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Here we have a Spring based webapp in google apps engine.

I've created a UserDetailService class to load the UserDetails from the GAE data store (assuming this is the best approach).

@Service("springUserDetailsService")
public class SpringUserDetailsService implements UserDetailsService {

    @Resource(name="userDao")
    private IUserDao userDao;
    //...

But GAE throws the following exception (apparently) when it tries to persist the session to the data store.

java.lang.RuntimeException: java.io.NotSerializableException: com.prepayproxy.servicelayer.SpringUserDetailsService
    at com.google.apphosting.runtime.jetty.SessionManager.serialize(SessionManager.java:387)
    at com.google.apphosting.runtime.jetty.SessionManager.createEntityForSession(SessionManager.java:364)

I first thought to Serialize the SprintUserDetailsService object, but it has a reference to my UserDao, which in turn has references to data source objects, at about that point I freaked out and decided to see if there's a better approach.

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I created a custom UserDetailsService in one app but not hosted on GAE. have you any idea WHY gae want to serialize the service ? are you sure that you must the 'service' annotation ? what does this annotation ? ... sorry only little experiance with gae –  Alois Cochard Oct 18 '10 at 13:41
    
GAE persists the session to the data store, I assume it's part of scaling to large numbers of apps, they document it clearly. And spring stores the security context in the session, thus this is getting tied to the session that way I believe. –  David Parks Oct 18 '10 at 13:45
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

On your second point, I am only assuming that spring security is storing a reference to the UserDetailsService in the session, which is how it gets tied up with the GAE serialization of the session. All beyond my control as far as I see unless I missed something.

There's no reason for SpringSecurity to put a reference to your application's UserDetailsStore into the session. A UserDetailsStore is not conceptually session scoped.

If the session manager is trying to serialize a UserDetailsService, it is probably a result of a reference to the UserDetailsService in some other session scoped object.

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I'll look into that, not sure why UserDetailsService gets serialized w/ the session, I just assumed that Spring Security Framework did it. Though I don't use it anywhere else, I just have a super simple test app up now and I don't touch the session in any way in my code. –  David Parks Oct 21 '10 at 9:37
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Two options:

  • don't worry about the DataSource - spring, since version 3, serves a proxy which, when deserialized, gets a fresh data source, rather than the original (which is not relevant)

  • don't put your service in the session. Perhaps it is referenced by something that is in session scope, so make it volatile there.

See also this question

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On your second point, I am only assuming that spring security is storing a reference to the UserDetailsService in the session, which is how it gets tied up with the GAE serialization of the session. All beyond my control as far as I see unless I missed something. Perhaps your first point is a solution, but it seems messy to have to go around serializing everything this way, guess I was hoping for a silver bullet - or at least a well documented/previously tested approach. –  David Parks Oct 18 '10 at 13:47
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