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I want to center a div vertically with CSS. I don't want tables or Javascript, but only pure CSS. I found some solutions, but all of them are missing Internet Explorer 6 support.

<body>
    <div>Div to be aligned vertically</div>
</body>

How can I center a div vertically in all major browsers, including Internet Explorer 6?

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12  
Why don't you want to solve this task with a very simple TABLE? –  Marco Demaio Mar 29 '10 at 16:20
1  
9  
@MarcoDemaio Don't people constantly frown upon tables for layouts on here? –  Chud37 Jan 21 '13 at 15:35
4  
@Chud37: it depends what you have to do, tables for layout are generally not versatile and long to type in code, with css you can easily change a 2 cols layout into a 3/4/5 sols layout etc. But in this case is different, using dozens of css tips-and-tricks for such a simple task that could be accomplished with a perfect cross-browser table, it's like attempting to enter in your house through the window instead of using the door. –  Marco Demaio Jan 24 '13 at 19:52
    
The BEST answer to this question can be found at stackoverflow.com/a/13075912/5651 –  jessegavin Aug 14 '13 at 12:58

13 Answers 13

up vote 225 down vote accepted

Below is the best all-around solution I could build to vertically & horizontally center a fixed-width, flexible height content box. Tested and working for recent versions of FF, Opera, Chrome, & Safari, and MSIE 6+.

HTML

<div class="outer">
<div class="middle">
<div class="inner">

<h1>The Content</h1>

<p>Once upon a midnight dreary...</p>

</div>
</div>
</div>

CSS

.outer {
    display: table;
    position: absolute;
    height: 100%;
    width: 100%;
}

.middle {
    display: table-cell;
    vertical-align: middle;
}

.inner {
    margin-left: auto;
    margin-right: auto; 
    width: /*whatever width you want*/;
}

To accommodate for IE 7 & older, use a separate style sheet with these changes:

<!--[if lte IE 7]><link rel="stylesheet... /><![endif]-->;
.outer {
    display: inline;
    top: 0;
}

.middle {
    display: inline;
    top: 50%;
    position: relative;
}

.inner {
    display: inline;
    top: -50%;
    position: relative;
}

Test page: http://emergentweb.com/test/valign.html

I built in some dynamic content to test the flexibility. Would love to know if anyone sees any problems with it. Should work well for centered overlays also -- lightbox, pop-up, etc.

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1  
Worked perfectly when the inner div was a flexible height. I tested it in Chrome and IE7 without the outer div positioned absolutely and that worked as well. –  Sabrina Gelbart Feb 9 '12 at 14:08
    
Without an "absolute" outer DIV, any content on the page before it will push the whole block down. This makes it more independent of other page content. –  Billbad Apr 3 '12 at 17:00
9  
This seems to be the only solution that doesn't require any hard-coded heights. –  Martijn Jun 21 '12 at 14:37
    
IE7 + display: inline-block? IE 5.5-7.0: natural inline elements only –  biziclop Dec 7 '12 at 19:01
    
@biziclop Acknowledged. Let me figure out what I did there. –  Billbad Dec 18 '12 at 12:07

Actually you need two div's for vertical centering. The div containing the content must have a width and height.

<body>
<div id="container">
  <div id="content">
    <h1>Centered div</h1>
  </div>
</div>
</body>

#container{
   position: absolute;
   top: 50%;
   margin-top: -200px;/* half of #content height*/
   left: 0;
   width: 100%;
}
#content {
   width: 624px;
   margin-left: auto;
   margin-right: auto;
   height: 395px;
}

Here is the result

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Thanks!!! Worked for me. Do you mind explain a little how you came up with it? –  Dao Lam Aug 29 '13 at 20:56
1  
it's an old trick... top 50% and the top margin negative half the height for the inner div –  Manatax Sep 5 '13 at 21:46
7  
it's assuming you have a fixed height for div. don't work when div can change height. –  André Figueiredo Sep 23 '13 at 12:22
3  
i have compiled a list of all ways that are useful..jsfiddle.net/k6ShD/4 –  Muhammad Umer Mar 7 at 9:09

One more I can't see in the list:

.Absolute-Center {
  margin: auto;
  position: absolute;
  top: 0; left: 0; bottom: 0; right: 0;
}
  • Cross-browser (including IE8-10 without hacks!)
  • Responsive with percentages and min-/max-
  • Centered regardless of padding (without box-sizing!)
  • Height must be declared (see Variable Height)
  • Recommended setting overflow: auto to prevent content spillover (see Overflow)

Source: Absolute Horizontal And Vertical Centering In CSS

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This worked for me, but I needed to have a fixed width and height in chrome for some reason –  ryan knell May 9 at 0:11
    
Thank you. I needed a fix where I didn't need to calculate px height or width and this worked perfectly. –  GFoley83 May 14 at 1:33

Unfortunately — but not surprisingly — the solution is more complicated than one would wish it to be. Also unfortunately, you'll need to use additional divs around the div you want vertically centered.

For standards-compliant browsers like Mozilla, Opera, Safari, etc. you need to set the outer div to be displayed as a table and the inner div to be displayed as a table-cell — which can then be vertically centered. For Internet Explorer, you need to position the inner div absolutely within the outer div and then specify the top as 50%. The following pages explain this technique well and provide some code samples too:

There is also a technique to do the vertical centering using Javascript. Vertical alignment of content with JavaScript & CSS demonstrates it.

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This is always where I go when I have to come back to this issue

For those who don't want to make the jump:

  1. Specify the parent container as position:relative or position:absolute.
  2. Specify a fixed height on the child container.
  3. Set position:absolute and top:50% on the child container to move the top down to the middle of the parent.
  4. Set margin-top:-yy where yy is half the height of the child container to offset the item up.

An example of this in code:

<style type="text/css">
    #myoutercontainer { position:relative }
    #myinnercontainer { position:absolute; top:50%; height:10em; margin-top:-5em }
</style>
...
<div id="myoutercontainer">
    <div id="myinnercontainer">
        <p>Hey look! I'm vertically centered!</p>
        <p>How sweet is this?!</p>
    </div>
</div>
share|improve this answer

This is the simplest method I found and I use it all the time (jsFiddle demo here)

Thank Chris Coyier from CSS Tricks for this article.

HTML

<div class="v-wrap">
    <article class="v-box">
        <p>This is how I've been doing it for some time</p>
    </article>
</div>

CSS

.v-wrap{
    height: 100%;
    white-space: nowrap;
    text-align: center;
}
.v-wrap:before{
    content: "";
    display: inline-block;
    vertical-align: middle;
    width: 0;
    /* adjust for white space between pseudo element and next sibling */
    margin-right: -.25em;
    /* stretch line height */
    height: 100%; 
}
.v-box{
    display: inline-block;
    vertical-align: middle;
    white-space: normal;
}

Support starts with IE8.

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3  
I like that this doesn't use any absolute positioning. –  Justin Apr 7 at 17:59

to center the Div in a page check the fiddle link

<div id="vh">Div to be aligned vertically</div>

and the css

#vh {
    border-radius: 15px;
    box-shadow: 0 0 8px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.4);
    padding: 25px;
    width: 200px;
    height: 200px;
    background: white;
    text-align: center;
    margin: auto;
    position: absolute;
    top: 0;
    left: 0;
    bottom: 0;
    right: 0;
}
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2  
Only works with fixed heights... –  Armel Larcier Feb 20 at 20:50
1  
@ArmelLarcier, no, it works with relative height also. –  user Mar 9 at 23:15
1  
50% height is fixed. It is not relative to content, but parent. –  Armel Larcier Mar 10 at 8:00

I did it with this (change width, height, margin-top and margin-left accordingly):

.wrapper {
    width:960px;
    height:590px;
    position:absolute;
    top:50%;
    left:50%;
    margin-top:-295px;
    margin-left:-480px;
}

<div class="wrapper"> -- Content -- </div>
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Thats only good if you know the width/height of the DIV your trying to center. This isn't what the question is asking –  egr103 Feb 19 '13 at 10:02

This question is old enough, so if someone cares IE9+ only, can use flexbox:

http://jsfiddle.net/fTH6G/

flexbox support: http://caniuse.com/flexbox

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I find this one most useful.. it gives the most accurate 'H' layout and is very simple to understand.

The benefit in this markup is that you define your content size in a single place -> "PageContent".
The Colors of the page background and its horizontal margins are defined in their corresponding divs.

<div id="PageLayoutConfiguration" 
     style="display: table;
     position:absolute; top: 0px; right: 0px; bottom: 0px; left: 0px;
     width: 100%; height: 100%;">

        <div id="PageBackground" 
             style="display: table-cell; vertical-align: middle;
             background-color: purple;">

            <div id="PageHorizontalMargins"
                 style="width: 100%;
                 background-color: seashell;">

                <div id="PageContent" 
                     style="width: 1200px; height: 620px; margin: 0 auto;
                     background-color: grey;">

                     my content goes here...

                </div>
            </div>
        </div>
    </div>

And here with CSS separated:

<div id="PageLayoutConfiguration">
     <div id="PageBackground">
          <div id="PageHorizontalMargins">
               <div id="PageContent">
                     my content goes here...
               </div>
          </div>
     </div>
</div>

#PageLayoutConfiguration{
   display: table; width: 100%; height: 100%;
   position:absolute; top: 0px; right: 0px; bottom: 0px; left: 0px;
}

#PageBackground{
   display: table-cell; vertical-align: middle;
   background-color: purple;
}

#PageHorizontalMargins{
   style="width: 100%;
   background-color: seashell;
}
#PageContent{
   width: 1200px; height: 620px; margin: 0 auto;
   background-color: grey;
}
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Best answer from Billbad only works with fixed width of the .inner div. My solution for dynamical width adds the attribute text-align: center; to the .outer div.

    <style>
        .outer {
            position: absolute;
            display: table;
            width: 100%;
            height: 100%;
            text-align: center;
        }

        .middle {
            display: table-cell;
            vertical-align: middle;
        }

        .inner {
            text-align: center;
            display: inline-block;
            width: auto;
        }
    </style>
</head>
<body>
    <div class="outer">
        <div class="middle">
            <div class="inner">
                Content
            </div>
        </div>
    </div>
</body>

Ruwen

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I use this. Works in IE8+

height:268px; - for display:table acts like min-height

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<head>
    <title></title>
    <style>
        * {
            padding:0;
            margin:0;
        }
        body {
            background:#cc9999;
        }
        p {
            background:#f0ad4e;
        }
        #all {
            margin:200px auto;
        }
        .ff-valign-wrap {
            display:table;
            width:100%;
            height:268px;
            background:#ff00ff;
        }
        .ff-valign {
            display:table-cell;
            height:100%;
            vertical-align:middle;
            text-align: center;
            background:#ffff00;
        }
    </style>
</head>
<body>

    <div id="all">
        <div class="ff-valign-wrap">
            <div class="ff-valign">
                <p>Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit. Amet, animi autem doloribus earum expedita, ipsum laboriosam nostrum nulla officiis optio quam quis quod sunt tempora tenetur veritatis vero voluptatem voluptates?</p>
                <p>Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit. Amet, animi autem doloribus earum expedita, ipsum laboriosam nostrum nulla officiis optio quam quis quod sunt tempora tenetur veritatis vero voluptatem voluptates?</p>
                <p>Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit. Amet, animi autem doloribus earum expedita, ipsum laboriosam nostrum nulla officiis optio quam quis quod sunt tempora tenetur veritatis vero voluptatem voluptates?</p>
                <p>Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit. Amet, animi autem doloribus earum expedita, ipsum laboriosam nostrum nulla officiis optio quam quis quod sunt tempora tenetur veritatis vero voluptatem voluptates?</p>
                <p>Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit. Amet, animi autem doloribus earum expedita, ipsum laboriosam nostrum nulla officiis optio quam quis quod sunt tempora tenetur veritatis vero voluptatem voluptates?</p>
                <p>Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit. Amet, animi autem doloribus earum expedita, ipsum laboriosam nostrum nulla officiis optio quam quis quod sunt tempora tenetur veritatis vero voluptatem voluptates?</p>
                <p>Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit. Amet, animi autem doloribus earum expedita, ipsum laboriosam nostrum nulla officiis optio quam quis quod sunt tempora tenetur veritatis vero voluptatem voluptates?</p>
            </div>
        </div>
    </div>

</body>
</html>
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There's an even simpler trick that I use -- set the left and right margins for the div to "auto", and it will center it vertically.

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21  
That will only center it horizontally. –  RouteMapper May 6 '13 at 22:11

protected by Josh Crozier Mar 16 at 1:10

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