
    }
    return result;
}
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1  
If (n > 170) e = Infinity . And your code will generate a huge number. wont there be any overflows ? –  prime Jan 3 at 17:12
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Unsure if this question is still really current, but just in case (since I'm too interested in JavaScript, big integers, etc) :

http://www.cjandia.com/2012/05/MyJSLib/

Disclaimer: rather raw ... poor documentation (early stage, still).

Public domain, though. :)

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Here's one I made myself, don't use numbers over 170 or under 2.

function factorial(x){
 if((!(isNaN(Number(x)))) && (Number(x)<=170) && (Number(x)>=2)){
  x=Number(x);for(i=x-(1);i>=1;--i){
   x*=i;
  }
 }return x;
}
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This will return the factorial of n

function f(n){ var e = n; if (e == 1 | e == 0) return 1; while (n--){ if (n < 1) break; e*=n;} return e}

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Since a factorial is simply degenerative multiplication from the number given down to 1, it would indeed be easier to just loop through the multiplication:

Math.factorial = function(n) {

  if (n === 0||n === 1) {

    return 1;

  } else {

    for(var i = n; i > 0; --i) { //always make sure to decrement the value BEFORE it's tacked onto the original as a product
      n *= i;
    }

    return n;

  }

}
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Cached loop should be fastest (at least when called multiple times)

var factorial = (function() {
  var x =[];

  return function (num) {
    if (x[num] >0) return x[num];
    var rval=1;
    for (var i = 2; i <= num; i++) {
        rval = rval * i;
        x[i] = rval;
    }
    return rval;
  }
})();
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var factorial = (function() {
    var cache = [1];
    return function(value) {
        for (var index = cache.length; index <= value; index++) {
            cache[index] = index * cache[index - 1]
        }
        return cache[value];
    }
})();

I find this useful in same cases:

function factorialDivision(n, d) {
    var value = 1;
    for (d++ < n) {
        value *= d;
    }
    return value;
}
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