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The HTML you see below is text I have scraped from a remote site, as-is, into a local variable.

Now I need to parse the authorName and bookTitle from the HTML tags into their own variables, given the following consistent format of the scraped text:

<p>
  William Faulkner - 'Light In August'
  <br/>
  William Faulkner - 'Sanctuary'
  <br/>
  William Faulkner - 'The Sound and the Fury'
</p>

Is it possible to do this in XPath?

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Good question, +1. See my answer for short and easy XPath expressions. –  Dimitre Novatchev Oct 18 '10 at 16:10
    
I would also look into converting it into XHTML before you try to use xPath. Even though it's valid XML now you never know what might change. Some good resources: tidy.sourceforge.net and xml.coverpages.org/sgml.html –  Abe Miessler Oct 18 '10 at 16:18
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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Yes. And easy, too:

//p/text()

Will give you three separate text nodes:

"
  William Faulkner - 'Light In August'
  ",
"
  William Faulkner - 'Sanctuary'
  ",
"
  William Faulkner - 'The Sound and the Fury'
"

Remember that preceding and trailing whitespace (including any line breaks) is always part of the text node. Trim the result.

I take it that you do not need help with splitting the resulting strings into author and title.

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1  
Interesting, can you provide some documentation that shows this is how text() works? –  Abe Miessler Oct 18 '10 at 16:04
1  
@Abe: Before I start, can you indicate why you think that this is how text() does not work? –  Tomalak Oct 18 '10 at 16:06
1  
Relax tough guy... I didn't say I don't think it works, I just didn't know it could work like this and would like to be able to read up on it. Not challenging you, just seeking knowledge... –  Abe Miessler Oct 18 '10 at 16:07
1  
@Abe: I'm perfectly relaxed. text() selects all text node children of a node. And the <p> has five children here, three of type text interspersed with two of type element (<br/>). –  Tomalak Oct 18 '10 at 16:12
1  
Awesome thanks! –  Abe Miessler Oct 18 '10 at 16:20
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In XPath 1.0 you can select the text node childs of p:

/p/text()

You can also get the string before (author) and after (title) - character for each text node

substring-before(/p/text()[1],'-')

Result:

  William Faulkner 

substring-after(/p/text()[1],'-')

Result:

 'Light In August'       

In XPath 2.0:

/p/text()/substring-before(.,'-')

Result in a sequence of 3 items:

William Faulkner William Faulkner William Faulkner 

And

/p/text()/substring-after(.,'-')

Result also in a sequence of 3 items:

'Light In August' 'Sanctuary' 'The Sound and the Fury'
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You can get the $N-th author name with this XPath expression:

substring-before(normalize-space(p/text()[$N]), ' -')

You can get the $N-th title with this XPath expression:

substring-after(normalize-space(p/text()[$N]), ' - ')

You can get first the count of all text nodes with:

count(p/text())

then you can issue the first two XPath expressions, substituting $N with the numbers in the interval

[1,count(p/text())]
share|improve this answer
    
@Tomalak: Thanks, I saw this immediately (before your comment) and it was already corrected when I read it. Monday morning, you know... :( –  Dimitre Novatchev Oct 18 '10 at 16:11
    
Comment already deleted, right after I saw you fixed it. Seems there is some caching involved with the comments, if I change them you do not seem to see the change right away. –  Tomalak Oct 18 '10 at 16:35
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