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I want to center a div vertically with CSS. I don't want tables or Javascript, but only pure CSS. I found some solutions, but all of them are missing Internet Explorer 6 support.

<body>
    <div>Div to be aligned vertically</div>
</body>

How can I center a div vertically in all major browsers, including Internet Explorer 6?

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1  
17  
@MarcoDemaio Don't people constantly frown upon tables for layouts on here? –  Chud37 Jan 21 '13 at 15:35
7  
@Chud37: it depends what you have to do, tables for layout are generally not versatile and long to type in code, with css you can easily change a 2 cols layout into a 3/4/5 sols layout etc. But in this case is different, using dozens of css tips-and-tricks for such a simple task that could be accomplished with a perfect cross-browser table, it's like attempting to enter in your house through the window instead of using the door. –  Marco Demaio Jan 24 '13 at 19:52
2  
The BEST answer to this question can be found at stackoverflow.com/a/13075912/5651 –  jessegavin Aug 14 '13 at 12:58
    
Just see this answer that vertically align a div in other div. Vertically Aligning Divs –  Lalit Kumar Dec 27 '13 at 12:41

24 Answers 24

up vote 468 down vote accepted

Below is the best all-around solution I could build to vertically & horizontally center a fixed-width, flexible height content box. Tested and working for recent versions of FF, Opera, Chrome, & Safari, and MSIE 6+.

HTML

<div class="outer">
<div class="middle">
<div class="inner">

<h1>The Content</h1>

<p>Once upon a midnight dreary...</p>

</div>
</div>
</div>

CSS

.outer {
    display: table;
    position: absolute;
    height: 100%;
    width: 100%;
}

.middle {
    display: table-cell;
    vertical-align: middle;
}

.inner {
    margin-left: auto;
    margin-right: auto; 
    width: /*whatever width you want*/;
}

To accommodate for IE 7 & older, use a separate style sheet with these changes:

<!--[if lte IE 7]><link rel="stylesheet... /><![endif]-->;
.outer {
    display: inline;
    top: 0;
}

.middle {
    display: inline;
    top: 50%;
    position: relative;
}

.inner {
    display: inline;
    top: -50%;
    position: relative;
}

See Test page

I built in some dynamic content to test the flexibility. Would love to know if anyone sees any problems with it. Should work well for centered overlays also -- lightbox, pop-up, etc.

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1  
Worked perfectly when the inner div was a flexible height. I tested it in Chrome and IE7 without the outer div positioned absolutely and that worked as well. –  Sabrina Gelbart Feb 9 '12 at 14:08
    
Without an "absolute" outer DIV, any content on the page before it will push the whole block down. This makes it more independent of other page content. –  Billbad Apr 3 '12 at 17:00
16  
This seems to be the only solution that doesn't require any hard-coded heights. –  Martijn Jun 21 '12 at 14:37
    
IE7 + display: inline-block? IE 5.5-7.0: natural inline elements only –  biziclop Dec 7 '12 at 19:01
    
@biziclop Acknowledged. Let me figure out what I did there. –  Billbad Dec 18 '12 at 12:07

Actually you need two div's for vertical centering. The div containing the content must have a width and height.

<body>
<div id="container">
  <div id="content">
    <h1>Centered div</h1>
  </div>
</div>
</body>

#container{
   position: absolute;
   top: 50%;
   margin-top: -200px;/* half of #content height*/
   left: 0;
   width: 100%;
}
#content {
   width: 624px;
   margin-left: auto;
   margin-right: auto;
   height: 395px;
}

Here is the result

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Thanks!!! Worked for me. Do you mind explain a little how you came up with it? –  Dao Lam Aug 29 '13 at 20:56
1  
it's an old trick... top 50% and the top margin negative half the height for the inner div –  Manatax Sep 5 '13 at 21:46
15  
it's assuming you have a fixed height for div. don't work when div can change height. –  Andre Figueiredo Sep 23 '13 at 12:22
4  
i have compiled a list of all ways that are useful..jsfiddle.net/k6ShD/4 –  Muhammad Umer Mar 7 '14 at 9:09

One more I can't see in the list:

.Absolute-Center {
  margin: auto;
  position: absolute;
  top: 0; left: 0; bottom: 0; right: 0;
}
  • Cross-browser (including IE8-10 without hacks!)
  • Responsive with percentages and min-/max-
  • Centered regardless of padding (without box-sizing!)
  • Height must be declared (see Variable Height)
  • Recommended setting overflow: auto to prevent content spillover (see Overflow)

Source: Absolute Horizontal And Vertical Centering In CSS

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2  
This worked for me, but I needed to have a fixed width and height in chrome for some reason –  ryan knell May 9 '14 at 0:11
    
Thank you. I needed a fix where I didn't need to calculate px height or width and this worked perfectly. –  GFoley83 May 14 '14 at 1:33
    
Great solution, especially because you don't need a parent div –  steebchen Jul 22 at 8:24
    
This does a stretch if the height is not fixed, other than that: nice solution –  Bart Burg Aug 14 at 9:06

This is the simplest method I found and I use it all the time (jsFiddle demo here)

Thank Chris Coyier from CSS Tricks for this article.

.v-wrap{
    height: 100%;
    white-space: nowrap;
    text-align: center;
}
.v-wrap:before{
    content: "";
    display: inline-block;
    vertical-align: middle;
    width: 0;
    /* adjust for white space between pseudo element and next sibling */
    margin-right: -.25em;
    /* stretch line height */
    height: 100%; 
}
.v-box{
    display: inline-block;
    vertical-align: middle;
    white-space: normal;
}
<div class="v-wrap">
    <article class="v-box">
        <p>This is how I've been doing it for some time</p>
    </article>
</div>

Support starts with IE8.

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5  
I like that this doesn't use any absolute positioning. –  Justin Apr 7 '14 at 17:59
    
This is the simplest solution among all other answers. –  Mohammad Walid Oct 10 '14 at 22:13
    
This is the best IE8+ solution. –  Justin Feb 19 at 17:17
    
Winner winner. Chicken dinner. –  shaunw May 13 at 16:22

The simplest way would be the following 3 lines of CSS:

  1. position: relative;
  2. top: 50%;
  3. transform: translateY(-50%);

Following is an example:

div.outer-div {
  height: 170px;
  width: 300px;
  background-color: lightgray;
}

div.middle-div {
  position: relative;
  top: 50%;
  -webkit-transform: translateY(-50%);
  -ms-transform: translateY(-50%);
  transform: translateY(-50%);
}
<div class='outer-div'>
  <div class='middle-div'>
    Test text
  </div>
</div>

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1  
Setting position: absolute is not necessary on outer-div –  IanB Feb 5 at 6:44
    
Hi, IanB! You were right. I just updated my code. Thanks! –  DrupalFever Mar 2 at 16:47
    
the only thing that worked for my slider. great, thanks. –  lakesare Mar 11 at 21:25
    
note: doesn't work correct if the height of the outer div is set with "min-height: 170px" –  Bart Burg Aug 14 at 9:10

Unfortunately — but not surprisingly — the solution is more complicated than one would wish it to be. Also unfortunately, you'll need to use additional divs around the div you want vertically centered.

For standards-compliant browsers like Mozilla, Opera, Safari, etc. you need to set the outer div to be displayed as a table and the inner div to be displayed as a table-cell — which can then be vertically centered. For Internet Explorer, you need to position the inner div absolutely within the outer div and then specify the top as 50%. The following pages explain this technique well and provide some code samples too:

There is also a technique to do the vertical centering using Javascript. Vertical alignment of content with JavaScript & CSS demonstrates it.

share|improve this answer

to center the Div in a page check the fiddle link

#vh {
    border-radius: 15px;
    box-shadow: 0 0 8px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.4);
    padding: 25px;
    width: 200px;
    height: 200px;
    background: white;
    text-align: center;
    margin: auto;
    position: absolute;
    top: 0;
    left: 0;
    bottom: 0;
    right: 0;
}
<div id="vh">Div to be aligned vertically</div>

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2  
Only works with fixed heights... –  Armel Larcier Feb 20 '14 at 20:50
2  
@ArmelLarcier, no, it works with relative height also. –  user Mar 9 '14 at 23:15
1  
50% height is fixed. It is not relative to content, but parent. –  Armel Larcier Mar 10 '14 at 8:00
1  
@ArmelLarcier That's incorrect. Relative units are percentages %, ems and rems. Absolute or fixed values are pixels or points. What you're referring to is "it only works with a declared height". Howevever, although this method described by Moes does require a height, when you declare it in relative units, percentage is the best, no matter how much content is inside the centered DIV that DIV will expand vertically to fit its content. That's the beauty of this method. The other good thing is that this method works in IE8/9/10 in case someone still needs to support those browsers. –  Ricardo Zea Jan 14 at 4:45
1  
@ArmelLarcier It's all good. Is not wrong brother. Try it: codepen.io/shshaw/pen/gEiDt - Add paragraphs to the green box ;]. Granted, it uses Modernizr to accomplish the effect, but all in all it's doable. I saw your answer and the CSS-Tricks.com post as well, but that method doesn't make me happy, it uses extra markup and the CSS is too verbose. I think the best solution is either using flexbox or the transform: translate(-50%, -50%); technique. For IE8 I'd just leave it top/center aligned and move on. –  Ricardo Zea Jan 15 at 17:24

This is always where I go when I have to come back to this issue

For those who don't want to make the jump:

  1. Specify the parent container as position:relative or position:absolute.
  2. Specify a fixed height on the child container.
  3. Set position:absolute and top:50% on the child container to move the top down to the middle of the parent.
  4. Set margin-top:-yy where yy is half the height of the child container to offset the item up.

An example of this in code:

<style type="text/css">
    #myoutercontainer { position:relative }
    #myinnercontainer { position:absolute; top:50%; height:10em; margin-top:-5em }
</style>
...
<div id="myoutercontainer">
    <div id="myinnercontainer">
        <p>Hey look! I'm vertically centered!</p>
        <p>How sweet is this?!</p>
    </div>
</div>
share|improve this answer

After a lot of research I finally found the ultimate solution. It works even for floated elements. View Source

.element {
    position: relative;
    top: 50%;
    transform: translateY(-50%); /* or try 50% */
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is the best! –  iwill Jul 7 at 3:47
    
This does works really well, provided you remember that the container element must have an implicit or explicit height; jsfiddle.net/14kt53un A minor gotcha to those who are relatively new to CSS. –  Martyn Shutt Jul 19 at 11:05

A modern way to center an element vertically would be to use flexbox.

What you need is a parent to decide the height and a child to center.

The example below will center a div to the center within your browser. What's important (in my example) is to set height:100% to body and html and then min-height:100% to your container.

body, html {
  background:#f5f5f5;
  box-sizing:border-box;
  height:100%;
  margin:0;
}

#center_container {
  align-items:center;
  display:flex;
  min-height:100%;
}

#center {
  background:white;
  margin:0 auto;
  padding:10px;
  text-align:center;
  width:200px;
}
<div id='center_container'>
  <div id='center'>I am center.</div>
</div>

share|improve this answer

This question is old enough, so if someone cares IE9+ only, can use flexbox: Demo Fiddle

flexbox support

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Android < 4.4 doesn't support align-items: center; ! –  André Fiedler Nov 6 '14 at 13:42
    
Actually, it does support align-items: center; caniuse.com/#search=align-items –  t.mikael.d Jun 2 at 12:51
    
@t.mikael.d You might want to take a closer look at that table. For Android < 4.4, it states "Only supports the old flexbox specification and does not support wrapping." –  Nathan Osman Aug 23 at 1:37

I know the answers is already given, but I think that link can be useful for the central alignment in all cases: howtocenterincss.com

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I did it with this (change width, height, margin-top and margin-left accordingly):

.wrapper {
    width:960px;
    height:590px;
    position:absolute;
    top:50%;
    left:50%;
    margin-top:-295px;
    margin-left:-480px;
}

<div class="wrapper"> -- Content -- </div>
share|improve this answer
    
Thats only good if you know the width/height of the DIV your trying to center. This isn't what the question is asking –  egr103 Feb 19 '13 at 10:02

Just do it : add the class @ your div :

  .modal {
       margin: auto;
       position: absolute;
       top: 0;
       right: 0;
       left: 0;
       bottom: 0;
       height: 240px;

  }

and read this article for explanation. Note : Height is necessary.

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By using Transform property we can do vertically center div easily.

.main-div {
    background: none repeat scroll 0 0 #999;
    font-size: 18px;
    height: 450px;
    max-width: 850px;
    padding: 15px;
}

.vertical-center {
    background: none repeat scroll 0 0 #1fa67a;
    color: #ffffff;
    padding: 15px;
    position: relative;
    top: 50%;
    transform: translateY(-50%);
    -moz-transform: translateY(-50%);
    -webkit-transform: translateY(-50%);
    -ms-transform: translateY(-50%);
    -o-transform: translateY(-50%);
}
<div class="main-div">
    <div class="vertical-center">
        <span>"Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollit anim id est laborum."</span>
    </div>
</div>

see here for full article

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Especially for parent divs with relative (unknown) height, the Centering in the unknown solution works great for me. There are some really nice code examples in the article.

Tested in Chrome, FF, Opera, IE.

/* This parent can be any width and height */
.block {
  text-align: center;
}

/* The ghost, nudged to maintain perfect centering */
.block:before {
  content: '';
  display: inline-block;
  height: 100%;
  vertical-align: middle;
  margin-right: -0.25em; /* Adjusts for spacing */
}

/* The element to be centered, can
   also be of any width and height */ 
.centered {
  display: inline-block;
  vertical-align: middle;
  width: 300px;
}
<div style="width: 400px; height: 200px;">
   <div class="block" style="height: 90%; width: 100%">
  <div class="centered">
	 <h1>Some text</h1>
	 <p>Any other text..."</p>
  </div> 
   </div>
</div>

share|improve this answer

I find this one most useful.. it gives the most accurate 'H' layout and is very simple to understand.

The benefit in this markup is that you define your content size in a single place -> "PageContent".
The Colors of the page background and its horizontal margins are defined in their corresponding divs.

<div id="PageLayoutConfiguration" 
     style="display: table;
     position:absolute; top: 0px; right: 0px; bottom: 0px; left: 0px;
     width: 100%; height: 100%;">

        <div id="PageBackground" 
             style="display: table-cell; vertical-align: middle;
             background-color: purple;">

            <div id="PageHorizontalMargins"
                 style="width: 100%;
                 background-color: seashell;">

                <div id="PageContent" 
                     style="width: 1200px; height: 620px; margin: 0 auto;
                     background-color: grey;">

                     my content goes here...

                </div>
            </div>
        </div>
    </div>

And here with CSS separated:

<div id="PageLayoutConfiguration">
     <div id="PageBackground">
          <div id="PageHorizontalMargins">
               <div id="PageContent">
                     my content goes here...
               </div>
          </div>
     </div>
</div>

#PageLayoutConfiguration{
   display: table; width: 100%; height: 100%;
   position:absolute; top: 0px; right: 0px; bottom: 0px; left: 0px;
}

#PageBackground{
   display: table-cell; vertical-align: middle;
   background-color: purple;
}

#PageHorizontalMargins{
   style="width: 100%;
   background-color: seashell;
}
#PageContent{
   width: 1200px; height: 620px; margin: 0 auto;
   background-color: grey;
}
share|improve this answer

Vertical & Horizontal CENTER

HTML

<div id="dialog">Centered Dialog</div>

CSS

#dialog {
    position:fixed; top:50%; left:50%; z-index:99991;
    width:300px; height:60px;
    margin-top:-150px;  /* half of the width */
    margin-left:-30px; /* half of the height */}

Enjoy!

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Here is a simple way, with almost no code:

CSS code:

.main{
    height:100%;
}

.center{
    top:50%;
    margin-top:50%;
}

Html code:

<div class="main">
    <div class="center">
        Hi, I am centered!
    </div>
</div>

Your text will be in the middle of the page!

share|improve this answer

to vertical-align a box in web page, including IE6 you may use

  1. conditionnal comments
  2. haslayout propertie
  3. display:table-value for others

Fiddle

/* IE8 and others*/
.main {
  width:500px;
  margin:auto;
  border:solid;
  }
html {
  height:100%;
  width:100%;
  display:table;
  }
body {
  display:table-cell;
  vertical-align:middle;
  }
<!-- [if lte IE 7]>
<style>/* should be in the <head> */
html, body , .ie {
height:100%;
text-align:center;
white-space:nowrap;
}
.ie , .main{
display:inline;/* used with zoom in case you take a block elemnt instead an inline element*/
zoom:1;
vertical-align:middle;
text-align:left;
white-space:normal;
}
</style>
<b class="ie"></b>
<!--[endif]-->
<div class="main">
  <p>Fill it up with your content </p>
  <p><a href="https://jsfiddle.net/h8z24s5v/embedded/result/">JsFiddle versie</a></p>
</div>

Actually, Ie7 would bring some trouble here being the only wich will strictly apply height:100% on html/body elements.


But, this is past and today and who still minds old IEs, table/table-cell is just fine, display:flex is promising and display:grid will show up some day.

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I use this. Works in IE8+

height:268px - for display:table acts like min-height

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<head>
    <title></title>
    <style>
        * {
            padding:0;
            margin:0;
        }
        body {
            background:#cc9999;
        }
        p {
            background:#f0ad4e;
        }
        #all {
            margin:200px auto;
        }
        .ff-valign-wrap {
            display:table;
            width:100%;
            height:268px;
            background:#ff00ff;
        }
        .ff-valign {
            display:table-cell;
            height:100%;
            vertical-align:middle;
            text-align: center;
            background:#ffff00;
        }
    </style>
</head>
<body>

    <div id="all">
        <div class="ff-valign-wrap">
            <div class="ff-valign">
                <p>Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit. Amet, animi autem doloribus earum expedita, ipsum laboriosam nostrum nulla officiis optio quam quis quod sunt tempora tenetur veritatis vero voluptatem voluptates?</p>
                <p>Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit. Amet, animi autem doloribus earum expedita, ipsum laboriosam nostrum nulla officiis optio quam quis quod sunt tempora tenetur veritatis vero voluptatem voluptates?</p>
                <p>Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit. Amet, animi autem doloribus earum expedita, ipsum laboriosam nostrum nulla officiis optio quam quis quod sunt tempora tenetur veritatis vero voluptatem voluptates?</p>
                <p>Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit. Amet, animi autem doloribus earum expedita, ipsum laboriosam nostrum nulla officiis optio quam quis quod sunt tempora tenetur veritatis vero voluptatem voluptates?</p>
                <p>Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit. Amet, animi autem doloribus earum expedita, ipsum laboriosam nostrum nulla officiis optio quam quis quod sunt tempora tenetur veritatis vero voluptatem voluptates?</p>
                <p>Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit. Amet, animi autem doloribus earum expedita, ipsum laboriosam nostrum nulla officiis optio quam quis quod sunt tempora tenetur veritatis vero voluptatem voluptates?</p>
                <p>Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit. Amet, animi autem doloribus earum expedita, ipsum laboriosam nostrum nulla officiis optio quam quis quod sunt tempora tenetur veritatis vero voluptatem voluptates?</p>
            </div>
        </div>
    </div>

</body>
</html>
share|improve this answer

There are so many answers, but I just found another way which worked for me.

<div class="container">
  <div class="vertical">
     <h1>Welcome</h1>
     <h2>Aligned Vertically</h2>
     <a href="#">Click ME</a>
   </div>
</div>

css

.vertical{
  top: 50%;
  -webkit-transform: translateY(-50%);
  -ms-transform: translateY(-50%);
  transform: translateY(-50%);
}

More info

share|improve this answer

best thing to do would be:

#vertalign{
  height:300px;
  width: 300px;
  position:absolute;
  top: calc(50vh - 150px); 
}

150px because that's half of the div's height in this case.

share|improve this answer

The answer from Billbad only works with fixed width of the .inner div. This solution works for dynamic width by adding the attribute text-align: center to the .outer div.

.outer {
  position: absolute;
  display: table;
  width: 100%;
  height: 100%;
  text-align: center;
}
.middle {
  display: table-cell;
  vertical-align: middle;
}
.inner {
  text-align: center;
  display: inline-block;
  width: auto;
}
<div class="outer">
  <div class="middle">
    <div class="inner">
      Content
    </div>
  </div>
</div>

share|improve this answer

protected by Josh Crozier Mar 16 '14 at 1:10

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