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I currently have something close to the following implementation of a FPS independent game loop for physics based games. It works very well on just about every computer I have tested it on, keeping the game speed consistent when frame rate drops. However I am going to be porting to embedded devices which will likely struggle harder with video and I am wondering if it will still cut the mustard.

edits:

For this question assume that msecs() returns the time passed in milliseconds which the program has run. The implementation of msecs is different on different platforms. This loop is also run in different ways on different platforms.

#define MSECS_PER_STEP 20
int stepCount, stepSize;  // these are not globals in the real source

void loop() {
    int i,j;
    int iterations =0;
    static int accumulator; // the accumulator holds extra msecs
    static int lastMsec;
    int deltatime = msec() - lastMsec;
    lastMsec = msec();

    // deltatime should be the time since the last call to loop
    if (deltatime != 0) {
        // iterations determines the number of steps which are needed
        iterations = deltatime/MSECS_PER_STEP;

        // save any left over millisecs in the accumulator
        accumulator += deltatime%MSECS_PER_STEP;
    }
    // when the accumulator has gained enough msecs for a step...
    while (accumulator >= MSECS_PER_STEP) {
        iterations++;
        accumulator -= MSECS_PER_STEP;
    }
    handleInput(); // gathers user input from an event queue
    for (j=0; j<iterations; j++) {
        // here step count is a way of taking a more granular step 
        // without effecting the overall speed of the simulation (step size)
        for (i=0; i<stepCount; i++) {
            doStep(stepSize/(float) stepCount); // forwards the sim
        }
    }
}
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I know I probably shouldn't be storing time stuff in ints but that is not really what I'm asking here –  Nick Oct 18 '10 at 16:08
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1 Answer

up vote 6 down vote accepted

I just have a few comments. The first is that you don't have enough comments. There are places where it's not clear what you are trying to do so it is difficult to say if there is a better way to do it, but I'll point those out as I come to them. First, though:

#define MSECS_PER_STEP 20
int stepCount, stepSize;  // these are not globals in the real source

void loop() {
    int i,j;
    int iterations =0;

    static int accumulator; // the accumulator holds extra msecs
    static int lastMsec;

These are not initialized to anything. The probably turn up as 0, but you should have initialized them. Also, rather than declaring them as static you might want to consider putting them in a structure that you pass into loop by reference.

    int deltatime = msec() - lastMsec;

Since lastMsec wasn't (initialized and is probably 0) this probably starts out as a big delta.

    lastMsec = msec();

This line, just like the last line, calls msec. This is probably meant as "the current time", and these calls are close enough that the returned value is probably the same for both calls, which is probably also what you expected, but still, you call the function twice. You should change these lines to int now = msec(); int deltatime = now - lastMsec; lastMsec = now; to avoid calling this function twice. Current time getting functions often have much higher overhead than you think.

    if (deltatime != 0) {
        iterations = deltatime/MSECS_PER_STEP;
        accumulator += deltatime%MSECS_PER_STEP;
    }

You should have a comment here that says what this does, as well as a comment above that says what the variables were meant to mean.

    while (accumulator >= MSECS_PER_STEP) {
        iterations++;
        accumulator -= MSECS_PER_STEP;
    }

This loop needs a comment. It also needs to not be there. It appears that it could have been replaced with iterations += accumulator/MSECS_PER_STEP; accumulator %= MSECS_PER_STEP;. The division and modulus should run in shorter and more consistent time than the loop on any machine that has hardware division (which many do).

    handleInput(); // gathers user input from an event queue

    for (j=0; j<iterations; j++) {
        for (i=0; i<stepCount; i++) {
            doStep(stepSize/(float) stepCount); // forwards the sim
        }
    }

Doing steps in a loop independent of input will have the effect of making the game unresponsive if it does execute slow and get behind. It appears, at least, that if the game gets behind all of the input will start to stack up and get executed together and all of the in-game time will pass in one chunk. This is a less than graceful way to fail.

Additionally, I can guess what the j loop (outer loop) means, but the inner loop I am less clear on. also, the value passed to the doStep function -- what does that mean.

}

This is the last curly brace. I think that it looks lonely.

I don't know what goes on as far as whatever calls your loop function, which may be out of your control, and that may dictate what this function does and how it looks, but if not I hope that you will reconsider the structure. I believe that a better way to do it would be to have a function that is called repeatedly but with only one event at the time (issued regularly at a relatively short period). These events can be either user input events or timer events. User input events just set things up to react upon the next timer event. (when you don't have any events to process you sleep)

You should always assume that each timer event is processed at the same period, even though there may be some drift here if the processing gets behind. The main oddity that you may notice here is that if the game gets behind on processing timer events and then catches up again the time within the game may appear to slow down (below real time), then speed up (to real time), and then slow back down (to real time).

Ways to deal with this include only allowing one timer event to be in the event queue at one time, which would result in time appearing to slow down (below real time) and then speed back up (to real time) with no super speed interval.

Another way to do this, which is functionally similar to what you have, would be to have the last step of processing each timer event be to queue up the next timer event (note that no one else should send timer events {except for the first one} if this is the way you choose to implement the game). This would mean doing away with the regular time intervals between timer events and also restrict the ability for the program to sleep, since at the very least every time the event queue were inspected there would be a timer event to process.

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fantastic answer - lots of food for thought here. I will add a few comments. –  Nick Oct 18 '10 at 20:02
1  
static means they are zero. –  Prof. Falken Oct 18 '10 at 22:16
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