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I have the following code:

interface IConverter<T, U>
{
    U Convert(T obj);
}

interface IBusinessEntityConveter<T, U> : IConverter<T, U>
    where U : BusinessEntity
{
}

class LookupConveter<B> : IBusinessEntityConveter<Lookup, B>, IConverter<Lookup, Moniker>
    where B : BusinessEntity, new()
{

    #region IConverter<Lookup, Moniker> Members

    public Moniker Convert(Lookup obj)
    {
       //...
    }

    #endregion


    #region IConverter<Lookup,B> Members

    public B Convert(Lookup obj)
    {
       //...
    }

    #endregion
}

I am getting this error:

Error 2 'Convertors.LookupConveter<B>' cannot implement both 'Convertors.IConverter<Microsoft.Crm.Sdk.Lookup,B>' and 'Convertors.IConverter<Microsoft.Crm.Sdk.Lookup,Microsoft.Crm.Sdk.Moniker>' because they may unify for some type parameter substitutions

Is there a way to specify that T isn't a business entity?

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You are breaking rule #1 of overloading, you cant overload methods just based on the return type. This fails long before the generics issue. –  leppie Oct 18 '10 at 13:38
    
@Ieppie: What? What does that have to do with the error message? –  Timwi Oct 18 '10 at 13:39
    
@Timwi: Even if you could fudge the generics issue, it will still fail due to 'broken' overload. –  leppie Oct 18 '10 at 13:39
    
Even if there was a way to specify that T isn’t a BusinessEntity, you would still have the problem. The problem is that I could declare a LookupConverter<Moniker> and then that would have to implement two copies of IConverter<Lookup, Moniker>, which would make the class’s behaviour ambiguous. –  Timwi Oct 18 '10 at 13:40
1  
The overload issue could be addressed by explicitly implementing one of the interfaces. If that is acceptable, then it is a non-issue. –  Dr. Wily's Apprentice Oct 18 '10 at 15:06

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Nope, I'm afraid not. The only options you have are listed here Constraints on Type Parameters

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No, there are no "negative" constraints.

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How would you go around this unability to express resolvance of conflicgs? –  the_drow Oct 18 '10 at 13:34
    
@the_drow: It's hard to say without knowing why you want the same type to convert generically and the specific type. –  Jon Skeet Oct 18 '10 at 13:51
    
A lookup is a type/id tuple that represents a record in the database, converting it to a real type involves accessing a web service and fetching an xml file that is serialized to a DynamicEntity, I then convert the DynamicEntity (which is a BusinessEntity) to a home-coocked strong type. A lookup can also be converted to a moniker which is practically the same as a lookup but with less features and it is used somewhere else in the system and thus I would like to convert it easily. This is not my code, it's Microsoft Dynamics CRM shitty architecture. Only the converters are mine. –  the_drow Oct 18 '10 at 15:59
    
@the_drow: Which bit is forcing you to implement both interfaces in the same class though? –  Jon Skeet Oct 18 '10 at 16:00
1  
@the_drow: No, I don't think it's an important feature - it would add significant complexity with only very rare benefits, IMO. And yes, just go with separate classes. –  Jon Skeet Oct 19 '10 at 6:30

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